Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pre 2000 item #957948 (stock #364)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A very large Kutani Vase decorated by eccentric Zen Priest and painter Shimizu Kosho enclosed in the original sgned wooden box. The outer surfaceis covered in genuine gold, overwhich has been brushed the decorative calligraphy reading……Hana mushin Maneku chocho, mushin tazuneru shin. The box lid is attributed within to having been fired at the Kutani Shoryu kiln by Kosho himself, and the pot is signed on the base Ryu. The vase is over 12 inches (31 cm) tall, 9 inches (22 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. Kosho (1911-1999) was a unique and prolific artist-priest studied in the eccentric painting style associated with Nara. He was long time abbot of the massive Todai-ji temple complex in Nara, home of the great Buddha. Like many priests, he began producing art to propogate his teachings later in life. He proved extremely popular, the nonchalant style plucking a string in the Japanese heart. He worked in various media, refusing to be defined, and his work is as eccentric as it is unique, and highly sought in Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pre 2000 item #933257 (stock #352)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Spectacular Hi-iro defines this sake set by Konishi Toko II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Various shades of color scorch the undecorated flame licked raw earth. A pleasure to drink from in every aspect, every cup offering a new facet. The tokkuri is 5-1/2 inches (14 cm) tall, cups 2-1/4 inches (6 cm) diameter and all is in perfect condition. Toko, of course, learned from his father Toko I (1899-1954) and was succeeded by his own son Toko III.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #932834 (stock #351)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fine Nerikomi work by Living National Treasure Matsui Kosei (1927-2003) enclosed in the original signed and stamped wooden box. The surface has a soft sheen, like the effect of being carved from gray marble. It measures 17 x 12 x 3 inches (43 x 30.6 x 7 cm), in perfect condition. Matsui was born in 1927, beginning his ceramic studies in 1946. In 1957, he became a priest at the Getsusoji Temple, where in 1960 he built a kiln so he could research traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean ceramics. Subsequently, he became famous for neriage (designs in colored clays mixed together), based on Tang Dynasty Chinese techniques. In 1993, he was declared a Living National Treasure for his efforts in Neriage.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Cups : Contemporary item #921362 (stock #351)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Sitg White crystalline glaze clings to the purple pitted sides of this fantastic set of 3 Mentori Shu-hai sake cups made especially for an exhibition in 2004 by Kato Toyohisa enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Enclosed is the original exhibition invitation showing a similar set. 1 cup is 5 inches (12 cm) tall, 4-1/2 inches (11 cm) diameter; the others are roughly 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) tall, 4 inches (10 cm) diameter. Toyohisa was born in 1962. His work is both original and fresh and his challenging pursuit of Mino ceramics is evident in both his contemporary pieces and his traditional ones. He first exhibited at the Asahi Ceramics Exhibition in 1983, and was awarded the rising star award. That same year he was awarded at the Tajimi City (home to innumerable Mino potteries) Art Exhibition. He has also exhibited and or been prized at the Tokai Dento Kogei ten, Mino Togei Ten, Issui Kai Ten and Gendai Chato Ten (modern Tea Ceramics Exhibition). In addition is a long list of Private exhibitions both domestic and abroad.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #915551 (stock #340)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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The bodacious designs dominating the bold forms of Miyake Yojis work have drawn him many fans, one of which is this gallery owner, and this is a fine example enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase is 12 x 6 x 9 inches tall (30 x 15 x 23 cm). Born in Shimane in 1950, He studied from 1974 under Ito Kosho, establishing himself as an independent artist three years later in Mashiko. In 1979 his work was accepted into the Dento Kogei Shinsaku Ten (New Exhibition of Traditional Crafts) and displayed there annually thereafter. In 1980 he was accepted into the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition), and many times thereafter. Again the following year he was accepted into yet another major exhibition with the Nihon Togei Ten (All Japan Ceramic Exhibition), once again followed up with repeated acceptance there. Yet in the 90s he turned away from the competitive world and began to concentrate more on private exhibitions, of which he has been hosted many times in some of Japans most prestigious galleries. He was also the subject of an NHK Television Documentary in 1998 and appeared in another in 2000.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #915480 (stock #339)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Maple leaves swirl in a vortex on this large rectangular platter by Ando Hidetake enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Rich iron leaves seem to float on or just below the surface as if floating in a pond, the suction from a surfacing carp drawing down, pulling the leaves around it. Excellent for display or use, it is 17 x 10-1/2 inches (43 x 26 cm) and is in excellent condition. Hidetake was born third generation into a Mino pottery family in Gifu prefecture in 1938. He began an apprenticeship under Kato Tokuro in 1960. A testament to his skill, he was accepted for the first time four years later into the National Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten), and followed that by taking governors prize at the Asahi Ceramics exhibition in 1970, and acceptance into the Japanese National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togei Ten) in 1971; since he has displayed often with all of these important events. One of a small group of potters credited with the revival of Shino, he was named an Important Prefectural Cultural Property in 2003 (Gifu-Ken Juyo Mukei Bunkazai, the prefectural version of the Living National Treasure).