Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1469886 (stock #MC027)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A dramatic Shino Mizusashi covered in flowing glaze by Sakai Kobu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 20 cm tall, 19cm diameter and in excellent condition.
“I follow no teacher. I take no disciples. Independent, I don't get along well with public exhibitions”. Kobu Sakai from Toki City, one of Japan’s ceramic heartlands, has mastered Shino through self-study. He succeeded a kiln mass producing generic pottery, but decided he wanted to make his own works. “I walked around the nearby mountains and fields. Any piece of pottery that I encountered in an old kiln became my teacher. His works have been shown in solo exhibitions at department stores, and in 2002, he was designated as an intangible cultural property of Toki City. The 85 year old is well known for developing in the 1990s a blue Shino glaze using Cobalt and Iron Oxides known as Heki-Shino which shocked traditional ideas.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1469867 (stock #MC004)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A brilliantly colored bowl studded with shiseki and slashes of black by Banura Shiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 14 cm diameter, 7 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Banura Shiro (1941-2001) was born the fourth son of influential Lacquer Artist Banura Shogo. His sensitivity to textures may stem from that exacting influence. Although his older brother succeeded the family tradition (another branching into paper arts), Shiro, after graduating the Kyoto University of Fine Art, apprenticed in the plastic arts under Kawamura Kitaro (1899-1966) who was a student of Kitaoji Rosanjin. Rosanjin, a restaurateur, artist, and overall renaissance man believed the dish was there to support and bring out the beauty of food served. Shiro took this as his raison d’etre; his lifetime pursuit to create dishes which complimented the seasonality, texture, color and flavor. He had an impressive list of exhibitions, including a private exhibition at the Umeda Kindai Bijutsu-Ten as well as the Niponbashi Mitsukoshi, Takashimaya, and Ikebukuro Tobu, the equivalent of being displayed on New Yorks Fifth Avenue or other cities most Trendy streets, as well as many international exhibitions. Like most Iga-area artists, his output was low, but quality and originality high, making his work very much in demand.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469684 (stock #MC045)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Gold nuggets gleam on the deep lavender and black surface of this natural-formation by Inayoshi Osamu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kurinuki Kinsai Kaki. Kinsai is literally gold color, and here the artist has embedded gold into the surface, allowing it to expand and bubble out in the heat of the firing process. The effect of this on the dark matt surface is both striking and original. Kurinuki is the technique of digging a form out of a block of clay. It is 18-1/2 inches (47 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Inayoshi Osamu was born in Aichi prefecture, the heart of Mino country, in 1976. He completed his initial training in the plastic arts at the Seto Pottery School in 2002, garnering an award that same year at the 56th Seto City Art Exhibition. In 2007 he established his own kiln in Toyohashi, and was awarded at the 19th Heart of Oribe Pottery exhibition (again the following year). In 2008 he began to focus on the Atsumi pottery of the Heian and Kamakura periods, building up a unique repertoire. After several more domestic shows and prizes, he had his overseas debut in 2010, and has since received a great deal of attention both at home and abroad.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469367 (stock #MC023)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A natural ash glazed (Shizen-yu) vase by legendary artist Kumano Kurouemon enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Echizen Hanaire. It is 26 cm (10-1/2 inches) tall, 17 cm (6-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
A ceramic madman, oil painter and recluse, Kuroemon is as eccentric as his pottery predicts. Born in Fukui prefecture in 1955 Kuroemon was a painter from youth, he began his studies under Fujita Jurouemon in 1976, and moved to study also under Toda Soshiro. Invited to the Soviet Union he spent time there and in Sakhalin in the 80s, returning to Japan to build his own kiln in 1987. He was the feature of a major exhibition in Germany in 2004, but aside from a few small exhibitions held in Japan (which quickly sell out) he remains a humble artist holed up in his mountain hermitage and works by him are not easy to acquire.