Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1476113 (stock #MT001)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Two platinum spikes erupt from the black glazed surface of this Kurinuki vase hollowed out from a black of black clay by Masatomo Toi, the first Kurinuki vase he has created (we think he is on to something). It is 21 cm tall, 25 x 23 cm (10 x 9 inches including the spikes. It comes with a signed wooden placard, directly from the artist.
Masatomo Toi was born in Aichi Prefecture in 1992, and graduated the Design course at the Tajimi Ceramics Research Facility in 2019. Since he has been developing his series of “Thorny” vessels and objects. At the same time he has been studying the way of tea and other traditional arts such as flower arrangement, and his use of negative space is masterful. His works have been featured in a number of group and juried exhibitions. He will soon depart Japan for a year of study and experimentation abroad, and we expect great things in his future
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1475842 (stock #MT022)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Three gilded thorns shatter the matte white surface of this large vase by Masatomo Toi, a striking combination of ideas. It is from his Dilemma series, the only piece in matte finish. It is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Masatomo Toi was born in Aichi Prefecture in 1992, and graduated the Design course at the Tajimi Ceramics Research Facility in 2019. Since he has been developing his series of “Thorny” vessels and objects. At the same time he has been studying the way of tea and other traditional arts such as flower arrangement, and his use of negative space is masterful. His works have been featured in a number of group and juried exhibitions. He will soon depart Japan for a year of study and experimentation abroad, and we expect great things in his future.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1990 item #1475451 (stock #MC086)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Scrafitto dots surround a pool of crackled glass deeply impressed into the ovoid form of this ko-tsubo by Yagi Kazuo enclosed in a wooden box signed by his son Yagi Akira. White slip appears haphazardly slapped on the body as with a wide brush, creating a vigorous dynamic, combined with the pointilized circle and abstract form, there is a tension which draws one into the belly of the work, certainly reflecting the best this important artist had to offer. It is 16.5 x 13 x 15 cm (6-1/2 x 5 x 6 inches) and in excellent condition. For a nearly identical piece see New Forms, New Voices (2017) p. 85.
Yagi Kazuo (1918-1979) was one of the most influential Avant Garde potters of 20th century Japan. He was born into the family of potter Yagi Isso, a noted specialist in fine Chinese and traditional Japanese forms and glazes. Kazuo studied at the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility, like many great potters before him including his father and the founders of the Mingei movement, Kawai Kanjiro and Hamada Shoji. While there immersed in traditional forms, he joined the Ceramic Sculpture Association of Japan, and in 1939 was exhibited with them. Drafted shortly thereafter, he wa sent to China, but quickly returned to Japan with illness, for which he was discharged, and went back to sculpture, very much influenced by Western Art movements of the time. The war years were difficult of course, but following Japan’s Surrender, Kazuo was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition. Like many young artists who had been held in the yolk of Japan’s strict military regime, he was grasping for something new, and his work expressed a strong desire to throw off the weight of traditionalism and function. So it was in 1948 when Kazuo, along with a number of other potters including Suzuki Osamu, Yamada Hikaru and Kumakura Junkichi, founded the Iconic Sodeisha Group. The work of this group would change forever the perception of Japanese pottery, and he would go down as one of the most influential potters of the 20th century.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1475251 (stock #MC085)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An open tsubo covered in highly unusual gloss glaze with a colorful floral spray by Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 cm (9-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1475242 (stock #MC131)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A playful sculpture which challenges the viewers perception by Hayashi Yasuo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Sakuhin (work). It is 12.5 x 9 x 12.5 cm and in perfect condition. According to a description of a similar work in the collection of the Met: Hayashi’s series of black and gray coil-built trompe l’oeil “boxes,” a group that was inspired by his experience flying without lights at night as a kamikaze pilot... this work presents new ways of looking at three-dimensional forms. Hayashi trained in the Japanese style of painting prior to World War II. After the war he became fascinated by avant-garde Western artists, including Pablo Picasso, whose work influenced his early ceramics. He then developed the spare, abstract style that characterizes his mature art. The artist created this piece’s surface patterning by masking certain areas and using an atomizer of his own design to spray glaze onto the stoneware before firing.
