Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1490484 (stock #MC539)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fabulous ceramic casket by Kawai Kanjiro covered in his famous Gosu blue with abstract colorful patterns enclosed in a wooden box signed by the head of the Kawai Kanjiro Kinenkan Museum. It is 25 x 14 x 14 cm (10 x 5-1/2 x 5-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1490474 (stock #MC541)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
$3,600.00
Sale Pending
A lovely bowl covered with abstract flower designs by Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hanawan. It is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter, 11.5 cm tall and in excellent condition. Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1980 item #1482763
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An elegant celadon receptacle with custom made black lacquered lid by important female potter Suwa Sozan II titled Seiji Mizusashi and enclosed in a wooden box annotated by the third generation head of the family. The Taru shape (a traditional bound shallow wood bucket) is surmounted at the rim with lily pads upon which rests a tiny frog. In the center of the base is her circular stamp. It is 24 cm (9-1/2 inches) diameter, 12 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan Torako (Suwa Sozan II 1890–1977) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1475251 (stock #MC085)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
An open tsubo covered in highly unusual gloss glaze with a colorful floral spray by Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 cm (9-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1451547 (stock #1803)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
Five unique plates by Tomimoto Kenkichi, from various eras depicting bucolic scenery each uniquely signed on the back. Kenkichi changed his signature regularly, which makes it very easy to date his works. These date from the 1950s. Each is between 18.5 and 19.5 cm diameter (roughly 7-1/2 inches). One has a slight firing flaw near at the rim, otherwise they are all in excellent condition. A smaller 6th plate will be included, bonus.
Tomimoto Kenkichi (1886-1963) is one of Japan's finest and most important ceramic artists ever, voted the number one most influential potter of the 20th century by Honoho Magazine. He was born into a privileged family in Nara, and would spend part of his youth in England studying design and manufacturing techniques. In 1950, Tomimoto became the first professor to the Ceramic Section of the Department of Crafts, Kyoto City University of Arts. He was also involved in a number of art associations and art universities throughout his life and trained many influential ceramic artists of modern Japan. He would be appointed member of the Japan Imperial Art Academy, as well as designated an intangible cultural asset (Mukei Bunkazai or Living National Treasure), and awarded the Order of Cultural Merit. For an excellent read see the recent article by John Wright in Arts of Asia.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1445000 (stock #1728)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Horses dash past in a fervent black mass both carved into and built up onto the paddled surface of this large vessel ballooning open from a narrow base by Nakazato Tarouemon XIII enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Inside the box is written Tataki Tsubo (Paddled Vessel), Kurabe Uma (Horse Race), exhibited Autumn 1958 at the Tokyo Mitsukoshi Sports Theme Art Exhibition; Ochawangama, Nakazato Tadao (given name of Nakazato Tarouemon XIII) followed by the artists seal. An excellent example of the mid-century aesthetic. The vessel is 34.5 cm (13-1/2 inches) diameter, 30 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It has a copper insert for water (so you do not have to fill the whole Tsubo with water if displaying flowers). Due to size the cost of shipping will be accrued separately.
Nakazato Tadao (1923-2009) was born the first son of the 12th generation of Nakazato Tarouemon in Karatsu City. He graduated from the Craft Design Course, Tokyo School of Crafts (mod. Chiba University). In 1943, and first exhibited with the Nitten in 1951. In 1956 he would receive the Hokutosho prize there, followed by another commendation in 1958, and the JCS award in 1961. He took over the family name upon his fathers retirement in 1969. He would go on to receive many awards throughout his career, including the Prime Minister's Award in 1981, and the Japan Art Academy Award in 1984, The Saga Prefectural Order of Cultural Merit in 1985, and the Order of Cultural Merit by Karatsu city in 1995. In 2002 he retired from the world, entering a Buddhist temple and taking the name Hoan. He would ultimately be awarded the Order of the Rising Sun for his lifes work and be appointed an adviser of the Japan Art Academy. He was succeeded by his son,
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1441428 (stock #1678)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An iconic Bizen sake set by legendary artist and Living National Treasure Kaneshige Toyo enclosed in the original signed wooden box dating from the pre-war era titled Inbe yaki Tokuri. The bottle is delicately rendered and features the play of colors and textures for which he would be known, with a dark gray rim, while the cup is thinly made in a warm orange tinge. Both bear his fundo stamp on the bottom. The bottle is 11 cm (roughy 4-1/2 inches) tall and both are in perfect condition, with an upper and lower compartment in the box for storage.
