Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary

By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
In accordance with the request of local authorities our gallery in Kyoto will be closed from April 1st until further notice.
Tanaka Eiko Hand Turned and Lacquered Wooden Bowl

Tanaka Eiko Hand Turned and Lacquered Wooden Bowl


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Directory: Artists: Lacquer: Contemporary: Item # 1424016

Please refer to our stock # 1495 when inquiring.
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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 $395.00 
A sumptuous wood grain bowl by Tanaka Eiko covered outside in red and black lacquer, the lacquer thin enough to allow highlights of the tiger-striped grain to show through. Her tree of choice is the Horse Chestnut (Jap. Tocchi), which has unparalleled grain patterns. A perfectly fitted black lacquered lid with elegant finial covers the bowl. It is 10 cm (4 inches) diameter, signed on the base and comes in her red paper box with shiori card.
Tanaka Eiko was born in Aichi Prefecture in 1983, and graduated the Aichi Prefectural University of Education lacquer department in 2005. The following year her work was first presented at the Takaoka Craft Competition, the following year entered into the salon of Nakashima Torao, and had her work presented at the Ishikawa Dento Kogeiten Traditional Crafts Exhibition. She graduated the Ishikawa Prefectural Wood turning technology training center in 2010, establishing her own studio in 2012. Since her work has been exhibited around Japan, New York, Indonesia, Taiwan, Germany, Holland, Singapore and Thailand. She says: “The Japanese horse chestnut is a tree with great individuality. To bring out the personality of each tree I must confront it sincerely and draw out its strength by using red and black, the colors I love”. Exquisitely painted lacquer has brought new life to the chestnut wood. The attractiveness of curves by skillful wood turning also extends over the wood,