Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Cups : Contemporary item #1409596 (stock #1364)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite black clay guinomi from Tokoname engraved with white lines by Shibata Yoshiaki enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 2-1/2 inches (7 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Yoshiaki is credited with having discovered the secret of this black clay, now in use by any number of atists in Tokoname. He was born in 1946, and apprenticed under Living National Treasure Yamada Jozan, becoming one of his top pupils. He established his own kiln in 1965 producing traditional tea ware as well as art objects. In 1972 he was recognized at the Vallauris International Ceramics Exhibition, and has had innumerable public and private exhibitions since.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1409487 (stock #1363)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An ever-folding band of gold flecked fabric patterned with colors and waves like an elaborate obi (sash) seems to bind the cloak of rough dark clay forming this vase by Nakamura Takuo (Baizan III) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Atop a gilded Karasu-guchi finial, a tradtional shape called a Crows Mouth, provides the top and a spattering of ash sprays out a random pattern against the rigid form. It is 21 x 7.5 x 31 cm (8 x 3 x 12 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Nakamura Baizan (Takuo) was born in 1945, the second son of Baizan II. After working a regular job for a while, he returned to Kanazawa in 1978 to apprentice under his father, finding he could not get pottery out of his skin. His dark forms wrapped in iridescent colors like colorful obi on a subdued Kimono have received much acclaim, and his work is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, Chicago Museum of Art, and the Kanazawa 21st century Museum of Contemporary Art among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1408943 (stock #1359)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Molten glaze in volcanic plumes extending from a yellow blast wrap tendrils around this exquisite Bizen vessel by Baba Takashi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen Yohen Tsubo. The kiln effects are spectacular, covering the blackened Bizen clay with yellows, charcoals and a myriad of natural tones. It is quite large at 15 x 13 x 9-1/2 inches (38 x 33 x 24 cm) and is in new condition. Depending upon destination, special shipping consideration may be required.
At 36, Baba is one of the younger potters in our Autumn show. He was born into a traditional potting family in Bizen in 1983, and his genius is recognized as a graduate of the sculpture department of the prestigious Tokyo University of Art in 2006. He followed up with a year at the Kyoto Industrial Ceramics Research Facility beore taking up residence again in Okayama. His work was immediately recognized at the Okayama Prefectural Art Exhibition, , and the Bizen Toshinkai Exhibition, where he has received several awards. His work has also been seen in the Nihon Dento Kogeiten (Traditional Crafts Exhibition, Chanoyu Zokeiten Eshibition (Modern Forms in Tea) and he has been featured with a show in Britain in 2015.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1406948 (stock #1351)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A very unusual work by the challenging artist Nakata Atsushi covered in red lacquer with modern designs enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled URUSHI TEA BOWL. It is 11.5 x 13.5 x 9.5 cm (4-1/2 x 5-1/4 x 3-3/4 inches) and is in New condition.
Nakata Atsushi was born in Toyama in 1968, and studied in the blossoming field of videography at Osaka University of Art however chose the path of potter after working at a friends kiln while at school. He graduated in 1992, then apprenticed under Imai Yasuhito famed for his tea ware. In 1996 Atsushi set out on his own in Ueno City, Mie prefecture (the center of Iga ware). He uses lacquer in most of his works, which requires typically three firings, and his work is characterized by its contemporary design and utilitarian forms.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1990 item #1405617 (stock #1350)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A four sided vase in Aka-e design by important 20th century potter Kawamoto Goro enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Aka-e Kamon Hanaike exhibited in 2001 and published in the book Kawamoto Rekitei, Goro, Taro, San-Dai-Ten (Three Generations of Kawamoto Family). It is 27.5 cm (11 inches) tall, 16 cm (6 inches) square and in excellent condition. The Book is included.