Kaneshige Toyo (1896-1967) is one of the leaders of the group of artisans who sought to revive the tradition as it was flagging to extinction in the pre-war years and considered one of the most important figures in 20th century Bizen. It is Toyo who has been credited with having rediscovered the techniques of the Azuchi Momoyama period. Born in Bizen, Okayama prefecture, into the potting family of artisan Kaneshige Baiyo, Toyo began working with clay in 1910. By the 1930’s, he was thoroughly ensconced in the research of ancient techniques. Over the next 20 years, he was to become a leading figure in Japanese pottery, and lifelong friend of Kawakita Handeishi, Kitaoji Rosanjin and Miwa Kyuwa. Post-war, in an effort to elevate Japanese pottery, he, along with Arakawa Toyozo and Kato Tokuro, helped to establish the Nihon Kogei kai (Japan Art Crafts Association). He was designated Living National Treasure in 1956, and subsequently received the Order of Cultural Merit from Okayama for his lifework. For more see the new important tome by the Miho Museum: The Bizen (2019) according to which “He formed the Bizen Pottery Society, mentored the younger generation, participated in the founding of the Japan Kogei Association and built the foundations for the postwar success of Bizen ware”.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1441392 (stock #1677)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular silver and gold lid covers this small basin by Tomimoto Kenkichi enclosed in a wooden box titled Aka-e Tsutsugata Yunomi and annotated within: Made by Tomimoto Kenkichi Sensei in 1925 signed by Tsujimoto Isamu (for more on him see below). The cup is covered inside with creamy white, outside in red with decoration of gold plum blossoms. It is surmounted by a solid silver lid pierced with leafy vines and peaked with a gold chrysanthemum. The cup is 7 cm (2-3/4 inches) diameter and in perfect condition, signed inside the foot.
Tomimoto Kenkichi (1886-1963) is one of Japan's finest and most important ceramic artists ever, voted the number one most influential potter of the 20th century by Honoho Magazine. He was born into a privileged family in Nara, and would spend part of his youth in England studying design and manufacturing techniques. In 1950, Tomimoto became the first professor to the Ceramic Section of the Department of Crafts, Kyoto City University of Arts. He was also involved in a number of art associations and art universities throughout his life and trained many influential ceramic artists of modern Japan. He would be appointed member of the Japan Imperial Art Academy, as well as designated an intangible cultural asset (Mukei Bunkazai or Living National Treasure), and awarded the Order of Cultural Merit. For an excellent read see the recent article by John Wright in Arts of Asia.
Tsujimoto Isamu was a patron and great collector of the works of Tomimoto during the artists lifetime. Following his death Isamu created the Tomimoto Kenkichi Kinenkan Museum, and served as the first director there.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1441202 (stock #1673)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fabulous vase in the form of a rice pestle by Bizen Living National Treasure Kaneshige Toyo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen Kine-gata Hanaire (Vase in the Shape of a Pestle). A fabulous range of colors plays across the surface, all natural kiln effects resulting from heat, cold, clay content and placement. The vase is 26 cm (10 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes with a custom made black lacquered wooden outer box to protect the original box.
Kaneshige Toyo (1896-1967) is one of the leaders of the group of artisans who sought to revive the tradition as it was flagging to extinction in the pre-war years and considered one of the most important figures in 20th century Bizen. It is Toyo who has been credited with having rediscovered the techniques of the Azuchi Momoyama period. Born in Bizen, Okayama prefecture, into the potting family of artisan Kaneshige Baiyo, Toyo began working with clay in 1910. By the 1930’s, he was thoroughly ensconced in the research of ancient techniques. Over the next 20 years, he was to become a leading figure in Japanese pottery, and lifelong friend of Kawakita Handeishi, Kitaoji Rosanjin and Miwa Kyuwa. Post-war, in an effort to elevate Japanese pottery, he, along with Arakawa Toyozo and Kato Tokuro, helped to establish the Nihon Kogei kai (Japan Art Crafts Association). He was designated Living National Treasure in 1956, and subsequently received the Order of Cultural Merit from Okayama for his lifework. For more see the new important tome by the Miho Museum: The Bizen (2019) according to which “He formed the Bizen Pottery Society, mentored the younger generation, participated in the founding of the Japan Kogei Association and built the foundations for the postwar success of Bizen ware”.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1441158 (stock #1672)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A spectacular Mizusashi fresh water container by Bizen Living National Treasure Kaneshige Toyo enclosed in a wooden box annotated by his son Kaneshige Kosuke titled Bizen Yahazuguchi Mizusashi. A fabulous range of colors plays across the surface, all natural kiln effects resulting from heat, cold, clay content and placement. The receptacle is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) tall and comes with a custom made black lacquer wooden lid.
