Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #1057858 (stock #410)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Enigmatic lines score the martian landscape of this large slab platter by innovative Japanese artist Teramoto Mamoru enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The slab measures 53.5 x 16.5 x 5 cm (21 x 6-1/2 x 2 inches) and is in perfect condition. The box itself is a testament toteh value placed on it by the artist, double the thickness of a usual box and of a fine grade of kiri. The moonscape style is haunting, and Mamoru is a must for any modern Japanese ceramic collection.
Mamoru (1949-present) born in Kanagawa prefecture, initially worked at the Kasama Kobayashi Research Facility after graduating the Tokyo Craft Design Institute. Later he apprenticed under the instruction of both Matsumoto Saichi of Kutani, and Miura Isamu. He established his own kiln in 1976 in Kasama. His works have been displayed and prized at the Nihon Dento Kogeiten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibtion), Nihon Togei Ten (National Ceramics Exhibition) as well as the Shinsaku Ten (New Crafts Exhibition). For more information on this artist see the Catalog from the Nancy Fitz-Gerald Collection.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1055211 (stock #407)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An unusual vase with rough, pebble textured pink glaze over scratched in cranes by one of Japans most important post-war artists, Shinkai Kanzan, enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The shape and the design are exactly what we would expect from Kanzan, the coloring going even a step beyond. The texture is like unpolished jewels, the inside of a geode; very pleasing to the hands. The vase is 20.5 cm (8 inches) tall, 18 cm (7inches) diameter and in prefect condition.
Shinkai Kanzan was born the grandson of Seifu Yohei III in 1912 and was raised from a baby in the confines of the Gojo-zaka ceramic district of Kyoto, inducted daily into the realm of pottery by his father and grandfather. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, and moved on to study painting (after his fathers urging) before returning to ceramics under Kiyomizu Rokubei V and Vi. He was first accepted into the Teiten (later Nitten) National Exhibition in 1930, and was displayed there consistently thereafter as well as others, being prized at the 1939 San Francisco Exposition. Just as he was beginning to take off as an artist, he was drafted and sent to China, whereafter he spent three years in a Russian Gulag in Siberia. Upon his return to Japan, he branched out on his own; with a unique vision grounded in the roots of the training and instruction he had receved before the war, but with a new style and concept to differentiate himself from his peers. In 1951 he was recognized with the Gold Award at the Japanese Art Expo. Following many prizes, In 1974 he was granted the Governors prize at the Nitten, and in 1980 the Niohon Geijutsu-in Sho (Japanese Art Academy prize). In 1989 he was awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Cultural Order of Merit for his life-long endeavors. Works by him are held in the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #994278 (stock #404)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A jagged metallic shard has embedded into the lavender shaded side of this deep Shiro-Hagi Chawan by Miwa Kazuhiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The sheered metallic ring gleems softly gold in the light, a stark contrast against the moon-like glow of the body. The bowl is both sculptural and functional, the best combination. It measures 4 inches (10.5 cm) deep, 5 inches (12 cm) diameter and is in perfect condition. I hope you will take time to see the box being offered by his brother Miwa Eizo (1946-1999) in our inventory as well. Kazuhiko likely needs no introduction. Born into the family of living National Treasure Miwa Kyusettsu, he was not only heavily influenced by his father, but by his 5 years at the San Francisco Art Institute where he was able to acquire a novel eye in his approach toward the traditional Hagi style. He has a list of exhibitions much too long to state here, both inside and outside Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #993682 (stock #403)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A large Egg shaped Zogan vase by Kobayashi Seiji enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Enigmatic lines score the oblong body, the map-like surface filled with blue, green and silver. Seiji is best known for this Zogan technique, and this work is a superb example. It measures 11-1/2 inches (29 cm) long, 7 inches (18.5 cm) tall and is in perfect condition. Seiji (b. 1945) studied initially at the Nagoya Research Facility. He moved to Kasama in 1979. In addition to a long list pf private exhibitions his works have been exhibited at Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition), Nihon Togei Ten (NationalCeramics Exhibition) and he won top prize at the 1985 New Zealand International Ceramics Exhibition.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #984536 (stock #394)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A superb example of the work of Kimura Morinobu enclosed in the original sgned wooden box. The cream colored crackle glaze is speckeld with flecks of iron an ishihaze with five Zen circles around the circumference, subtly calling to mind the Book of Five Rings (Miyamoto Musashi). The deep crevaces in the glaze and heafty load of the bowl are a pleasure to behold. It is 5 inches (13 cm) diameter, 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) tall and in fine condition. Morinobu (b. 1932) was one of the born into a pottery family in Kyotos Higashiyama pottery district. He attended the Kyoto Municipal School of Art graduating from the sculpture division, and entered the Kyoto Ceramic Research Facility, the stomping grounds of so many of the brightest talents in modern Japanese Pottery. After apprenticing under bothhis brother, Morikazu, and Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi, he established his own kiln in 1967. Although his list of exhibitions is much too long to put down here, he was named an intangible Cultural Property (Mukei Bunkazai) of Kyoto Prefecture in 1992. Works by the artist are held in the Kyoto National Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #979657 (stock #388)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Striking black flashes of oil-spot glaze surface on this Tetsu-yu Tessai Tsubo by Shimizu Yasutaka enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The speckeled Rust red-orange body is like looking on fire or smoldering coals from a distance. The pot is 14 inches (35 cm) tall, 12 inches (30 cm) diameter and in fine condition, purchased at the Mitsukoshi Department Store Gallery Exhibition in 2006. Yasutaka was born into the pottery household of future Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi in 1947. Although always involved in pottery, he began his official apprenticeship in the plastic arts under his fathers tutelage after graduating Ryukoku University in 1971. One year later his first piece was accepted in National competition at the Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogeiten). The following year he was awarded the first of many awards at the second Kinki Area Nnihon Kogei Kai Exhibition. In 1975 he was accepted into theNihon Togei Ten (National Ceramics Exhibition). He has a constant following in the world of Private exhibitions, and his work is held by Kyoto Prefecture.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #974831 (stock #379)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A slight deviation from the norm, here is a scroll depicting the character Tsubo by Shigaraki artist Koie Ryoji in liquid strokes, the outer lines dissipating into the paper canvas. Ink on paper in a dark cloth border and unusual metal glazed ceramic rollers. It measures 19 1/2 by 42 inches (49, 5 x 107 cm) and is in fine condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #973927 (stock #379)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A charming baluster form vase decorated with a ring of drying fish by Katsuo Seiryudo (1907-1984) in the original signed wooden box. The hirame (flat fish) are unglazed except for an iron like underglaze used to draw the details, and shiny black dots for eyes. The contrast between the unglazed fish and white ceramic is unexpected and pleasing, in that ordinarily it would be opposite. The vase measures roughly 8-1/2 inches (21.5 cm) in diameter and height, and bears the artists cartouche-like stamp inside the foot. Seiryudo, originally of Hiroshima, graduated the Tokyo school of Art, Western Style Painting Department, and moved to Kyoto in 1930 to begin working in ceramics. His works were hailed at both prefectural and National exhibitions including the prestigious Bunten and Nitten.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #971884 (stock #375)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Here is a quintessential piece by Master Mashiko Potter and Living National Treasure Hamada Shoji (1894-1978) enclosed in the original signed and stamped wooden box. The subtlety of the wide faces is a pleasant contrast with the rich iron frame of the narrow sides and top. A cluster of leaves in a zen circle underscored or shaded by tapering rails under heavily crackled clear glaze, a snowy white belt running across the scene is what we see. However there is more to this vase, a subtle texture of faint trenches can be felt running at varying angles and curves up the opposing faces. Color seems to be draining from the lip, collecting in a pool of blue, brown and gold on top and flowing down the thin sides. The vase is 4-3/4 by 3 by 7-3/4 inches tall (12.5 x 7.5 x 19.5 cm) and is in perfect condition. Hamada Shoji was born in Tokyo, and enrolled in the Tokyo Technical University at the age of 19. In 1918 he met the important British potter Bernard Leach, and the history of ceramic arts was forever changed. One of the most influential and sought after of all Japanese Ceramic artists. There is no shortage of reading material for those who would like to learn more about this potter.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #970539 (stock #372)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A large Hidasuki Bizen Table by Shibaoka Nobuyoshi enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Two large circles beyond the burnt-straw remains gives the effect of the moon reflecting off water viewed through a rush of bamboo. The table is 17-1/2 by 9-1/2 by 4 inches (44 x 24.5 x 10 cm) and is in excellent condition. Nobuyoshi was born in 1950, the son of Ikkai. He graduated the Bizen Industrial High School and went on to apprentice at the Bizen Ceramics Research Institute followed by training under his grandfather Kozan II as well as under the tutelage of his father. He has been often prized at the Okayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has displayed with the Issui-kai, Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition), Nihon Togei Ten (National Ceramics Exhibition) as well as the Chunichi Kokusai Kogei Ten.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pre 2000 item #957948 (stock #364)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A very large Kutani Vase decorated by eccentric Zen Priest and painter Shimizu Kosho enclosed in the original sgned wooden box. The outer surfaceis covered in genuine gold, overwhich has been brushed the decorative calligraphy reading……Hana mushin Maneku chocho, mushin tazuneru shin. The box lid is attributed within to having been fired at the Kutani Shoryu kiln by Kosho himself, and the pot is signed on the base Ryu. The vase is over 12 inches (31 cm) tall, 9 inches (22 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. Kosho (1911-1999) was a unique and prolific artist-priest studied in the eccentric painting style associated with Nara. He was long time abbot of the massive Todai-ji temple complex in Nara, home of the great Buddha. Like many priests, he began producing art to propogate his teachings later in life. He proved extremely popular, the nonchalant style plucking a string in the Japanese heart. He worked in various media, refusing to be defined, and his work is as eccentric as it is unique, and highly sought in Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pre 2000 item #933257 (stock #352)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Spectacular Hi-iro defines this sake set by Konishi Toko II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Various shades of color scorch the undecorated flame licked raw earth. A pleasure to drink from in every aspect, every cup offering a new facet. The tokkuri is 5-1/2 inches (14 cm) tall, cups 2-1/4 inches (6 cm) diameter and all is in perfect condition. Toko, of course, learned from his father Toko I (1899-1954) and was succeeded by his own son Toko III.