Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1414621 (stock #1414)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Ethnic designs in brilliant crimson red decorate this ewer by Yoshikawa Mitsuru enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Aka-e no Binshi (Red Decorated Server). It is 15 x 12 x 15 cm (6 x 4-3/4 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition. Together with the sake cups and sake pot, this would be a wonderful service set for two. Anyone wishing to purchase this group will receive a proper discount.
Yoshikawa Mitsuru was born in Kyoto in 1949, graduating the Kyoto Municipal University of Arts advanced studies in ceramics in 1976. He has been exhibited at the Asahi Craft Exhibition, Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition, Asahi Togeiten Ceramics Exhibition and his works have been collected by Kyoto City. He has been picked up by many of Japan’s preeminent galleries, including private exhibitions at the prestigious Takashimaya and Kuroda Toen of Tokyo’s Ginza District.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1414577 (stock #1412)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A black pipe reminiscent of both an ancient Japanese court cap and a industrial burner chimney by Shibata Shigeru dating circa 1978 enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kuro-yu Kaki, Okoru (Black Glazed Vase Titled Rise-up or Occurrence). This piece strongly shows the convention of the second generation Sodeisha members interest in form over decoration. It is quite large at 15 inches (38 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Shibata Shigeru was born in Tokyo in 1950, graduating the Kyoto Municipal University of Art in 1973, upon which time he moved to his present location. In 1975 he became a member of the avant-garde Sodeisha group which stressed form over function. He held his first solo exhibition in 1980, and was selected for exhibition at the 6th Nihon Togeiten National Ceramic Exhibition in 1981. From there he has concentrated on the more intimate confines of private galleries. For more see Sodeisha Avant Garde Japanese Ceramics, (1979) or Toh vol. 58.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1414544 (stock #1411)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A stack of fused Bowls hollowed out as a vase by Satonaka Hideto enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Utsuwa dating circa 1976. During the post war era a great amount of research was done in reviving ancient firing techniques, many potters and scholars working on medieval kiln excavations would unearth stacks of bowls and mounds of fused pots where kilns had collapsed during firing dating from the Heian period on to the age of the climbing kiln. These were well known to ceramic artists and researchers at the time. Here Hideto brings one such deformation into the modern world, perhaps a commentary on the fragility of our human efforts. Ordinarily fused and covered in encrustation of ash, here the artist has taken the opposite effect, with a brilliant crackled yellow glaze. It is 7-1/2 inches (19 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Satonaka Hideto (1932-1989) was born in Nagoya and graduated advanced studies at the prestigious Tokyo Kyoiku University Arts Department in 1956, then went on to study under Miyanohara Ken, exhibiting his first ceramic sculpture with the Totokai in 1961, and garnering the Itaya Hazan Prize for it. Throughout the ‘60s he would exhibit there earning several awards as well as at the Sankikai. From 1970 he moved to the circle of Yagi Kazuo, and would fall under the umbrella of Sodeisha. Two of his works would be selected and awarded for the first Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition in 1971. The following year he would be awarded at the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition. He would leave Sodeisha after the death of his mentor in 1979. He would participate in the Valauris International Ceramic Biennale among many other overseas extravaganzas. While working as a professor at the Bunkyo University Art Department his life ended suddenly in an automobile accident in 1989. Six works by him are held in both the National Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo and Kyoto
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1414487 (stock #1410)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A life-size feminine image of a toilet slipper by Satonaka Hideto in light colored clay covered with Irabo glaze enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Sakuhin and dating circa 1975. It is just over 9 inches (23.5 cm) long and in excellent condition. From the 1950s to the 1970s there was a deep interest in an earthy convention by young ceramic artists called Tsuchi no Aji (Taste of the earth), and this Irabo glaze may have been one of the most popular extensions of that aesthetic. Tsuchi no Aji is defined as "the beautiful complexion of bare fired earth" in the manner of several types of ancient Japanese pottery traditions and practiced anew by contemporary Japanese potters in the postwar period who admired it as a "natural feeling for the oneness of clay and kiln." Experiments with earth flavor in the sculptural ceramics of the Sōdeisha group ranged from forms suggesting live organisms to clay works that protested the industrial pollution of the earth.