Kaneshige Toyo (1896-1967) is one of the leaders of the group of artisans who sought to revive the tradition as it was flagging to extinction in the pre-war years and considered one of the most important figures in 20th century Bizen. It is Toyo who has been credited with having rediscovered the techniques of the Azuchi Momoyama period. Born in Bizen, Okayama prefecture, into the potting family of artisan Kaneshige Baiyo, Toyo began working with clay in 1910. By the 1930’s, he was thoroughly ensconced in the research of ancient techniques. Over the next 20 years, he was to become a leading figure in Japanese pottery, and lifelong friend of Kawakita Handeishi, Kitaoji Rosanjin and Miwa Kyuwa. Post-war, in an effort to elevate Japanese pottery, he, along with Arakawa Toyozo and Kato Tokuro, helped to establish the Nihon Kogei kai (Japan Art Crafts Association). He was designated Living National Treasure in 1956, and subsequently received the Order of Cultural Merit from Okayama for his lifework. For more see the new important tome by the Miho Museum: The Bizen (2019) according to which “He formed the Bizen Pottery Society, mentored the younger generation, participated in the founding of the Japan Kogei Association and built the foundations for the postwar success of Bizen ware”.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1429552 (stock #1546)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
Five Sake Cups by the ;legendary Okabe Mineo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seto-Te Hai. The cups hav a very intimate feel, tiny, just enough room for a shot, each in a different style of Mino ware: Shino, E- Shino, Ki-Seto, Nezumi Shino, and Ao-Oribe. Each cup is 4.5 cm (1-3/4 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition. It even includes the artists biography from the time, still early in his career, likely 1950s.
Okabe Mineo (1919-1990) was born the first son of important artist Kato Tokuro, however the relationship with his father was volatile. When he was 9 Tokuro moved the young family to Seto, where Mineo would graduate the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics School in 1937. After a year at the family kiln, he moved to Tokyo, then joined the army in 1940. He fought against the Americans and would spend several years as a prisoner of war in the Philippines, repatriated to Japan in 1947. He returned to Aichi prefecture, leaving enough distance between himself and his estranged family, and with his wife began producing pottery in Toyoda. In 1953 he met Koyama Fujio; that same year he was awarded the Hokuto prize at the Nitten, and his work was collected by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This was the true beginning of his career. In 1955 he received the JCS award, one of the highest honors for a Japanese potter. By the mid ‘60s. he moved to celadon ware. He changed his name from Kato to Okabe in 1978, to honor his wife who supported his efforts for so many years.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1429253 (stock #1543)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Raised designs in slip decorate the yellow glaze of this deep bowl by Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in a kiriwood box titled O-yu Tsutsugaki-mon Wan annotated by Kawai Toshitaka, current head of the Kawai Kanjiro Museum. This piece dates from later in the artists illustrious career, 1950s-1960s. It is 4 inches (10 cm) diameter, 3-1/4 inches (5 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1970 item #1428698 (stock #1534)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A set of colorful Tokkuri in the shape of squared gourds by Living National Treasure Kato Hajime enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Aka-e Hohyo Tokkuri (red glazed Tokkuri in squared gourd form). About the white bottom are fortuitous characters in green with a belt of blue, yellow and green in the center. They are 15.5 cm (6 inches) tall. There is slight rubbing of the red glaze typical of handling. Enclosed with them is a photocopy from an art book (unknown publication) with an identical set of Tokkuri and the artists biography up until his death in 1968.