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1469339 (stock #MC125)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Silver glistens inside the near matt core of this fabulous chawan by JCS Gold Award winner Ito Keiji enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 12 cm (5 inches) diameter, 9.5 cm (just less than 4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ito Keiji was born in 1935, and has spent his life challenging the accepted concepts of traditional ceramics. He was awarded at the 1981 Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition. He was awarded the Gifu Prefectural Cultural Award in 2006, and again the Award for Culture and Arts in 2013, culminating in the prestigious Japan Ceramics Society (JCS) Gold Award in 2017. Work by him is held in a plethora of important institutions throughout the globe. Tokyo and Kyoto National Museums of Modern Art, Gifu Prefectural Museum and Gifu Prefectural Museum of Contemporary Ceramics, Shiga Togeinomori Museum of Ceramic Art, Paramita Museum and Aichi Prefectural Ceramic Museum among others in Japan as well as the Everson Museum, Honolulu Museum, Art Gallery of New South Wales, and Faenza among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1469333 (stock #MC126)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A masterpiece by Kato Shigetaka, this bowl is very powerful, and I am not one to wax too longingly on individual pieces. In short: he nailed it with this bowl which comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kuro Chawan. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kato Shigetaka (1927-2013) was born the son of legendary revivalist Kato Tokuro, his older brother the legendary rebel Okabe Mineo. Shigetaka graduated the Seto Industrial School of Ceramics and studied under his father. From 1959-1971 submitted annually to the Nitten where he received the Hokutosho prize as well as the Modern Ceramics Prize among others, and later governors prize at the Asahi Togeiten Ceramic Exhibition. He also was recipient of the prestigious Japanese Ceramics Society Award. He accompanied his father on frequent trips to China and Central Asia for research into the roots of silk road pottery. He was extremely talented and worked the gamut of Mino and Seto styles.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469257 (stock #MC172)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A breathtaking new look at Shigaraki Anagama ware by Furutani Taketoshi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Shizen-yu Yohen Shinogi Tsubo (Natural Ash Glazed Blade Style Shigaraki Tsubo). The artist has coil formed the vessel, with thick walls, then incised a waving pattern leaving a saw-tooth surface dusted in ash with brilliant hi-iro and dark charring. It is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Directly from the artist this summer.
Furutani Taketoshi was born the son of master craftsman Furutani Hirofumi in 1974, graduating the Shigaraki Industrial High School Ceramics department in 1992 before entering the Shiga prefectural Ceramics Research Facility studying wheel technique, graduating the following year. He then did a year apprenticeship at a pottery before re-entering for a second course at the Research Facility, graduating in 1995. From that year he returned to the family kiln, receiving the family tradition from both his grandfather Furutani Churoku and father Furutani Hirofumi. Subverting the self, he makes simple, organic pots which have a timeless quality, very much rooted in the now, but paying homage to the traditions past down through the ages. He was named a Designated Traditional Craftsman (Dento Kogeishi) in 2013. He has exhibited with the Nihon Dento Kogeiten among others, and still works closely with his father at the family kiln.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469256 (stock #MC119)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Dragonflies alight on autumn grasses and bush clover forming the perfect seasonal connotation under an engorged white moon on this pair of mouse-colored (Nezumi) vases by Shino legend Wakao Toshisada enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Nezumi Shino So-heki. Together they are 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) long, 18 cm (7 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Wakao Toshisada was born in Tajimi, Gifu prefecture, home of Mino pottery, in 1933. He was first recognized at the New Crafts exhibition of 1960, the same year he was first exhibited at the Central Japan Art Exhibition. Three years later he made his debut at the Asahi Ceramics Exhibition, following in 1965 with the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition. In 1971 he first exhibited with the Nihon Togeiten (All Japan Ceramics Exhibition) and was awarded the following year the New Mino Artists Prize, gathering acclaim as a leader in the field. After many domestic and International exhibits, he was awarded the Kato Kohei prize in 1986. and was recipient of the prestigious Japan Ceramics Society (JCS) Award in 1989. He was named an intangible cultural asset of Tajimi city in 1995, and of Gifu Prefecture in 2003, and works by the artist are held in the Museum of Modern Art Tokyo, V&A, Freer Gallery and Sackler among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469113 (stock #MC007)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A ghostly pale tsubo with jagged grooves cut into the shoulder by Kimura Morinobu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kaede-yu O-Tsubo (Large Tsubo with Maple-Ash Glaze). It is 36 cm (14 inches) diameter, 42 cm (16-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Due to size the cost of shipping will be accrued separately.
