Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1351229 (stock #1076)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A superb example of the work of this Living National Treasure, 8 inches (21 cm) diameter, 7-1/2 inches (19 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Designated Living National Treasure in 1997 for his supremacy in the use of Kutani glazes, Yasokichi, born Masahiko, has gone a step further than many National Treasures by broadening his spectrum with a new style of Kutani ware. Masahiko graduated from the Kanazawa school of arts, and took up apprenticeship under his father Yasokichi II. His works are held by many private collections, as well as the Polk museum and Kanazawa Contemporary Museum of Art.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 2000 item #1350891 (stock #1073)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Orange peel textured black Chawan by Samukawa Seiho I (Yoshikazu 1899-1975) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kishu Yaki Nacchi-guro Chawan. It is 5-1/4 inches (13.5 cm) diameter, 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Born in Osaka in 1900 and raised in Kyoto, Samukawa Seiho I began his apprenticeship in tea ware under Sawada Muneyama in 1919. With a letter of introduction he entered the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics Research Facility in 1927. In 1935 he moved to the Buddhist enclave of Koyasan in Wakayama where he established his first kiln. He succeeded with the development of this Nacchi-guro glaze in 1956, and it became one of the signature features of his work. In 1962, his tea bowl was presented to the Emperor. Five years later he would move, re-establishing his kiln in Shirahama-cho. He was awarded the Bunka Rodosho Cultural Prize in 1970, and in 1972 the Wakayama Order of Cultural Merit.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1350890 (stock #969)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A proud form of a fulling block inscribed with a wave pattern in the raw clay of the base and covered in ame-yu glaze by Inoue Toya enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 9-1/2 inches (24 cm) tall, 6 inches (15 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Inoue Toya (1942-2013), graduated the prestigious Nihon Daigaku in 1966, having spent his student years excavating ancient Karatsu shards and researching their techniques. He apprenticed under the multifaceted potter Nushi Ensai. In 1969 he opened his own kiln. He served as head of the Karatsu Ceramic Cooperative from 1983-2010 while focusing on private exhibitions held at Department stores and galleries throughout Japan. In 2008 his lifetime achievements were recognized with a private exhibition in Los Angeles.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1350263 (stock #1040)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A whimsical koro by Takauchi Shugo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled oribe Koro. It appears to dance, two arms up in the air with the music, a slight jaunt in its three legged step. It is 11 inches (28 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Takauchi Shugo was born in Tokyo in 1937. He opened his kiln in Mashiko at the age of 31. He has exhibited at the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition, Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition and as well as Gendai Nihon Togeiten National Modern Ceramics Exhibition in addition to innumerable public and private exhibitions. He is recipient of the Order of Cultural Merrit from Tochigi Prefecture, and his works have been selected for international exhibitions (Paris, London, Denmark and America) and work by him is held in the V&A, The Art Gallery of New South Wales. For more see the Book “Japanese Studio Crafts” (1995) by Rupert Faulkner of “Fired with Passion” (2006) by Beatrice Chang and Samuel J Lurie.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Cups : Contemporary item #1347063 (stock #1060)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A set of 8 sake cups by members of Sodeisha enclosed in a singular compartmentalized wooden box titled Yose-hai and signed Sodeisha followed by the Sodeisha stamp. Sodeisha (Crawling Through Mud Association) is a group of revolutionary post war ceramic artists whose influence remains strong today. Artists in this set include: Suzuki Osamu, Toba Yoshimasa, Kanaegae Kazutaka, Kawamura Sachiko, Yoshitake Hiromu, Inoue Midori, Nakanishi Kosuke and Tsuji Kanji.