Kawamoto Goro (1919-1986) was born in Seto to a family of potters. He studied in Kyoto at the same institution as Kawai Kanjiro and Hamada Shoji. Returning to work at the family kiln, he was later adopted by Kawamoto Rekitei, a famous decorator of pottery. In 1953 he gained first recognition, accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition and garnering top prize at the Asahi Modern Ceramics Exhibition. In 1958 he would be awarded in Brussels, and in 1959 in California and at home was granted the 1959 JCS award, perhaps the most significant honor for a pottery in Japan. Much lauded in and after his lifetime, the list of awards is far too long for this article. Work by him is held in the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art as well as the The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1404578 (stock #1348)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite vessel by Bizen legend Yamamoto Toshu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen Meipin. The form is perfection, covered with a dusting of ash revealing a flame colored eye on one side, everything about the proportions timeless. This is a piece I could wax on for hours about, but will leave that up to the viewer. It is 8 inches (20.5 cm) tall and in perfect condition.
Yamamoto Toshu (1906-1994) began working in a pottery at the age of 15. 12 years later (1933) he went independent, but interestingly decided to train again later not under a Bizen master, but Kusube Yaichi, perhaps stimulating his unusual eye for Bizen. After much acclaim, it was in 1959 that he made his worldwide appearance, with a gold prize at the Brussels World Exposition, and was named an important cultural property of Okayama that same year. He was most in love with the wheel, and his forms are crisp and sharp. He was named a living national Treasure in 1987. Works by the artist are held in the National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo and National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto as well as the Victoria Albert Museum among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1404273 (stock #1347)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Celadon is all about form, and here Yagi Akira has nailed it with this expertly executed elegant shape composed of 2 interlocking pieces covered in green celadon glaze and enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kakushaku (literally horn scoop). It is 4-3/4 inches (14.5 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
This name is a must have in any collection of modern Japanese Pottery. Akira was born in Kyoto in 1955, son of avant garde Yagi Kazuo (1918-1979) one of the founding members of Sodeisha. Akira was voted one of the 20 most important living artists by Honoho, Japans premier printed ceramic forum. Works by the artist are held in the British Museum, Victoria Albert Museum, Cleveland Art Museum, Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian and Tokyo Muesum of Modern Art among many others. He was also the recipient of the Japan Ceramic Society (JCS) award in 1998, one in a long and prestigious list of awards.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1404156 (stock #1346)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Celadon is all about form, and here Yagi Akira has nailed it with this expertly executed architectural silhouette covered in pale blue-green glaze and enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 4-1/2 inches (14 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
This name is a must have in any collection of modern Japanese Pottery. Akira was born in Kyoto in 1955, son of avant garde Yagi Kazuo (1918-1979) one of the founding members of Sodeisha. Akira was voted one of the 20 most important living artists by Honoho, Japans premier printed ceramic forum. Works by the artist are held in the British Museum, Victoria Albert Museum, Cleveland Art Museum, Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian and Tokyo Muesum of Modern Art among many others. He was also the recipient of the Japan Ceramic Society (JCS) award in 1998, one in a long and prestigious list of awards.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1403878 (stock #1344)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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We have stood in line for years to acquire some work by this popular artist! This is a gold lined Natsume tea urn decorated with genuine platinum by Yamamoto Ichiyo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Jun-Platinum-sai Gingawa. The detail is breathtaking、like holding porcelain jewels. It is 3 inches (8 cm) tall and in perfect condition.