Kimura Morinobu (b. 1932) was one of three born into a pottery family in Kyotos Higashiyama pottery district. He attended the Kyoto Municipal School of Art graduating from the sculpture division, and entered the Kyoto Ceramic Research Facility, the stomping grounds of so many of the brightest talents in modern Japanese Pottery. After apprenticing under both his brother, Morikazu, and Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi, he established his own kiln in 1967. His list of exhibitions is much too long to put down here, he was named an intangible Cultural Property (Mukei Bunkazai) of Kyoto Prefecture in 1992. Works by the artist are held in the Kyoto National Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469040 (stock #MC008)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Lavender and pink tinge the thick glaze applied to this large open tsubo by Kimura Morinobu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Nasu-yu Shitomon Tsubo (Tsubo with Eggplant Glaze). This is a coloration for which Morinobu is well known and is unique to him. I remember meeting him one day at his house in Northern Kyoto and talking about this unusual glaze. He said an entire field of Nasu (eggplant) garners just a handful of this precious ash. The vessel is 29 cm diameter (just less than 12 inches) and stands 31.5 cm (12.5 inches) tall. It is in perfect condition.
Kimura Morinobu (b. 1932) was one of three born into a pottery family in Kyotos Higashiyama pottery district. He attended the Kyoto Municipal School of Art graduating from the sculpture division, and entered the Kyoto Ceramic Research Facility, the stomping grounds of so many of the brightest talents in modern Japanese Pottery. After apprenticing under both his brother, Morikazu, and Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi, he established his own kiln in 1967. His list of exhibitions is much too long to put down here, he was named an intangible Cultural Property (Mukei Bunkazai) of Kyoto Prefecture in 1992. Works by the artist are held in the Kyoto National Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1469039 (stock #MC066)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
An earing clings to the “mimi” on this fabulous ash glazed vessel by one of our favorite hidden treasures, Tamura Roppo, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Koshu Iga Mimitsuki Hanaire. The traditional form is affixed with two “ears”, from one of which clings one tremulous drip of ash, seeming to slightly weigh down that side. Happenstance occurring at just the right place at just the right time during the firing process that it survived without falling or breaking off. It is this fostering of the accidental that is so definitive of the Japanese aesthetic. It is 27 cm (10-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Tamura Roppo (b. 1960) claims his potting career began at the age of 20 when he took a lump of clay he had molded to the kiln of a nearby young potter begging for him to fire it. In 1982 he opened a kiln in Shinshu, then moved to Yamanashi in 1991. In 2001 he moved to his present location. He uses all local materials, and is well known for his Kosyu-Iga yakishime wares. Perhaps due to the hardships of his beginning, he allows young potters free use of his Anagama kiln, helping to cultivate the next generation.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1468971 (stock #MC137)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
$950.00
Sale Pending
An exquisite vessel in white with elegant stripes of soft color by hard to find Niwa Ryochi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Senmon Tsubo. There is a palpable grace to the piece which seems to reflect the Japanese appreciation of silence and shadows. It is 27.5 cm (11 inches) diameter, 33 cm (13 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Hirashimizu-yaki started when the Lord Niwa Jizaemon, invited Tojihei Ono, a potter from Ibaraki, to make pottery using clay from Chitoseyama during the Bunka era of the late Edo period. There are four kilns in operation today. During the Bunsei era (1818-1829) Abe Kakuzaemon of the Soma clan visited here, built a kiln, and spread the techniques of Soma-yaki pottery, which contributed to Hirashimizu becoming a large pottery-producing area. During the middle of the Meiji period (late 19th century) when the area was enjoying its most prosperous time, over 30 kilns were in operation. Today only 4 exist. Niwa Ryochi was born in Yamagata in 1931. In 1946 he entered apprenticeship at the Ryusen kiln, and due to circumstance, became 4th head of the kiln in 1950. He has exhibited at the Kofu-Kai, and Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts exhibition as well as at many of Japans top galleries.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1468909 (stock #MC040)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Graffito scrawls through the silver lining of this fine Chawan by Morino Taimei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A single dark spot, like a phpotograhic negative of the full moon reflected in water. Outside a wavering line about the foot. The bowl is 12.5 cm diameter, 7.5 cm tall and in perfect condition.
