Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1491123 (stock #YM001)
An undulating ceramic sculpture of overlapping layers reminiscent of a scholar stone by Yamaguchi Mio titled Wakuraba. Wakuraba is a word from the Manyoshu, it implies a leaf which has changed color due to age or insects (like a late summer leaf yellowing in comparison to leaves around it) or on a completely different level can mean to suddenly and unexpectedly meet. It is roughly 38 cm (15 inches) diameter, 83 cm (32-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist. This piece was runner up for top prize at the Kasama Ceramic Triennale.
Due to size the cost of shipping will be accrued separately.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1486271 (stock #HT18)
A truly one of a kind sculpture of three stacking pottery objects in oxidized color by rising star Hashimoto Tomonari. The only work like this the artist has yet produced, it is 82 cm (32 inches) tall and all in excellent condition, directly from the artist this year. We have many photos of the individual pieces from all angles if you would like to see them. Please inquire.
Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1490969 (stock #YM022)
A massive Blue Sculpture titled Sway by Yamaguchi Mio created as a reflection of the layered growth of organic forms such as shells and pine cones. Inspired by this natural growth, her work is likened to life in the depths of the ocean, along the seashore, of the layers of earth itself. She has made few works in blue, one of which is currently on display at the Chicago Art Institute for those in the area. This is a masterpiece. It is 74 cm (29 inches) tall, roughly 37 cm (15 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, accompanied by a signed wooden placard directly from the artist. We have a plethora of photos of this piece, for more please email.
Due to size this will require special shipping consideration.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at University, her works were selected for show at the Joryu Togei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1491634 (stock #YM012)
A wild pottery sculpture by Yamaguchi Mio titled Manimani (every moment), the sandy terracotta colored clay completely unadorned, rising from three feet like some exotic earthen flower. It is 40 x 50 x 59.5 cm and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist dating from 2023. It comes with a signed wooden placard.
Due to size, the cost of shipping will be accrued separately.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1491731 (stock #YM007)
A large Kokuto scalloping sculpture on three adjoined pedestal feet by Yamaguchi Mio titled Taiji no Yume (Fetal Dream)dating from late 2023. Here the young artist has ventured into black clay, eschewing altogether glaze of any kind. What you have is simply the direct, dark clay and the earthen texture, with no frills or decoration. It is 40 x 43 x 60 cm (16 x 17 x 24 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist. It comes with a signed wooden placard.
Due to size and weight this will require special shipping consideration.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489646 (stock #MC705)
Caribbean-Blue glass fills this crusty earthen bowl by Ogawa Machiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Saiyu Bachi. It is roughly 27cm (11 inches) diameter, 10 cm (4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ogawa Machiko was born in Sapporo on the Northern Island of Hokkaido in 1946. She studied under future Living National Treasures Fujimoto Yoshimichi, Tamura Koichi and Kato Hajime at the Tokyo University of Arts, graduating in 1969, then went on to further studies in France and Africa, returning to Japan in 1975. She began garnering attention in the mid eighties, and has since become one of the leading female figures in Japanese pottery. She was awarded the JCS prize in 2001, one of Japans most prestigious awards. Work by her is held in the Brooklyn Art Museum, LACMA, New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, Smith College, MIA, MOMAT and a host of others. For more see “Touch Fire, Contemporary Ceramics by Women Artists” (2009) or Toh, volume 67 (1993). For more information see the current exhibition Radical Clay at the Chicago Art Institute.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1485417 (stock #MC359)
An exquisite work of art like an opalized tear drop by Hashimoto Tomonari enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 54 cm (21-1/2 inches) tall, 26 cm (10 inches) diameter and in perfect condition.
Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1485416 (stock #MC358)
A spectacular work in the shape of a curved wall covered in a galaxy of color by Hashimoto Tomonari enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 51 x 16 x 29 cm (20 x 6 x 11-1/2 inches) and is in perfect condition, directly from the artist. Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1486455 (stock #HT08)
An unusual cubic work by Hashimoto Tomonari in which he has altered his normal process to allow a powerful crusted texture to form on the work. Oxidized in shades of blue and rusty orange. It is 30 x 34 x 33.5 cm (12 x 13-1/2 x 13-1/2 inches) and in excellent condition, directly from the artist accompanied by a signed wooden placard.
Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1485551 (stock #HT15)
Wow! A wide slab banded with galactic color which stands at a striking angle, challenging our sense of spatial cognizance by Hashimoto Tomonari. Created in 2023, it is 48 x 15 x 37 cm (18 x 6 x 14-1/2 inches) and is in prefect condition, directly from the artist. It comes with a signed wooden placard titled, as are all his sculptures, untitled.
Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1491820 (stock #YM028)
This amazing piece, fresh from the kiln in April, is titled Mio, perhaps a play on the artists name, this kanji character meaning water which has pooled and collected. When looking at this piece, all the glaze has run down the body, filling the scalloping exfoliation with pools of lapiz blue. It is 27 x 30 x 58 cm (11 x 12 x 23 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Due to size this will require special shipping consideration.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1485419 (stock #MC360)
A 30 cm (1 foot) square cube in oxidized lunar color by Hashimoto Tomonari enclosed in the original signed wooden box. By volume this seems in person much larger than it actually is. Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1486053 (stock #HT32)
A rusted and oxidized ceramic cube by Hashimoto Tomonari enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is roughly 30 cm (1 foot) cubed, and in perfect condition, directly from the artist.
Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489818 (stock #MC715)
The inside of this bowl has been glazed, the exterior left in raw clay before the entire was dipped in white gold, creating a stark contrast between inner and outer surfaces by Ogawa Machiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakukinsai Hachi. It is 14.5cm (just under 6 inches) wide 8cm (3-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ogawa Machiko was born in Sapporo on the Northern Island of Hokkaido in 1946. She studied under future Living National Treasures Fujimoto Yoshimichi, Tamura Koichi and Kato Hajime at the Tokyo University of Arts, graduating in 1969, then went on to further studies in France and Africa, returning to Japan in 1975. She began garnering attention in the mid eighties, and has since become one of the leading female figures in Japanese pottery. She was awarded the JCS prize in 2001, one of Japans most prestigious awards. Work by her is held in the Brooklyn Art Museum, LACMA, New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, Smith College, MIA, MOMAT and a host of others. For more see “Touch Fire, Contemporary Ceramics by Women Artists” (2009) or Toh, volume 67 (1993). For more information see the current exhibition Radical Clay at the Chicago Art Institute.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1490916 (stock #YM024)
A tall fluted ceramic sculpture by Yamaguchi Mio titled Memory dating from 2020. Green glaze covers the stalk and pools in the raw clay scallops. It is 61.5 cm (over 2 feet) tall and is in excellent condition, accompanied by a signed placard directly from the artist.
Due to size, the price does not include shipping cost.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1491567 (stock #YM009)
A raw black-clay sculpture rising vigorously to the occasion by Yamaguchi Mio titled Carpe Diem dating to later in 2023. It is 31 x 33.5 x 58.5 cm (12 x 13 x 23 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist. It comes with a signed wooden placard.
Due to size and weight this will require special shipping consideration.
Yamaguchi Mio was born in Aichi prefecture in 1992, and graduated advanced studies at the Aichi University of Education in 2017. While still at university, her works were selected for show at the JoryuTogei Ten Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition (2014). In 2016 she was awarded at the 3rd Kogei in Kanazawa Competition, Grand Prize at the Ceramic Art in the Present Tense Exhibition at the Hagi Uragami Museum as well received the governors prize at the 5oth Female Ceramic Artist Association Exhibition. In 2017 she was selected for the 11th International Ceramics Competition in Mino. She took a job as a teacher, but could not fight the need to create, so enrolled in the Tajimi City Ceramics research facility, graduating in2020. Her work is currently on view in the Chicago Institute of Arts, and was featured on the cover of the catalog for that exhibition, Radical Clay.
According to Mio: I feel that my fascination towards the natural world’s use of repetition, in bee hives and on the surface of corals, appears in my work as I consume and absorb the world around me. I like to believe that these works are natural forms made by my own hands. When I mold clay, I have a sensation that my body and consciousness blends and binds with the material and the natural world. The process of building upon each coil and applying each fold one by one with my hands is a form of meditation. Through this repetitive process I want to be able to convey my thoughts at the time in the texture, such as my struggle of swaying between the desires to live freely and falling under the pressure from societal expectations. It calms me down to observe the fingerprints left in the surface and see the traces of my existence in the clay. These works are products of what I have absorbed around me.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1493301 (stock #MC141)
An architectural pottery sculpture made up of undulating walls delineating chambers within by Aso Rando titled Catfish. It is tantalizingly sculpted, the various rooms of squared clay walls belying the organic, undulating form of the fish. The sculpture is 22 x 10-1/2 x 7 inches (56 x 26.5 x 18 cm) and is in excellent condition. It comes with a signed placard by the artist.
Aso Rando was born in Nara in 1983. Finishing the Kanazawa College of Art in 2009 led to a year in research at the Tokoname Municipal Research Facility before settling in Tajimi city. He first exhibited with the 45th Chunichi Ceramics exhibition in 2006, but has chosen a different path from the normal large national exhibitions, focusing on more regional or trendy showings (such as the Art Program, Hyogo and Nichukan Tougei Shinsedai KokanTen Inter-Asian Young Artists Exposition) where there is more interaction with the viewing public.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1485420 (stock #MC361)
A breathtaking sculpture by Hashimoto Tomonari enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The inverted cone is dark gray with rust red and blue patterns waving across the surface like gas clouds on some distant moon. It is 46 cm (18 inches) tall, 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, directly from the artist this winter. The wooden box is titled: Untitled. In fact he does not title any of his work now, preferring to leave interpretation up to the viewer. After hand forming and sculpting the shapes, they are bisque fired, then glazed and fired again at a relatively low temperature (Between 1000 and 1100 degrees, like Raku ware). Then he builds a brick oven around each piece and brings the temperature up to 500 degrees, and adds millet or rice husk, which carbonizes the surface, creating incredible colors and random patterns leaving the viewer with a feeling like rusted or heated metal. Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is making international waves around the world. Work by him is held in the V&A in London, LACMA and a large sculpture has recently been installed in his home prefecture of Wakayama.