Satonaka Hideto (1932-1989) was born in Nagoya and graduated advanced studies at the prestigious Tokyo Kyoiku University Arts Department in 1956, then went on to study under Miyanohara Ken, exhibiting his first ceramic sculpture with the Totokai in 1961, and garnering the Itaya Hazan Prize for it. Throughout the ‘60s he would exhibit there earning several awards as well as at the Sankikai. From 1970 he moved to the circle of Yagi Kazuo, and would fall under the umbrella of Sodeisha. Two of his works would be selected and awarded for the first Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition in 1971. The following year he would be awarded at the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition. He would leave Sodeisha after the death of his mentor in 1979. He would participate in the Valauris International Ceramic Biennale among many other overseas extravaganzas. While working as a professor at the Bunkyo University Art Department hi life ended suddenly in an automobile accident in 1989. Six works by him are held in both the National Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo and Kyoto
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Pre 2000 item #1414455 (stock #1409)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A sculpture in black glaze by Yoshitake Hiroshi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Sakuhin B and dating circa 1980. Very much in the vein of this important avant-garde organization, it has a great deal of presence compacted into a small space. A nearly identical work is published in the book: Sodeisha, 35th Anniversary (Sodeisha, Sanjugoshunen Kinenhan, 1983) which is titled Suikan (Inebriated). Interestingly, Suikan is also a homonym for water pipes. The sculpture is roughly 10-1/2 x 7-1/2 x 2-1/2 inches (19 x 27 x 6 cm) and is in excellent condition.
Yoshitake Hiroshi (Hiromu, 1938-2010) was born in Kyoto in 1938, entering the Kyoto Yoshigaoka School Ceramics Department in 1953. A member of Sodeisha, he currently resides in Nagano Prefecture. student. Along with Kawakami Rikizo and Kusano Fumihiko he helped to form the group Magma in 1958, centered on Outdoor sculpture and non functional forms. He began studying under Yagi Kazuo in 1964, becoming a member of Sodeisha in 1968. His works were selected for International Exhibition by that group (see Sodeisha Avant Garde Japanese Ceramics, 1979 plate 55). He moved to Nagano prefecture in 1990.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1414152 (stock #1406)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Dark glaze covers this beautifully crafted Koro from Kawai Kanjiro dating circa 1936 enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 11.5 x 9 x 8.5 cm (4-1/2 x 3-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches) excluding the lid and is in excellent condition. The lid is of exotic hardwood with an agate finial, and is a later addition (Kanjiro did not make lids for his koro). For similar examples see the Katsukawa collection published in the biblical tome by the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1414119 (stock #1405)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Fresh out of the oven, here is a delicious treat to start the new year right, a crusty dancing form by Murakoshi Takuma enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Mimitsuki Hana-ire. Not only does the vase itself feel alive with movement, but the encrustations of ash and glossy molten ash glaze seem to be still in formation, as if it is still settling in the kiln. It is 26 cm (10 inches) tall and in perfect condition.
Murakoshi Takuma is one of those enigmas who simply lives to work with clay. He does not seek to make a living through pottery, but through his primal approach has earned a following which keeps his work in high demand. He was born in Aichi prefecture in 1954 and began his stroll down the pottery path in 1980 under the tutelage of Kyoto potter Umehara Takehira. Favoring very rough Shigaraki glaze, he established his own kiln in 1997 in the Kiyomizu pottery district of Kyoto, then moved to Nagaoka in 2002. Although eschewing the world of competitive exhibitions, he has been picked up by many of Japan’s preeminent galleries, including private exhibitions at the prestigious Kuroda Toen of Tokyo’s Ginza District.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1414078 (stock #1404)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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the silhouette of birds flit through the branches of the forest which rises up in white trunks on the verdant green of this flower receptacle by Yamaguchi Yoshihiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kasai Ju-in Mon Hanaike. The pebble textured surface is very unusual for Kutani ware, and bridges the glitzy world of porcelain and the more matte world of ceramics. The soft palette allows the vase to work in any decor, the abstract lines seeming to grow up randomly, without intent, and yet the overall design is quite striking. This is 31 cm (12 inches) diameter, 20 cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamaguchi Yoshihiro (b. 1951) studied under Asakura Isokichi and graduated from the Kutani Crafts School in 1971. He has exhibited with the Nitten, The Issuikai Ten, The Nihon Gendai Kogeiten National Modern Crafts Exhibition (awarded), The Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition as well as the National Modern Arts Exhibition (awarded) and was designated a Dento Kogeishi (Traditional Craftsman) in 1993.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1412517 (stock #1396)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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This burnished finish is one of the signature effects of Living National Treasure Yamamoto Toshu seen on this fluted gourd enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen-yaki Hyotan Hanaike. Here the blue-gray clay is covered in charred red mottles, like the natural patterns on a dried gourd, the smooth sangiri surface intentionally marred with occasional rough patches. A masterpiece and true evidence of the mastery of Toshu, one of the greatest artists to revive the tradition after the devastation and neglect of the industrial revolution in Japan. It is just less than 9 inches (22.5 cm) tall and in excellent condition. For more on this important artist sea the recent exhibition: The Bizen, at the Miho Museum in Shiga prefecture, in which a number of this artists’ works were featured.
