Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary

By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
In accordance with the request of local authorities our gallery in Kyoto will be closed from April 1st until further notice.
Nagae Shigekazu Contemporary Vase, Shikakkei no Katachi

Nagae Shigekazu Contemporary Vase, Shikakkei no Katachi


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Directory: Artists: Ceramics: Pottery: Vases: Contemporary: Item # 1448696

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Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A striking work covered in granulated geometric patterns by Nagae Shigekazu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shikakkei no Katachi (Quadrilateral Form). The form is elastic, warped as if it is stretching after a deep sleep. This contrasts with the concise lines of the decorating pattern, creating an interesting dialog between man’s strive for perfection and order verses the freedom of the natural world. As they say, there are no straight lines in nature. The vessel is 35 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall, 33 x 17 cm (13 x 6-1/2 inches) across the base and in excellent condition.
Nagae Shigekazu (b. 1953) graduated the Seto Industrial School of Ceramics in 1974 Beginning to grab attention in the late 70s, he has striven to perfect porcelain casting techniques, creating one-off shapes and forms previously impossible. He is held in the collection of the V&A (London), LACMA (Los Angeles) and the National Gallery of Australia, Cincinnati and Cleveland Art Museums, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Japan Foundation and many many others. With very low output, this is a rare opportunity to join the worlds top museum collections by acquiring this artist. According to Ceramics Now Magazine: Nagae Shigekazu (born in 1953), is one of the leading pioneers of porcelain casting and firing techniques in Japan. Casting is commonly associated with the mass production of porcelain, yet Nagae valiantly transcends this stereotype, ultimately elevating this technique to the avant-garde. Casting alone cannot achieve the natural movements found within Nagae’s forms. His popularity and recognition as an artist have skyrocketed, with acquisitions by the V&A in London, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the National Gallery of Australia in just the past 3 years. Also collected by leading institutions such as the Musée National de Ceramique-Sèvres in Paris and the Musée Ariana in Geneva, among others, as well as receiving prestigious awards such as the Grand Prixs at the 1998 Triennale de la Porcelain in Nyon, the Mino Ceramic Festival and the Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition (both 1997), Nagae’s stature and respect in the world of porcelain has reached new heights.