Taimei was born in Kyoto in 1934, and was first accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition at a relatively young age in 1957 (a year before graduating the Kyoto Municipal University of Fine Art!). In 1960 he received the prestigious Hokutosho prize at the same National Exhibition. In the early 60s he worked as a guest professor at the University of Chicago. Upon his return to Japan his career began to lift off with a second Hokutosho Prize at the Nitten, followed by The governors prize and others at the Gendai Kogei Ten (Modern National Crafts Exhibition). He was subsequently selected for display at the Kyoto and Tokyo National Museums in 1972 and was accepted into the first Nihon Togei Ten that same year. Since his list of exhibitions and prizes has continued to grow, with subsequent selections in the Tokyo and Kyoto museums of Art, as well as exhibitions in Paris, Italy, America, Canada, Denmark and others. In 2007 he received the Japan Art Academy Prize, an award to a work of art similar in weight to the bestowing of Living National Treasure to an artist. This puts the artist in a small club, rare and important. For more information on the artist see Contemporary Japanese Ceramics, Fired with Passion by (Lurie/Chan, 2006) or the recent exhibition of works titled Generosity in Clay from the Natalie Fitz-gerald Collection.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1468885 (stock #MC035)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A fabulous Shigaraki Tsubo of austere form blasted with natural ash glaze by Otani Shiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A classic work it is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Otani Shiro was born in Shigaraki in 1936 and graduated the Prefectural School in the ceramics department in 1956, which he followed up with 4 years studying decorating techniques under Morioka Yutaro. He then moved to Kyoto where he studied at the Municipal Ceramics Research Facility, where he trained under Kiyomizu Kyubei, Shofu Eichi and Uchida Kunio before returning to Shigaraki to yet further his studies in design. He garnered his first award at the Shiga Prefectural Art Exhibition in 1962, as well as the Governor’s prize at the National Rodosha Bijutsu-Ten Exhibition. He took a position with an industrial kiln in Shigaraki in 1963, and began potting in his free time, exhibiting and being awarded at the Asahi Togeiten among others. In 1968, he left his position at the kiln, and in 1969 was first accepted into the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogeiten). In 1973 he established his own kilns in Shigaraki, both an Anagama submerged kiln and a climbing kiln, and began learning from future Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi. From there he participated in the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National crafts Exhibition) as well as innumerable private exhibitions both domestic and International, and was named an Intangible Cultural Asset of Shigaraki in 1990. His work is held in The Museum of Art in Atlanta, The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Fogg Art Gallery of Harvard as well as the Morikami Museum and Smithsonian among others. For an in depth look at this potter see the article by Rob Barnard in Ceramics Monthly volume 39 (Summer 1991).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1468667 (stock #MC032)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Wow, a jaw-dropping bowl in igneous black like some volcanic expulsion by Kim Hono enclosed in the original signed wooden box. So impressed was even the artist with this piece that he has drawn an image of the bowl up the side of the box and over onto the lid. It is 11.5 x 13 x 10 cm 4-1/2 x 5 x 4 inches) and in excellent condition.