Suzuki Osamu (1926-2001) was, along with Kumakura Junkichi, Hikaru Yamada and Yagi Kazuo, one of the founding members of Sodeisha. He studied pottery at the Daini Kogyo Gakko in Kyoto. In 1948 he helped to establish Sodeisha. He received the JCS award in 1959 (and was granted the rare gold award in 1983). In 1962 he was awarded at the Prague International Ceramics Expo, the first of many international awards. In 1987 he was granted the Order of Cultural Merit by Kyoto Prefecture, followed by the same award from Kyoto City in 1993 and 1994. He exhibited with Sodeisha, The National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togeiten) among others. Works by him are in too many collections to note in this small add, including the Kyoto and Tokyo National Museums of Modern Art, Victoria Albert and New York Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1346120 (stock #1057)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A traditional shape called Kinuta (fulling block) draped with ochre glaze over charred blacks by Tsukigata Nahiko wrapped in a brocade bag and enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Oni Shino Kinuta Hana-Ike which is in turn enclosed in a black lacquered wooden double-wood storage box. A Kinuta (fulling block) is a small wooden mallet used to beat silk into a soft texture. It is a very traditional shape in Japanese pottery. This is 9 inches (23 cm) tall and in excellent condition. A superlative example of this artists work.
Tsukigata Nahiko (1923-2006) was not only an accomplished ceramic artist, but also a painter, calligrapher, sculptor and musician. Born in Niigata prefecture, he was at Waseda University in 1941 when he was summarily drafted into the Army. After the war he attended the Arts course of Nippon Daigaku University and was struck by the works of Living National Treasure Arakawa Toyozo, to whom he apprenticed in the arts of Shino and took his mentors work to a new level. Like all art, his was alive and always evolving. Starting with the replication and research of Momoyama techniques to the culmination of his efforts in Oni-shino, Nahiko has taken Shino beyond all others. It was not an easy road, for the first 15 years he worked for a ballet school, spent time as a recluse priest at Myoanji temple, and wandered the country playing the shakuhachi. It was a time of great change in Japan, starvation was rampant immediately after the war and supporting oneself through the little known art of Shino-yaki was difficult. However he persevered, along with Toyozo, Kato Juuemon, Kato Kohei and others, to bring Shino to the forefront of ceramic arts. Heavily prized domestically and abroad in his lifetime, his low output and unique quality make his work a must have for collectors. Ayukai Kogetsu was a female artist from Miyagi prefecture who became a student and follower of Tsukigata in 1979. She currently takes part in calligraphy and ceramic exhibitions throughout Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1346117 (stock #1056)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Bidoro rain down like a glass bead curtain over the terracotta clay of this Shigaraki Tsubo by Takahashi Shunsai enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 8-1/4 inches (20.5 cm) tall and in fine condition.
Born in 1927, the second son of renowned potter Takahashi Rakusai III in Shigaraki, Takahashi Shunsai left home to study under Taniguchi Ryosai in Kyoto before returning to Shigaraki to pursue his studies of Shigaraki styles specifically under his father and spent the better part of two decades working from that studio. He established his own kiln in 1968. He has been displayed at the Nitten, Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition), Nihon Togei ten (National Ceramics Exhibition), Asahi Ceramics Exhibition, as well as a long list of private exhibitions at Japan’s top galleries. He has been often prized as a master of Shigaraki, and has been designated a Shiga Prefectural Intangable Cultural Property (Treasure) in 1995.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1344548 (stock #1041)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Camellia blossom on this flattened form by Ito Motohiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Nunome Tsubaki Mon Kabin (Cloth Texture Vase with Camellia Design). It is 10 inches (26 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
The artist is a famous Kasama potter, best known for his nunome pattern and exceptional designs. Motohiko was born in Fukuoka prefecture, 1939, and graduated the Tokyo University of Art in 1964, then moved on to advanced courses there, finishing in 1966. While at University he studied under Kato Hajime and Fujimoto Yoshimichi. It was in 1967 his first piece was accepted into the 6th Modern National Crafts Exhibition, and the next year would be spent working under to-be-Living National Treasure Matsui Kosei. His list of prizes and exhibitions is much too long to reproduce, but since 1967, he has Exhibited with the Nihon Dento Kogeiten, Nihon Dento Kogei Shinsaku Ten, Dento Kogei Musashino Ten, Tanabe Museum Modern Tea Forms Exhibition, been the subject of an NHK Television documentary, and participated in a ridiculous number of private exhibits at many of Japans top venues, and has been purchased by the current Emperor in person as well as receiving the Shijuho-sho prize from his majesty.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1340363 (stock #1011)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Mottled blue in thick textured drips run down the sides over ashen glaze on this 4 eared Tsubo by Sakuchi Ensen enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The thickness of the drips adds a tactile sense to this piece, compelling the hands to reach out and touch. It is 11-1/2 inches (29.5 cm) tall 9 inches (23 cm) diameter and in fine condition. The box lid is stained.