Yamamoto Ichiyo was born in Nagasaki in 1944. He began his career at an Arita Porcelain ceramic facility in 1969. In 1974 he would spend a year in Taiwan studying porcelain before returning to Japan, where he would establish his own kiln in Imari the following year. He would begin research into platinum glazing in the mid eighties, garnering awards in Paris three years running (1986, ’87, ’88) after which he would move to Takatsuki on the border between Osaka and Kyoto, where he would immerse himself in cultural studies. In 1993 he would move to Hyogo prefecture, then would begin a period where his fame would grow, while his roots in any one place did not, only returning to Imari nearly a decade later in 2001. Since his work has been exhibited throughout Japan and abroad in such places as Valencia, Los Angeles, New York and San Diego.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1403845 (stock #1343)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Pottery pouch covered in polka-dot silver glaze inspired by traditional textiles by pioneering female artist Tsuboi Asuka threaded with genuine silver couched chord and enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Tsuboi Asuka was born in Osaka in 1932, but the family moved to Tokyo when she was 12. She graduated the prestigious and progressive Jiyu Gakkuen (A progressive girls School established in 1921) then moved to Kyoto in 1953, Kyoto, the city she has called home for half a century, where she would spend a year at the Sentsuji Yusai Kobo before enlisting under Living National Treasure Tomimoto Kenkichi. Her first works were exhibited that year at the Shinshokogeikai (where she would be awarded in 1955). She worked to establish the Joryu Togei Ten Ceramic Exhibition for female artists in 1957, to allow women a venue to exhibit works in what was then a very male dominated field. In 1961 she was accepted into the Asahi Togeiten Ceramic Exhibition, and in 1966 would be selected to represent contemporary Japanese ceramics in China, the following year saw he take a study trip to Korea, and in 1970 to Thailand while her work was exhibited at the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, which would purchase her work in ’71 . She would be awarded at the Canadian International Ceramic Exhibition in 1973, and since her work has been exhibited throughout the globe. Here work to promote the arts was recognized in 1988 with the Kyoto Prefectural Order of Arts and Culture Award, and in 1991 with the Kyoto city Order of Cultural Merit, and again in 1992 with the prefectural Order of Cultural Merit. All culminated in her receiving the Japan Ceramic Society Gold prize, perhaps the most important award allowed a potter, in 2004. Her work can be found in Museum collections including several works in both the Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo and Kyoto, Fukui and Wakayama Prefectural Museums of Art, Suntory Museum, Shiga Togei No Mori Museum, Ariana Museum, Yale University Museum and The International Ceramics Museum in Faenza. According to the book Touch Fire: Tsuboi Asuka's influence on the ceramic arts of Japan cannot be overstated. As one of the first women to aggressively challenge the male hierarchy, she forged a role for women ceramic artists that previously did not exist in Japan. Tsuboi was the charismatic leader of the influential Kyoto women's ceramic group Joryū Tōgei (Women's Association of Ceramic Art) when it was first formed in 1957. This group was pivotal not only in providing a platform for women to participate as artists in their own right, but in giving them the opportunity to present their challenging work to the public.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1403725 (stock #1342)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A breathtaking work by Miyake Yoji enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Nuki-e Kinsai Sakura-mon Kaki. The unabashed use of gold on this piece is extraordinary. Quite large, it is 39 cm (15-1/2 inches) tall, 27 cm (11 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. This is a step beyond even for an artist known for his bold patterns and designs; this would make a powerful centerpiece for a collection of contemporary Japanese pottery.
Miyake Yoji was born in Shimane in 1950, He studied from 1974 under Ito Kosho, establishing himself as an independent artist three years later in Mashiko. In 1979 his work was accepted into the Dento Kogei Shinsaku Ten (New Exhibition of Traditional Crafts) and displayed there annually thereafter. In 1980 he was accepted into the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Crafts Exhibition), and many times thereafter. Again the following year he was accepted into yet another major exhibition with the Nihon Togei Ten (All Japan Ceramic Exhibition), once again followed up with repeated acceptance there. Yet in the 90s he turned away from the competitive world and began to concentrate more on private exhibitions, of which he has been hosted many times in some of Japans most prestigious galleries. He was also the subject of an NHK Television Documentary in 1998 and appeared in another in 2000.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1403328 (stock #1338)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Leaf images in various seasonal shades decorate the raw earth of these expertly crafted dishes by legendary artist Kitaoji Rosanjin, the set enclosed in a double box, the inner box the original age darkened kiri-wood box signed by Rosanjin, the outer box later covered in black lacquer showing the esteem for which both this dish set and box were afforded. On bottom is the star mark, indicating these were made for use in his restaurant. Each dish is roughly 18.8 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter and in overall excellent condition. An abrasion in the edge of one dish is pre-firing (see last photo). For nearly identical plates see Kitaoji Rosanjin Ten (Jap. 1988).