Yamamoto Toshu (1906-1994) began working in a pottery at the age of 15. 12 years later (1933) he went independent, but interestingly decided to train again later not under a Bizen master, but Kusube Yaichi, perhaps stimulating his unusual eye for Bizen. After much acclaim, it was in 1959 that he made his worldwide appearance, with a gold prize at the Brussels World Exposition, and was named an important cultural property of Okayama that same year. He was most in love with the wheel, and his forms are crisp and sharp. He was named a living national Treasure in 1987. Works by the artist are held in the National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo and National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto as well as the Victoria Albert Museum among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1411358 (stock #1386)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Reminiscent of an excavated Haniwa figure of a house, this museum quality vase is by Koinuma Michio and comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled very simply Tsubo. It is an iconic work by this eclectic artist, whose work is entirely unique and easily discernible. It is 27.5 cm (11 inches) square, 37 cm (14-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Due to size this will require special shipping consideration.
Koinuma Michio is a compelling figure unique among contemporary artists. He seems to have no limit to his imagination and creativity, still dazzling us with new concepts after four decades. Born in the hectic war years in 1936, he is incredibly intelligent, graduating the economics department of Osaka University, then on to Waseda, one of the top three schools in Japan, for graduate studies in economics and politics. Relinquishing that life he opened a kiln in Mashiko in 1970. Since 1978 he has been consistently displayed at the best galleries in Japan, as well as overseas. For more see Contemporary Japanese Ceramics Fired with Passion (ISBN -10: 1-891640-38-0) or To volume 10, which is dedicated entirely to him.
The image is based on Haniwa funerary objects. The Haniwa are terracotta clay figures of people, animals, and houses which were deposited at Japanese tombs during the Kofun period (3rd to 6th century) in Japan. Haniwa were created according to the wazumi technique, in which mounds of coiled clay were built up to shape the figure, layer by layer. Michio follows that style, then through a process of multiple firing and various techniques degrades the surface to create the feeling of antiquity. A strikingly similar image is published, figure 18, in the anthology Toh, volume 10. According to the encyclopedia of Ancient History many Haniwa are particularly detailed in their execution and thus provide a valuable insight into the culture of the period. Standing over one metre in height, the mysterious figures are a striking example of early Japanese sculpture.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 2000 item #1411171 (stock #1384)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A slightly more austere work completing this tea set by Kanzaki Shiho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Chawan and named inside the lid Amidha-Do (Hall of Amitabha). Here the artist has refrained from over-decoration, allowing the natural color and texture of the terracotta clay to dominate. It is 5-1/4 inches (13.3 cm) diameter, 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) tall and in excellent condition, dating circa 1990.
Kanzaki Shiho (1942-2018) preferred firing his kiln for ten days, resulting in the rich textures and heavy ash deposits apparent on his work. He was born in Shigaraki, and was fast tracked into the Kansai University Law Department, but rather the life of a lawyer, after graduation he went with his heart to take up the precarious life of a potter, apprenticing under Mino artist Matsuyama Suketoshi. Later he returned to Shigaraki working there at the research center while developing his own style and methods with the Anagama. He consistently stayed with the personal world of private exhibitions, developing a large following both at home and abroad and his list of exhibitions is impressive. He has been the subject of several documentaries and Television interviews, and is widely published. For more information see, The Fire Artist, a documentary by Canadian Director Claude Gagnon. He unfortunately passed away last year and these may be the last pieces we have by him.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1410845 (stock #1381)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A beautiful combination of grays and lavenders covers the natural sculpted form in sunset color Hagi clay by legendary artisan Kaneta Masanao enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hagi Kurinuki Hanaire dating circa 2000. It is 30 x 24 x 23 cm (12 x 10 x 9 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kaneta Masanao likely needs no introduction, certainly one of Hagi is most well known names, he has been displayed both nationally and internationally innumerable times. His pieces are in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, Yamaguchi Prefectural Museum and Museum of Modern Art Brooklyn. He has been displayed at the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten and Nihon Togei Ten among many many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1410803 (stock #1380)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A breathtaking work in perfect green porcelain glaze by Shimada Fumio enclosed in the original sined wooden box titled Seihakuji Budo-cho mon Tsubo (Celadon Tsubo Carved with Grape Designs). It was exhibited at the Shimada Fumio Sakuto 40 Shunen ten and Gendai Kogei Fujino Ten (2014). The vase is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter, the same height, and is in excellent condition.