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #932834 (stock #351)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fine Nerikomi work by Living National Treasure Matsui Kosei (1927-2003) enclosed in the original signed and stamped wooden box. The surface has a soft sheen, like the effect of being carved from gray marble. It measures 17 x 12 x 3 inches (43 x 30.6 x 7 cm), in perfect condition. Matsui was born in 1927, beginning his ceramic studies in 1946. In 1957, he became a priest at the Getsusoji Temple, where in 1960 he built a kiln so he could research traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean ceramics. Subsequently, he became famous for neriage (designs in colored clays mixed together), based on Tang Dynasty Chinese techniques. In 1993, he was declared a Living National Treasure for his efforts in Neriage.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Cups : Contemporary item #921362 (stock #351)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Sitg White crystalline glaze clings to the purple pitted sides of this fantastic set of 3 Mentori Shu-hai sake cups made especially for an exhibition in 2004 by Kato Toyohisa enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Enclosed is the original exhibition invitation showing a similar set. 1 cup is 5 inches (12 cm) tall, 4-1/2 inches (11 cm) diameter; the others are roughly 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) tall, 4 inches (10 cm) diameter. Toyohisa was born in 1962. His work is both original and fresh and his challenging pursuit of Mino ceramics is evident in both his contemporary pieces and his traditional ones. He first exhibited at the Asahi Ceramics Exhibition in 1983, and was awarded the rising star award. That same year he was awarded at the Tajimi City (home to innumerable Mino potteries) Art Exhibition. He has also exhibited and or been prized at the Tokai Dento Kogei ten, Mino Togei Ten, Issui Kai Ten and Gendai Chato Ten (modern Tea Ceramics Exhibition). In addition is a long list of Private exhibitions both domestic and abroad.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #915551 (stock #340)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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The bodacious designs dominating the bold forms of Miyake Yojis work have drawn him many fans, one of which is this gallery owner, and this is a fine example enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase is 12 x 6 x 9 inches tall (30 x 15 x 23 cm). Born in Shimane in 1950, He studied from 1974 under Ito Kosho, establishing himself as an independent artist three years later in Mashiko. In 1979 his work was accepted into the Dento Kogei Shinsaku Ten (New Exhibition of Traditional Crafts) and displayed there annually thereafter. In 1980 he was accepted into the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition), and many times thereafter. Again the following year he was accepted into yet another major exhibition with the Nihon Togei Ten (All Japan Ceramic Exhibition), once again followed up with repeated acceptance there. Yet in the 90s he turned away from the competitive world and began to concentrate more on private exhibitions, of which he has been hosted many times in some of Japans most prestigious galleries. He was also the subject of an NHK Television Documentary in 1998 and appeared in another in 2000.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #915480 (stock #339)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Maple leaves swirl in a vortex on this large rectangular platter by Ando Hidetake enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Rich iron leaves seem to float on or just below the surface as if floating in a pond, the suction from a surfacing carp drawing down, pulling the leaves around it. Excellent for display or use, it is 17 x 10-1/2 inches (43 x 26 cm) and is in excellent condition. Hidetake was born third generation into a Mino pottery family in Gifu prefecture in 1938. He began an apprenticeship under Kato Tokuro in 1960. A testament to his skill, he was accepted for the first time four years later into the National Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten), and followed that by taking governors prize at the Asahi Ceramics exhibition in 1970, and acceptance into the Japanese National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togei Ten) in 1971; since he has displayed often with all of these important events. One of a small group of potters credited with the revival of Shino, he was named an Important Prefectural Cultural Property in 2003 (Gifu-Ken Juyo Mukei Bunkazai, the prefectural version of the Living National Treasure).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Contemporary item #915271 (stock #338)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A proud striated egg shaped orb floats above the square block forming the base of this sculpture by Matsumoto Hideo covered with enigmatic graffito. The object is 12-1/2 inches (31.5 cm) tall, 4 x 7 inches (11 x 18 cm) at the base, and is in excellent condition. This piece was purchased from an exhibition held in October, 1993, and a copy of a Newspaper article introducing the exhibition is enclosed with the piece. Hideo has been widely represented in Museum exhibitions throughout Japan. He was born in the 1950s, when Sodeisha was leading the charge away from traditionalism and function to form, and this has had a lasting effect on his work, which is largely sculptural, often beyond recognition. This piece comes in a tag-board box.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1990 item #914996 (stock #337)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Haunting shapes are scraped into the raw clay like some ancient Nazcan riddle on this huge ball vase by Sato Kazuhiko. The vase is 15-1/2 inches (40 cm) tall, 17 inches (43 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. There is no box. Kazuhiko (b. 1947) is a widely displayed artist and author of many books on the ceramic arts. For more information on this artist see Modern Japanese Ceramics in American Collections (1993). Due to size this piece will require special shipping consideration.