Kato Hajime (1900-1968, sometimes referred to as Toshiro, an alternate reading of his name) was born in Seto city, home of a long pottery tradition. However, after serving briefly at the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics School, he moved to rural Mino in Gifu in 1926, another locale long known for its pottery tradition. The following year he was awarded at the 8th Imperial Art Academy Exhibition, the same year was accepted at the first Crafts division Exhibition of the Bunten National Exhibition. In 1937 he would be awarded at the Paris World Exposition. From 1940 he would move to Yokohama, where he would delve extensively into the techniques of Ming decorated porcelain. From 1955 he would serve as head of the ceramics department and the Tokyo National University of Art. His career culminated in being named one of the early Living National Treasures (Juyo Mukei Bunkazai) in 1961. In 1966, he became the president of the Japan Crafts Association and also became an expert committee member on the Council for Protection of Cultural Properties. In 1967 he became professor emeritus of the Tokyo University of the Art. The same year he was awarded the Imperial Order of Cultural Merit (Purple Ribbon) by the reigning Emperor. He was commissioned to decorate the Take-no-ma audience room of the new Imperial Palace in Tokyo.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1428285 (stock #1530)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Dramatic waves are combed into the clay surface of this large Toban Platter by Living National Treasure Suzuki Osamu (Kura) covered in glass-like copper green; unusually signed and dated on bottom 1957 and enclosed in an artist signed wooden box. This has the wow factor in truckloads! A quintessential piece by this influential artist showing not only the innovation early in his career, but the consistency with which he approached Mino pottery, Museum quality, sure to become a centerpiece of any collection. It is 53.5 x 31 cm (21 x 12 inches) and in excellent condition.
Suzuki Osamu was born in Gifu prefecture in 1934, and graduated the Tajimi Technical School ceramics division in 1953. That same year he was awarded at the 6th Dento Kogeiten Traditional Crafts Exhibition. One of the great researchers, he spent many years excavating old kiln sites in an effort to re-invent Mino ware. In 1962 he was exhibited in Prague. And the next year took a prize at the Asahi Ceramic Exhibition. Very much lauded at this time, it culminated in 1969 when he received the JCS Gold award (Japan Ceramic Society), one of the highest honors for a Japanese potter. He would receive the JCS award again in 1982, and by that point be nurturing or inspiring a number of young potters aspiring to the forgotten ways of Shino ware. He was named a Living National Treasure in 1994 for his life-work. Work by him is held in a multitude of public collections throughout the world. For more see “Japanese Studio Crafts, Tradition and the Avant-Garde” (1995) by R. Faulkner.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1428174 (stock #1528)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A small bowl in Kaki-yu by important artist Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in a wooden box upon which his friend and equally important artist Munakata Shiko has painted an image of the bowl outside titled Go-Kowan (Honorable small bowl) and inside annotated: Kanjiro Sensei Saku (Made by Kanjiro), signed Munakata Shiko. It is 10 cm (4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro (1890-1966) was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
Munakata Shiko (1903-1975) is a dominant figure in Japanese twentieth-century prints. He was also very active as a poet, critic, painter in both Western and Japanese techniques, calligrapher and book designer. Munakata was born in Aomori in northern Honshu, the sixth of fifteen children of a forger of steel blades. Leaving school at thirteen, he joined the family business, but moved to a lawyer's office at seventeen, which gave him time to sketch. In 1921 he first saw reproductions of Van Gogh's works, which remained arguably his greatest inspiration throughout his life, and began to teach himself oil-painting. He moved to Tokyo in 1924, and lived by various means including drawing educational charts while continuing to paint He was accepted at the Teiten (Imperial Exhibition) in 1928. He became inspired by woodblock prints and by 1927 was experimenting with woodblocks. The following year he had his first prints accepted at the Creative Print Association Exhibition. In 1931 he had his first one-man show of prints in Tokyo. Munakata began to write in 'Han geijutsu' magazine in 1932, which brought him into contact with Maekawa Senpan and the folk style. He fell into the circle of the Folk Art Movement with its great potter Kawai Kanjiro, and i 1936 he spent 40 days at Kawai's house where he developed a Buddhist dimension to add to his already strong folk and Shinto interests and subject-matter. The two remained lifelong friends. His home in Tokyo was destroyed in the second world war, and he spent seven years in Toyama, at the end of which his work was accepted in São Paolo in 1951, which marks the beginning of his subsequent international career. In 1952 he helped establish the Japanese Print Institute. In 1952 he won a prize at Lugano and in 1955 the first prize for prints at the São Paolo Biennale, and in 1956 at the Venice Biennale. These made his reputation not only internationally but also at home, where he now became a celebrity and was subsequently heaped with honours culminating with the 'Kunsho' (Order of Merit) in 1970. The Munakata Memorial Museum in Aomori opened the day after his funeral. There is also a museum devoted to his prints in Kamakura, while large collections of his works are in the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, the Folk Art Museum, Tokyo, and the Ohara Museum Complex in Kurashiki.