Shimada Fumio is undoubtedly one of the greatest artists working in porcelain in Japan today. He was born in Tochigi prefecture in 1948, and his work was accepted into the 21st Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition the year before he graduated the Tokyo University of Arts Advanced Studies in 1975. That year his graduation project was purchased by the University Museum, and he was awarded at the 15th Dento Kogei Shinsaku Ten (New Traditional Crafts Exhibition). In 1983 his work was part of an exhibition at the Smithsonian and V&A. From 1985 e took a position at his alma matter. Among a plethora of awards and recognitions his work has been exhibited at the aforementioned plus the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition, among others , and has been seen overseas in the China-Japan-Korea International Ceramics Exhibition, Turkey, Germany, America and Mexico.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1410798 (stock #1379)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Everything you could want in firing effects decorate the various sides of this Iga Tsubo by Tanimoto Yo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 23.5 cm (9 inches) diameter, 26.5 cm (10-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Born in 1958 the son of Iga potter Tanimoto Kosei, Yo was raised among the kilns and has always had his hands in clay. He first began exhibiting in 1982, and in 1984 moved to Europe where he studied oil painting and sculpture (in Spain), and set up a pottery studio outside Paris. After returning to Japan he set uphis own studio in 1988, working both in Japan and and Spain. Since his works have been exhibited widely, both domestically and abroad in New York, London, Barcelona and Paris.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Pre 1960 item #1410650 (stock #1377)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An iconic square bottle by one of the most important Japanese artists, Kawai Kanjiro, enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The fawn spotted white glaze is decorated with Gosu floral patterns in blue and red with a rich iron red at the mouth, the raw clay revealed at the base. It is 12 x 12 x 18 cm tall (roughly 5 x 5 x 7 inches) and in excellent condition dating likely from the height of his career, 1940s-50s.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1980 item #1410508 (stock #1375)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A signature work decorated with finger twirls of poured glaze over the pale-colored sides of this bottle form by Hamada Shoji enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Monda Kakubin dating from the 1960s. It is 4 inches (10 cm) square, 9-1/2 inches (24 cm) tall and in excellent condition. What appear in the photographs to be at first glance three chips in the edge are in fact crawling in the glaze, see the last close-up for details.
Hamada Shoji (1894-1978) was born in Tokyo, and enrolled in the Tokyo Technical University at the age of 19. In 1918 he met the important British potter Bernard Leach, and the history of ceramic arts was forever changed. One of the most influential and sought after of all Japanese Ceramic artists. There is no shortage of reading material for those who would like to learn more about this potter.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1410101 (stock #1368)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A vase with a carved-comb surface of white clay by Sakiyama Takayuki enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled dating circa 1998. It is 9 x 7 x 15 cm (3-1/2 x 3 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Sakiyama Takayuki (b. 1958) graduated the Osaka Art University in 1981. In 1984 he exhibited for the first time at the Nitten National Exhibition. He established his kiln in Shizuoka in 1987, and was accepted into and prized at the National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togeiten) for the first time in 1991 as well as being prized at the Nihon Gendai Kogeiten (modern crafts exhibition). In 2005 he received Grand Prize at the Nihon Togeiten. Work by the artist is held in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum New York, Brooklyn Museum, Minneapolis, Boston, Philadelphia, New Orleans, LACMA, Musée national de Céramique- Sèvres, France, National Museum of Scotland as well as the Museum of Ceramic Art in Hyogo and the Sano Museum among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1410012 (stock #1365)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Delicious kiln effects are displayed across the surface of this triangular slab by Sugimoto Sadamitsu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The three sides measure 33 x 36 x 41 cm (13 x 14 x 16 inches) and it is in excellent original condition.
Sugimoto Sadamitsu was born in Tokyo in 1935. A strong adherent to the Zen tradition, Sadamitsu established his own kiln at 33, receiving the kiln name from his mentor Daitokuji priest Tachibana Oki. His Zen studies have refined the spiritual side of his work, and all of his wood fired ceramics have a quiet and confident power. He has spent his life in the research of kohiki, Shigaraki Iga and Raku wares, and is more than well known in tea circles for the discriminating soul of his works. For more information on this artist see the book Fired with passion : contemporary Japanese ceramics ISBN 1-891640-38-0.