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Contemporary item #915271 (stock #338)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A proud striated egg shaped orb floats above the square block forming the base of this sculpture by Matsumoto Hideo covered with enigmatic graffito. The object is 12-1/2 inches (31.5 cm) tall, 4 x 7 inches (11 x 18 cm) at the base, and is in excellent condition. This piece was purchased from an exhibition held in October, 1993, and a copy of a Newspaper article introducing the exhibition is enclosed with the piece. Hideo has been widely represented in Museum exhibitions throughout Japan. He was born in the 1950s, when Sodeisha was leading the charge away from traditionalism and function to form, and this has had a lasting effect on his work, which is largely sculptural, often beyond recognition. This piece comes in a tag-board box.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1990 item #914996 (stock #337)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Haunting shapes are scraped into the raw clay like some ancient Nazcan riddle on this huge ball vase by Sato Kazuhiko. The vase is 15-1/2 inches (40 cm) tall, 17 inches (43 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. There is no box. Kazuhiko (b. 1947) is a widely displayed artist and author of many books on the ceramic arts. For more information on this artist see Modern Japanese Ceramics in American Collections (1993). Due to size this piece will require special shipping consideration.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Pre 2000 item #879132 (stock #313)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A large sculpted image of the goddess of mercy Kannon cut from a solid slab of Iga clay by artist Kishimoto Kennin. The image is 12-1/2 inches (31.5 cm) tall and in perfect condition. The artists mark is engraved into the base of the back; there is no box. This artist has been working with clay since the 1950s, devouring styles along the way. Seto, Oribe, Iga and Celadon, all very different approaches which he masters one at a time, extending his unique view of the arts to new realms, and moving on to the next challenge when his appetite and personal genius has been satiated. He was exhibited and prized at the National Japanese Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten), National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togei Ten), Chunichi International Ceramics Exhibition (Chunichi Kokusai Togei Ten) and Asahi Togei Ten among others, and is held in several important international collections.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #867953 (stock #311)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Enigmatic green and red florals capped by ascending butterflies alternate with bird images in the cathedral-like windows on the side of this large vessel by Kyoto artist Yamazaki Koyo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase is 13-1/2 inches (34 cm) tall and in fine condition, dating circa 1950. Koyo (1890-1979) studied under Kiyomizu Rokubei VI, and was displayed consistently in many National and Local Exhibitions. He has been awarded four times at the Nitten, twice at the Nihon Shin Kogei Ten (Japanese National New Craft Exhibition) as well as the Kofukai and is held in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art Boston and Bern Museum of Art Switzerland among others
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #867017 (stock #310)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Splashes of earthen color decorate the deep sides of this large open dish by Living National Treasure Tamura Koichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The bowl is 15-1/2 (39 cm) diameter, 4 inches (10.5 cm) tall. The box is worn but still sturdy, and the bowl is in perfect condition. Koichi graduated from the Tokyo University of Fine arts Where he later taught), and took up an apprenticeship under (later) Living National Treasure Tomimoto Kenkichi. With a very impressive career, Koichi too was designated a Living National Treasure for work with iron glaze the year before his death, 1986.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #855333 (stock #305)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A truly Massive chozara Oribe Platter by important potter Ando Hidetake (b. 1938) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Relying entirely on sculptural presentation, the interior is devoid of any decoration, the heavily sculpted basin simply coated with glassy-green oribe glaze. Deep grooves have been cut from the slab of clay, the edges torn and ragged with dollops of green dripping from the base. On the underside in dark iron is the large character Hi (the first character in the artists name) inside an earthen cartouche. The dish is 33 x 15-1/2 x 2-3/4 inches (84 x 39 x 7 cm) and in excellent condition. It is very heavy, over 15 kilograms with the box, and will require special shipping considerations (cost of shipping is separate from item price). Hidetake was born third generation into a Mino pottery family in Gifu prefecture in 1938. He began an apprenticeship under Kato Tokuro in 1960. A testament to his skill, he was accepted for the first time four years later into the National Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten), and followed that by taking governors prize at the Asahi Ceramics exhibition in 1970, and acceptance into the Japanese National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togei Ten) in 1971; since he has displayed often with all of these important events. One of a small group of potters credited with the revival of Shino, he was named an Important Prefectural Cultural Property in 2003 (Gifu-Ken Juyo Mukei Bunkazai, the prefectural version of the Living National Treasure). Due to size the cost of shipping will be assessed separately from the list price.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #853402 (stock #300)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A huge museum quality pottery vase by Konishi Yohei (b.1941) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tokoname Sen-Jomon Tsubo. The vase is 17-1/2 inches (45 cm) tall, roughly the same diameter and weighs 14 kg (30 lbs). It is in excellent condition, dating circa 1990. Yohei was born the son of Konishi Yusen in Tokoname city, graduating the Tokoname Ceramics institute in 1959. He was first accepted into the Modern Japan Ceramics Exhibition (Gendai Togeiten) in 1960 and has since racked up a tremendous list of exhibitions. Those include the Nitten, Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition) and Asahi Togei Ceramics Exhibition. Also the Nihon Mingei Ten, Sanki-Kai Ten(prized), Issui-Kai Ten and Chunichi Kokusai Togei Ten (prized). Barollis French International Exhibition (silver prize). Shipping will be considered separately due to size.