Hayashi Yasuo was born in Kyoto in 1928, son of a potter. He began to study traditional painting in 1940, but his studies were interrupted by the Second World War. Folowing the conflict and discharge from the military, he began making pottery, helping to found the Shikokai ceramic society of avant-garde ceramicists in 1947. His artistic career is daunting, and much too long to put into this brief introduction including many awards both domestic and abroad (Italy, France, Portugal, Canada, Australia, New Zealand…). Also he has been the focus of solo exhibitions in some of the most important galleries throughout the Japanese archipelago as well as the United States, Australia and Germany. He is held in the collection of the Museum of Art & Design, New York, Everson Museum of Art, New Orleans Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Art, National Gallery of Australia, National Ceramic Museum Sevres in France, Vallauris Ceramic Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Faenza International Ceramics Museum, Museum of Decorative Art, Prague, Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Seoul Metropolitan Museum in South Korea, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, National Museum of Art, Osaka, National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art and Museum of Contemporary Ceramics in Shigaraki among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1475181 (stock #MC130)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A lovely lavender-tinged gray vase swept with brush strokes like fleeting snow in the Utsutsukawa-yaki tradition by Yoshioka Gagyu enclosed in the original singed wooden box titled Shirasagi Hanaire (White Egret Vase). Two birds stand against the cold on a long barren branch tinged with silver. Truly exquisite. The vase is 19.5 cm (just less than 8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Gagyu’s first exhibited piece at the age of 20 in 1955 took the governors prize at the Nagasaki Kenten Prefectural Art Exhibition. That was the beginning of a prestigious career prolific with awards culminating in being named an important cultural property for Nagasaki prefecture in 1975 (the state version of a living national treasure) he has also displayed with the Nihon Dento Kogeiten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition) among many others, and has an impressive number of private exhibitions. He is credited with reviving the lost art of Utsutsukawa-yaki, and is a very important figure in modern Arita.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1475068 (stock #MC087)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A beautiful bamboo shaped vessel of pale gray glaze by Takahashi Samon enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Konabiki Hanaire. It is 28 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Takahashi Samon (b. 1948) first studied with Kato Kobei V and Living National Treasure Kato Takuo. He then entered the Gifu Prefectural Ceramic Institute to study kiln making before going to the Kamakura kiln of Kitaoji Rosanjin for further study. He established his own kiln in 1977. Unaffiliated, he relies on solo and group exhibitions to show his creations. He is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1475067 (stock #MC084)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An austere bottle glazed in rich green copper by the highly acclaimed Okabe Mineo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Oribe Ichirin Sashi. It is 21 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Okabe Mineo (1919-1990) was born the first son of important artist Kato Tokuro, however the relationship with his father was volatile. When he was 9 Tokuro moved the young family to Seto, where Mineo would graduate the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics School in 1937. After a year at the family kiln, he moved to Tokyo, then joined the army in 1940. He fought against the Americans and would spend several years as a prisoner of war in the Philippines, repatriated to Japan in 1947. He returned to Aichi prefecture, leaving enough distance between himself and his estranged family, and with his wife began producing pottery in Toyoda. In 1953 he met Koyama Fujio; that same year he was awarded the Hokuto prize at the Nitten, and his work was collected by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This was the true beginning of his career. In 1955 he received the JCS award, one of the highest honors for a Japanese potter. By the mid ‘60s. he moved to celadon ware. He changed his name from Kato to Okabe in 1978, to honor his wife who supported his efforts for so many years.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1474908 (stock #MC029)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Clusters cling to the bottom of this heavily encrusted small bottle scorched black and off kilter which must have become lost in the embers by Osako Mikio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ko-tsubo. It is roughly 8 cm (3-1\4 inches) diameter, 9.5 cm (4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Osako Mikio (1940-1995), born in Usa Oita prefecture on the Island of Kyushu, arrived at ceramics late in life, starting to study with Ezaki Issei at the Tokonmane ceramic Research Center in 1968 and staying with his teacher until he built his first kiln in 1982.. He received Grand Prize at the International Biennial of Ceramics in Vallauris, France in 1972. Known for his yakishime and ash glazed pottery, His profound understanding of wood firing, post firing and pottery in general was exceptional and his forms and surfaces are mature beyond his years of experience. A fitting quote by Dr. Frederick Baekeland from the catalogue; Modern Japanese Ceramics in American Collections, sums up the true nature of the potter and his pots; “The strong, conventional potting and rich sobriety of Osako’s ceramics appeal to modern taste and accords well with the aesthetic canons of the tea ceremony.”