Sakuchi Ensen (B. 1922) began on the path of the potter in 1946, searching to create something unusual in the hils of Okayama. His research led him to create this highly decorative yet wildly natural glaze he came to call Hishhoku Nanban Yaki.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1337565 (stock #996)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular Iga Tsubo by Shimizu Hiroshi enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Bidoro, Tombo-no-me, tobi-hai, shiseki…the surface is an exploration of kiln affects, every slight turn bringing new surprises. It is 15 inches (38.5 cm) diameter, 17 inches (43 cm) tall and in excellent condition. Due to size the cost of shipping will be accrued separately.
Shimizu Hiroshi was born the grandson of the first generation potter Shimizu Rakuzan in Mie prefecture in1941. He began working under his grandfather in 1959, going on a study tour from 1961; spending time in Takatori, Tamba and Hagi. He opened his own kiln in Mie in 1970, but the following year decided to move to Korea to study the origins of Japanese Tea Ceramics and Korean firing technique. He opened his own kiln in Korea in 1974 and developed a style combining Japanese tradition and Korean techniques, continuing this development throughout his career, and differentiates the origin of his works with the kiln name in Korea or the kiln name in Japan on the box lid. This is from his original kiln in Mie.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Jars : Contemporary item #1337500 (stock #995)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Blasted and dripping with ash, a spectacular Shigaraki Mizusashi by Tanimoto Yo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A shell juts from raw rippled wood lid like it was sticking up from the ripples of sand on a beach. It is 21.5 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall 18.5 cm (7 inches) diameter and in fine condition. Born in 1958 the son of Iga potter Tanimoto Kosei, Yo was raised among the kilns and has always had his hands in clay. He first began exhibiting in 1982, and in 1984 moved to Europe where he studied oil painting and sculpture (in Spain), and set up a pottery studio outside Paris. After returning to Japan he set uphis own studio in 1988, working both in Japan and and Spain. Since his works have been exhibited widely, both domestically and abroad in New York, London, Barcelona and Paris.
The box has been once broken and repaired, the mizusashi undamaged.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Jars : Pre 2000 item #1337191 (stock #992)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A black lacquered lid covers the opening of this exquisite mizusashi by Tsukigata Nahiko enclosed in a wooden box titled Oni Shino Mizusashi and endorsed by his student Ayukai Kogetsu. It is 7-1/2 inches (19 cm) diameter, 6 inches (15.5 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Tsukigata Nahiko (1923-2006) was not only an accomplished ceramic artist, but also a painter, calligrapher, sculptor and musician. Born in Niigata prefecture, he was at Waseda University in 1941 when he was summarily drafted into the Army. After the war he attended the Arts course of Nippon Daigaku University and was struck by the works of Living National Treasure Arakawa Toyozo, to whom he apprenticed in the arts of Shino and took his mentors work to a new level. Like all art, his was alive and always evolving. Starting with the replication and research of Momoyama techniques to the culmination of his efforts in Oni-shino, Nahiko has taken Shino beyond all others. It was not an easy road, for the first 15 years he worked for a ballet school, spent time as a recluse priest at Myoanji temple, and wandered the country playing the shakuhachi. It was a time of great change in Japan, starvation was rampant immediately after the war and supporting oneself through the little known art of Shino-yaki was difficult. However he persevered, along with Toyozo, Kato Juuemon, Kato Kohei and others, to bring Shino to the forefront of ceramic arts. Heavily prized domestically and abroad in his lifetime, his low output and unique quality make his work a must have for collectors. Ayukai Kogetsu was a female artist from Miyagi prefecture who became a student and follower of Tsukigata in 1979. She currently takes part in calligraphy and ceramic exhibitions throughout Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Jars : Pre 2000 item #1336436 (stock #986)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A superb Iga Mizusashi by Saji Kotaro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 7 inches (18 cm) diameter, 7-1/2 inches (19 cm) tall and in excellent condition. Saji Kotaro was born in 1947, and relocated to Tajimi in 1977 where he opened a kiln in Yamabuki cho specializing in tea ceramics.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1336430 (stock #973)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Ash encrusts one side of this flattened Signature form by Shigaraki Legend Furutani Michio enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Opposite is rich red terracotta and in between rivers of molten green glass. It is 45 cm (17-1/2 inches) diameter, and weighs 14 kg (30 pounds) plus the thick Kiri-wood box. This belongs in a museum of contemporary Japanese pottery.