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1424726 (stock #1501)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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I have seen a lot of work over the last quarter century by Kawai Kanjiro, and among it all, this is an absolute stunner. 'Museum quality' as a quote gets thrown around a lot, but I do not use it lightly. The form, the clarity of the white, the crispness of the lines of color and his obvious deft touch. It ranks among the top ten percent I have seen by this important artist without a doubt. The vessel is 19 x 12.5 x 16.5 cm (7-1/2 x 5 x 6-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in the original signed high-quality kiri-wood Shiho-buta box titled Hana-Henko. For similar works see the Katsukawa collection published in the biblical tome by the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1423337 (stock #1489)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A bunch of grapes in slight color under shadowy cool leaves decorate the milky white and sand toned surface of this very unusual plate by Kitaoji Rosanjin enclosed in a wooden box annotated by Living National Treasure Arakawa Toyozo dated 1968. It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kitaoji Rosanjin (1883-1959) They say adversity is the mother of invention, and Rosanjin can be said to epitomize that expression. Born during the tumultuous first half of the Meiji period in the cultural center of Kyoto, he was adopted at age six by a woodblock carver. He showed an early genius for calligraphy, and began his early manhood as a carver of seals and carver/painter of shop signs after a brief apprenticeship to a pharmacy. He also taught calligraphy and bought and sold antiques during these early years. In 1921 he founded what would become the impetus for his life’s work, his first restaurant, the Bishoku club, and followed in 1925 with a restaurant in Tokyo called the Hoshigaoka. Rosanjin began working in ceramics to replace the collection of dishes that was destroyed in the 1923 Kanto Earthquake. He was largely a self-taught artist with a diverse range, beginning with a kiln on his rented property .in Kamakura, and later paying visits for brief apprenticeships to many of the days top artists. He retired to work exclusively on the arts in 1936. Magazine editor, lacquer artist, metal-working and finally store owner in Tokyo’s Ginza, Rosanjin was everywhere at once. He was displayed at the museum of Modern Art in New York in 1954, a rare honor indeed for living artist. Like his contemporary, Kawai Kanjiro, Rosanjin was offered the title of Living National Treasure in 1955 for his work in Oribe pottery, but refused the offer.
Arakawa Toyozo (1894-1985) was born in Tajimi,the ancient home of Shino and Oribe wares. In 1922 he met Kitaoji Rosanjin I Kyoto, and became his apprentice, working at the Hoshigaoka kiln in Kamakura until 1933. He moved back to Gifu and devoted his life to re-creating Shino and yellow-and-black Seto wares of the Momoyama period. He, along with Kato Tokuro, is responsible for the revival of Mino ware. He was designated Living National Treasure in 1955, and received the Order of Cultural Merit in 1971.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1423237 (stock #1488)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fabulous Bizen Tane-Tsubo Seed Jar in the Momoyama style by Living National Treasure Kaneshige Toyo enclosed in a wooden box annotated by Kaneshige Kosuke. Beautiful Hi-iro flame coloring brightens the sides and a smattering of yellow flying ash clings to the shoulder about a line of waves. The tsubo is marked on the base with the fundo weight mark of Toyo. It is 23.5 cm (9 inches) tall, 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
It comes with a photograph of the artist’s son, Kaneshige Kosuke, holding the jar, the photograph annotated: Toyo-saku Bizen Tane Tsubo sealed and signed by Kosuke.
Kaneshige Toyo (1896-1967) is one of the leaders of the group of artisans who sought to revive the tradition as it was flagging to extinction in the pre-war years and considered one of the most important figures in 20th century Bizen. It is Toyo who has been credited with having rediscovered the techniques of the Azuchi Momoyama period. Born in Bizen, Okayama prefecture, into the potting family of artisan Kaneshige Baiyo, Toyo began working with clay in 1910. By the 1930’s, he was thoroughly ensconced in the research of ancient techniques. Over the next 20 years, he was to become a leading figure in Japanese pottery, and lifelong friend of Kawakita Handeishi, Kitaoji Rosanjin and Miwa Kyuwa. Post-war, in an effort to elevate Japanese pottery, he, along with Arakawa Toyozo and Kato Tokuro, helped to establish the Nihon Kogei kai (Japan Art Crafts Association). He was designated Living National Treasure in 1956, and subsequently received the Order of Cultural Merit from Okayama for his lifework. For more see the new important tome by the Miho Museum: The Bizen (2019) according to which “He formed the Bizen Pottery Society, mentored the younger generation, participated in the founding of the Japan Kogei Association and built the foundations for the postwar success of Bizen ware”.