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1474713
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular faceted deep chawan in dual-color by Nishihata Daibi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tamba Kakewake Chawan. It is 9.5 cm (just under 4 inchers) tall, 11-12 cm (4-1/2 to 5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Nishihata Daibi (also sometimes written NIshibata) was born in Tachikui Village, Hyogu in 1976. After graduating the Law Department of Kyoto University, one of the countries most formidable schools, in 1999, the promising young lawyer moved to complete a ceramics course at the prefectural vocational school, and then a stint at the Municipal Industrial Research Institute (Like many of the greats before him, Kawai Kanjiro, Hamada Shoji etc). His first solo exhibition was held at Kuroda Toen in Ginza, quite a feat for a young artist. In 2005 he first exhibited with the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition. The following year, in addition to that venue, he was exhibited at the Chanoyu Zokei Ten a (Modern Forms in Tea). While his works were popular in private Department store exhibits, he continued with these two jurried fairs, but tragically died of heart failure at the very young age of 34 in 2010. The number of works by this artist are very few and difficult to find. He is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1474426
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A bowl deeply impressed with Jomon rope designs by Living National Treasure Shimaoka Tasuzo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 7.5 (3 inches) tall, 13.5 cm (5-1/4 inches) diameter.
Shimaoka Tatsuzo (1919-2007) was born in Tokyo and enrolled in the Tokyo Kogei Daigaku Ceramics division in 1939. The following year he would meet Mashiko Mingei potter Hamada Shoji, and the course of his life was thought set, graduating in 1941. However he was drafted in 1942, and sent to Burma where he would remain until repatriation after the cessation of hostilities. In 1946 Tatsuzo apprenticed under Hamada who encouraged him to find his own voice, which he did when in 1950 took part in research into ancient Jomon potteries with Shirasaki Shunji, which would have a profound influence on his style. Working with Jomon rope patterns, Tatsuzo set out to create a style unique to himself, establishing his own kiln in 1954. Widely exhibited, awarded and influential in his lifetime, he received the Japan Ceramic Society Gold award in 1994, one of the highest honors for a Japanese ceramic artist, and was designated a Living National Treasure (Juyo Mukei Bunkazai or Ningenkokuho) in 1996 culminating with receiving the Order of the Rising Sun in 1999.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1474349 (stock #MC238)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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This raw form covered in scorched white has been slabbed off in the Shinogi style by Atarashi Manabu. The word Shinogi denotes the curve on a samurai Sword blade, and has come to be used in pottery to describe things which have been scored or sculpted with a knife. The sake vessel is 15.5 cm (6 inches) tall and in excellent condition and comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shino Shinogi Tokkuri.
Atarashi Manabu has been growing in popularity as one of the leaders in the Iga pottery tradition since the first time I saw his work nearly 20 years ago when visiting the family showroom in Iga village. Born in 1973 in Osaka son of the second generation artist and one of the leading revivalists of the Iga tradition in post war Japan, Atarashi Kanji. He graduated the literature department of Kansai University in 1995, moving to apprentice under his father a few years later. In 2002 he built his first anagama Kiln, and held his first of a multitude of solo exhibitions. Intensely fired multiple times to achieve the bidoro glass puddles and landscape effects which define his aesthetic, the geometric works add a contemporary sensibility to the traditional Iga style and transcend the realm of utilitarian crafts breaking into the sculptural domain. His work has proven innovative and challenging to the norm, taking his fathers tradition into the 21st century.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1474348 (stock #MC232)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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What a joy to hold this igneous Guinomi by Atarashi Manabu, the stone like texture and form are a pleasure to the palm. It is covered in thick ash outside, pooling into crystalline shades on the surface outside, while the inside is largely left untouched, offering a view of the clay and a stark contrast between the inner and outer surfaces to enjoy visually. It comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Iga Shinogi Guinomi. The vessel fits perfectly in the palm, roughly 7.5 cm (3 inches) diameter and is in perfect condition, directly from the artist.
Atarashi Manabu has been growing in popularity as one of the leaders in the Iga pottery tradition since the first time I saw his work nearly 20 years ago when visiting the family showroom in Iga village. Born in 1973 in Osaka son of the second generation artist and one of the leading revivalists of the Iga tradition in post war Japan, Atarashi Kanji. He graduated the literature department of Kansai University in 1995, moving to apprentice under his father a few years later. In 2002 he built his first anagama Kiln, and held his first of a multitude of solo exhibitions. Intensely fired multiple times to achieve the bidoro glass puddles and landscape effects which define his aesthetic, the geometric works add a contemporary sensibility to the traditional Iga style and transcend the realm of utilitarian crafts breaking into the sculptural domain. His work has proven innovative and challenging to the norm, taking his fathers tradition into the 21st century.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1473155 (stock #MC220)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A joyful yellow light seems to shine like a jewel from within the fissures of this cool tea bowl by Kitagawa Kazuki enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kasane iro-me Chawan. It is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter, 8 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition from the artist this autumn. This artist works by creating the body with subsequent applications of variously colored liquid clay, then scoring away the surface to create patterns by revealing the various layers.