Furutani Michio is one of the Gods of Shigaraki, an artist who wrote the book on Anagama kilns, and one of the more influential artists of the second half of the 20th century. He was born in Shigaraki; graduating the Konan High School of industrial Arts, he moved to further his studies (like so many great artist before him, Kanjiro, Hamada…) at the Kyoto Institute of Industrial Arts in 1964. After breaking out on his own, he started by building an Anagama in Shigaraki in 1970, the first since the middle ages. He was a true pioneer, reviving the tradition and going on to build over thirty kilns over the next thirty years. No other artist has shown such singular dedication to a firing technique. He has been featured in the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (Japanese Traditional Crafts Exhibition), Nihon Togei Ten (Japanese Ceramic Exhibition) and the Chunichi Kokusai Togei Ten among others. He passed away at the peak of his career. For more on this artists contributions see his book Anagama – Building Kilns and Firing.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Cups : Contemporary item #1334070 (stock #974)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Superb Shigaraki Chawan by Sugimoto Sadamitsu enclosed in the original wooden box signed beneath by the artist and endorsed by Tea Master Tachibana Daiki of Daitokuji Temple. It is 4 x 5 x 3-1/2 inches (10.5 x 13 x 9 cm) and is in fine condition.
Sugimoto Sadamitsu was born in Tokyo in 1935. A strong adherent to the Zen tradition, Sadamitsu established his own kiln at 33, receiving the kiln name from his mentor Daitokuji priest Tachibana Oki. His Zen studies have refined the spiritual side of his work, and all of his wood fired ceramics have a quiet and confident power. He has spent his life in the research of kohiki, Shigaraki Iga and Raku wares, and is more than well known in tea circles for the discriminating soul of his works. For more information on this artist see the book Fired with passion : contemporary Japanese ceramics ISBN 1-891640-38-0.
Tachibana Daiki (1898-2005) born in Osaka, entered the Buddhist orders at Nansoji. He later moved to Myoshinji in Kyoto where he received Inka. He would go on to serve as the 511th abbot of Daitokuji, and be given the reins of Nyoian in Tokusenji, a subtemple of Daitokuji. He would serve as head of Hanazono University and was a strong proponent of The Way of Tea.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1334011 (stock #973)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fine Tenmoku Glazed pot with Pine needle design by Kimura Moriyasu dating circa 1985 enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 8 inches (20 cm) tall and in fine condition. A vase with this same glaze is held in the National Palace Museum, Taiwan.
Kimura Moriyasu (b. 1935) studied pottery initially at the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (which turned out such masters as Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro) and then under his brother Kimura Morikazu. He is well known for his use of crawling and oil spot glazes. He exhibits with the Gendai Nihon Togeiten and Nihon Dento Kogeiten among others. He has been awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Order of Cultural Merit (2004). Work by him is held in the Britush Museum, Boston Museum, Dallas Museum and Ise Shrine among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Contemporary item #1333294 (stock #965)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An Oribe Dai-hachi footed basin by Koie Ryoji enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 11 x 7-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches (28 x 19 x 9 cm) and is in excellent condition. A few pre-firing chips are shown in the close-ups, glaze over-running theedges proof that they happened before the piece was fired.
Born in Tokoname, 1938, Koie Ryoji graduated the Tokoname industrial school and moved on to work at the City Ceramic Research Facility. In 1966 he established his own studio. Largely displayed and prized, he was most recently awarded the Japan Ceramic Society Gold Award in 2009, the most prestigious of pottery prizes in Japan
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1330304 (stock #963)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A book of Yagi Kazuo works (number 203 of 800) dated 1969 with the cover inlaid with a ceramic work signed and dated Feb. 1967. Dozens of photographs of his work dating from the height of his fame as an avante Garde sculptor fill this 100 page book titled Simply “Yagi Kazuo”. The book comes in the original cover which is held inside a cardboard sleeve. The ends of the cover not encased in cardboard have yellowed some with age, but this does not affect the book within.