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #837253 (stock #291)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A heavily glazed early square pottery dish by Kimura Ichiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The sandy clay appears to have been twice fired, the first firing unglazed with a simple ash burn later a very thick feldspathick glaze wiped on and re-fired. It is roughly 11 by 11-1/2 x 2-1/2 inches (28 x 29 x 6 cm) and is in good condition, no chips or cracks but some color has soaked into the crackled white glaze. Originally from Mashiko, Kimura Ichiro (1915-1988) went to study ceramics at the Kyoto ceramic research institute, as had his forbearer Hamada Shoji, to whom he later apprenticed, establishing his own kiln in 1946 at the close of World War II. Along with Shoji and later Tatsuzo, He was one of the founders of modern Mashiko pottery and was displayed and awarded prolifically during his lifetime. Those include the Nihon Mingei ten, Gendai Tougei ten, National Tojiki ten, and National Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #835558 (stock #290)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Hi-dasuki lines of red charring streak across the surface of this large Tokkuri Vase by Isezaki Mitsuru (b. 1934) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A smooth even profusion of bubbles welter about the clay, adding a tactile texture to the elongated body. The vase is over 20 inches (51.5 cm) tall and in perfect condition. Mitsuru was born to a family of potters, his father Yozan and brother Jun both very important in Bizen pottery. In 1998 Mitsuru was named a Prefectural Intangible Cultural Property for Okayama (the prefectural version of a living National Treasure, likely more important as it is truly based on the artists contributions rather than heredity). He has innumerable exhibitions, including the Nihon Togei-Ten (National Ceramics Exhibition) Nihon Dento Kogei-Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition) and Gendai Togei Ten (Modern Japanese Ceramics Exhibition). In fact his first piece exhibited with the First National Ceramic Exhibition was selected for display in a show which went around the globe. Recipient of the Kaneshige Toyo prize as well as purchased by the Japanese Foreign service as gift to foreign dignitaries.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #812233 (stock #277)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A large and lovely platter by Koyama Kiyoko enclosed in the original signed wooden box.  The wavelike surface traps the thick crystalline ash glaze in deep green pools, the edges left raw and exposed.  The excessive amount of glaze is typical of this artists work, and she is known for firing her kiln for up to 14 days straight.  The dish is roughly 1 foot (30 cm) square and in excellent condition.  Kiyoko was the subject of the film Hi-Bi (2005) and is the pioneering female wood firing artist in Japan. Born in Sasebo, Nagasakin in 1938, she went to Shigaraki village, home of one of Japans Six Ancient Kilns (RokkoGama).  There she studied the traditional techniques,, and bore the brunt of centuries of discrimination against women.  Through it all she persevered to become one of the most highly sought of Shigaraki potters. It is a true pleasure to be able to offer this piece.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #794234 (stock #265)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A striking large Han-zutsu Shino bowl by Kato Kageaki with cotton buffer and silk bag enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Linear forms lie shadowlike below the thick pitted shino glaze burnt red on the edges, the body torn and cut creating a vivacious landscape for the senses. The bowl is 5-1/2 inches (14 cm) diameter, 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) tall and in perfect condition. It comes wrapped in a custom fitted silk bag with a central cotton tuft, showing the high esteem and value lavished on the bowl. Kageaki (1899-1972) was the 12th generation head of the Kato clan, his ancestor Kagemitsu being the first of the Mino potters, establishing the family kiln in 1574. He was named a Prefectural Living Treasure (properly called Mukei Bunkazai or Intangible Cultural Property) in 1958. He was often displayed at and prized at the National Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogeiten) and was a member of the Nihon Kogei Kai. His torch was passed to his son Kato Seizo and Mizuno Takuzo among others. The kiln is now headed by his grandson, the 14th generation head of the family Kato Yasukage.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1990 item #769037 (stock #240)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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We have been long searching after a larger vessel by Morihiro, and at last we have found one to offer. This is a peculiarly shaped vessel decorated with swirling designs in a fractured circle layed over impressed clay and enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The form is quite unique, the split circle motif actually falling from the center around the mouth to form the opposite side. Not apparent when viewing from the side but easily distinguished from above. It is signed on the base and measures 11 inches (28 cm) tall, 9-1/2 by 5 inches (24 x 13 cm) and is in perfect condition. Wada was born in Hyogo prefecture and apprenticed under Kyotos Tomimoto Kenkichi before moving to his current location in 1976. He has been displayed at the Nihon Togei Ten (National Ceramics Exhibition), Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition) Gold medal at the Florence International Ceramics Exhibition in 1980 as well as being dispayed at the Victoria Albert and Smithsonian as one representative of modern Japanese ceramics in 1983. He subsequently recieved the Japanese Ceramic Society Award in 1985, a very rare honor.