Kitagawa Kazuki was born in Kyoto in 1991, and graduated Seika University Design department in 2014 before entering the Tajimi City Ceramics Research Facility, graduating there in 2016. He currently lives and works in Tajimi.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1472980 (stock #MC218)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Widely fissured pale green glaze covers the elegant form of this fresh water jar for use in the Japanese Tea Ceremony by Uraguchi Masauyuki enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Seiji Mizusashi. It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) tall, 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. It comes complete with the original black lacquered wooden lid.
Uraguchi Masayuki (b. 1964) discovered pottery while attending the Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music and his world turned when he was introduced to a Song Dynasty Seiji Vase" at the Tokyo National Museum designated a National Treasure during one of his art courses. After graduation he met (and studied under) living National Treasure for celadon Miura Koheiji at the Tokyo University of Art. Inspired by the Southern Song celadons as well as the work of Japanese master ceramists Itaya Hazan and Okabe Mineo, Uraguchi spent years personally researching his own celadon glazes and clay bodies types. He finished his post graduate program in 1989, claiming a prize that same year at the National Traditional Arts and Crafts New Works Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Shinsakuten). The following year he would b awarded at the Nitten National Exhibition. In 1991 he established his kiln in Tochigi prefecture. He has since received innumerable awards, including the Asahi Ceramic Art Exhibition, Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition (Nihon Togeiten) among many others. In 1995 he travelled to China to study first-hand the Song guan and Longquan ceramics. In 2001 he moved his Kiln to Hachigocho, Ibaraki Prefecture
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1472979 (stock #MC217)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite chawan tea bowl by Uraguchi Masayuki enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji Hyosai Chawan (Shattered Ice Celadon Tea Bowl). It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 8.5 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and in perfect condition.
Uraguchi Masayuki (b. 1964) discovered pottery while attending the Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music and his world turned when he was introduced to a Song Dynasty Seiji Vase" at the Tokyo National Museum designated a National Treasure during one of his art courses. After graduation he met (and studied under) living National Treasure for celadon Miura Koheiji at the Tokyo University of Art. Inspired by the Southern Song celadons as well as the work of Japanese master ceramists Itaya Hazan and Okabe Mineo, Uraguchi spent years personally researching his own celadon glazes and clay bodies types. He finished his post graduate program in 1989, claiming a prize that same year at the National Traditional Arts and Crafts New Works Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Shinsakuten). The following year he would b awarded at the Nitten National Exhibition. In 1991 he established his kiln in Tochigi prefecture. He has since received innumerable awards, including the Asahi Ceramic Art Exhibition, Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition (Nihon Togeiten) among many others. In 1995 he travelled to China to study first-hand the Song guan and Longquan ceramics. In 2001 he moved his Kiln to Hachigocho, Ibaraki Prefecture
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1472708 (stock #MC211)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Brilliant firing affects decorate this deep tapering cup of raw clay by Tsuji Seimei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A classic work relying truly on Tsuchi-no-aji, or the taste of the clay. There is no attempt at overt decoration of sculpture, just a perfectly formed cup with a slightly wider base blasted in the furnace with black charring, thin rivulets of molten ash and lots of Hi-iro. It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Tsuji Seimei (1927-2008) was born the son of an antique dealer in Tokyo in 1927. He was a childhood prodigy, and had acquired a reputation before leaving school, allowing him to meet many of the great artists of his day. In 1941 he established a studio with his sister. In 1955 he built his own studio in Tama City, choosing Shigaraki as his medium, he fired prodigiously. He married Tsuji Kyo, also a potter, and together they formed a team which helped define the blending of post-war traditional and non-functional ceramics.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1472523 (stock #MC327)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An incredible universe is born in the center of this masterpiece by Tenmoku legend Kimura Moriyasu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Tenmoku Chawan. It is 14 cm (5-3/4 inches) diameter, 7 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Born into the Kimura family in Kyoto in 1935 the youngest of four children, it was only natural for Moriyasu to move into ceramics, following and training under his brother Morikazu and learning decorating techniques from his father. It was in 1959 (at the age of 24) when Moriyasu gained National attention as he was selected as one of the participants at the Modern Ceramics of Japan exhibition at the National Museum of Art. Into the 60s he began exhibition with the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition. It was when viewing a National Treasure Tsubo in the Atake collection that he was moved to express himself solely through the perfection of Tenmoku oil spot glazes. He is held in several important public collections, including the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas and Houston Museums, Peabody Essex Museum, National Palace Museum Taiwan, as well as the collection of Ise Shrine.