Kim Hono was born in Seto City Aichi Prefecture in 1958, and graduated the Prefectural Ceramics School in 1977, then taking up apprenticeship at a local kiln before establishing himself as an independent artist in 1982. He held his first solo exhibition in Nagoya in 1985. He has been exhibited at the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition Dento Kogeiten National Traditiaonal Crafts Exhibition, Asahi Togeiten Exhibition, Chunichi Kokusai Togeiten, and his works being shown in some of Japans top galleries including Kuroda Toen in Tokyo’s Ginza ward. Not to be defined, even by himself, famously when asked by Hohnoho Magazine to define his work he cryptically replied only: Kaze wo Kanjiru Koto (Feeling the wind).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1468650 (stock #MC033)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A beautiful half orb in shimmering silver with matte Caribbean blue by Morino Taimei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ginsai Hai. It is 6.5 cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Morino Taimei was born in Kyoto in 1934, and was first accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition at a relatively young age in 1957 (a year before graduating the Kyoto Municipal University of Fine Art!). In 1960 he received the prestigious Hokutosho prize at the same National Exhibition. In the early 60s he worked as a guest professor at the University of Chicago. Upon his return to Japan his career began to lift off with a second Hokutosho Prize at the Nitten, followed by the governor’s prize and others at the Gendai Kogei Ten (Modern National Crafts Exhibition). He was subsequently selected for display at the Kyoto and Tokyo Natby ional Museums in 1972 and was accepted into the first Nihon Togei Ten that same year. Since his list of exhibitions and prizes has continued to grow, with subsequent selections in the Tokyo and Kyoto museums of Art, as well as exhibitions in Paris, Italy, America, Canada, Denmark and others. In 2007 he received the Japan Art Academy Prize, an award to a work of art similar in weight to the bestowing of Living National Treasure to an artist. This puts the artist in a small club, rare and important. For more information on the artist see Contemporary Japanese Ceramics, Fired with Passion by (Lurie/Chan, 2006) or the recent exhibition of works titled Generosity in Clay from the Natalie Fitzgerald Collection.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1468626 (stock #MC031)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
An absolute classic natural ash glazed sake bottle by the reclusive potter Osako Mikio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tokkuri. Most of the surface is covered in ash, tremulous tears of liquefied ash weeping over the charred clay. It is 14 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Osako Mikio (1940-1995), born in Usa Oita prefecture on the Island of Kyushu, arrived at ceramics late in life, starting to study with Ezaki Issei at the Tokonmane ceramic Research Center in 1968 and staying with his teacher until he built his first kiln in 1982.. He received Grand Prize at the International Biennial of Ceramics in Vallauris, France in 1972. Known for his yakishime and ash glazed pottery, His profound understanding of wood firing, post firing and pottery in general was exceptional and his forms and surfaces are mature beyond his years of experience. A fitting quote by Dr. Frederick Baekeland from the catalogue; Modern Japanese Ceramics in American Collections, sums up the true nature of the potter and his pots; “The strong, conventional potting and rich sobriety of Osako’s ceramics appeal to modern taste and accords well with the aesthetic canons of the tea ceremony.”
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1468547 (stock #MC030)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A small bottle with ash draped from the shoulder like a traditional priest robe by Takeuchi Kimiaki enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ko-tsubo. It is 10.5 cm (4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Takeuchi Kimiaki (1948– 2011) was born in Tokoname and started learning wheel throwing when he was a middle school student. He met his mentor Ezaki Issei at the Tokoname Ceramic School when he was 16 years old. Along with Ezaki, he and Osako Mikio revitalized Tokoname ware following eh nearly lost ancient traditions using local mountain clay and ash glaze. He exhibited with and was awarded at the Asahi Togeiten, Chunichi International Ceramic Exhibition, Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition and Nihon Togeiten National Ceramic Art Exhibition among many others. He earned Grand Prize at the International Exhibition of Vallauris. While paying homage to tradition, he imbues his work with a chic contemporary ambiance. Work by him is held in the collections of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, The V&A in London, the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art among others.