Kitaoji Rosanjin (1883-1959) They say adversity is the mother of invention, and Rosanjin can be said to epitomize that expression. Born during the tumultuous first half of the Meiji period in the cultural center of Kyoto, he was adopted at age six by a woodblock carver. He showed an early genius for calligraphy, and began his early manhood as a carver of seals and carver/painter of shop signs after a brief apprenticeship to a pharmacy. He also taught calligraphy and bought and sold antiques during these early years. In 1921 he founded what would become the impetus for his life’s work, his first restaurant, the Bishoku club, and followed in 1925 with a restaurant in Tokyo called the Hoshigaoka. Rosanjin began working in ceramics to replace the collection of dishes that was destroyed in the 1923 Kanto Earthquake. He was largely a self taught artist with a diverse range, beginning with a kiln on his rented property .in Kamakura, and later paying visits for brief apprenticeships to many of the days top artists. He retired to work exclusively on the arts in 1936. Magazine editor, lacquer artist, metal-working and finally store owner in Tokyo’s Ginza, Rosanjin was everywhere at once. He was displayed at the museum of Modern Art in New York in 1954, a rare honor indeed for living artist. Like his contemporary, Kawai Kanjiro, Rosanjin was offered the title of Living National Treasure in 1955 for his work in Oribe pottery, but refused the offer.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1403194 (stock #1335)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite work of micro-calligraphy by young female artist Tamura Seito IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Karakusa moyo koro. It is roughly 4 inches tall and in new condition. Tamura Seito is a fourth-generation potter and chosen to inherit the tradition of Saiji micro-calligraphy for the Tamura family. She graduated Tsukuba University in 2004, then began to study under Tamura Keisei. In 2007 she graduated the Ishikawa prefectural Kutani Research Center and began a fellowship there. In 2010 she established her own kiln in Komatsu, and the following year changed her name from Natsuko to Seito.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Contemporary item #1402607 (stock #1334)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An organic form like some wavering anemone built from tiny curls of rolled ceramic bound together with slip by female artist Furui Akiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Sou Katachi (Following the shape) dating from 2017. It is built of hundreds of rolled sheafs of shaved clay covered in a white slip and fused together. The amount of work which goes into each sculpture is obvious, making her work great value. It is 12-1/2 inches (32 cm) long and in new condition.
Furui Akiko is yet one of our youngest rising stars, she was born in Aichi prefecture in 1987. She graduated the Aichi University of Education in 2010, and had her first pieces exhibited both in and out of Japan that same year. She has since been featured in a number of events both domestic and abroad. A rising star in the Sculptural Ceramics World, get her work while you can!.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1402329 (stock #1330)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Capricious sculpture like a colorful head towel removed yet retaining its shape by pioneering 20th century female artist Matsuda Yuriko signed on the base and enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kinrande Utsuwa. It is 9 x 7 x 5 1/2 Inches (22 x 17 x 14 cm) and in excellent condition.
Matsuda Yuriko was born in Ashiya, Hyōgō Prefecture in 1943nd lives and works in Oshino, Yamanashi Prefecture. Yuriko is an avid exhibitor; it is a wonder she has time to do any work at all. Both within Japan (Nihon Togei Ten, Gendai Togei Ten etc.) and without she has an impressive list of exhibitions in a host of countries. She received the Yagi Kazuo prize in 1986 among many others. According to the book “Touch Fire”, Many of the women artists included in this exhibition are independent innovators who work outside the constraints of Japanese ceramic traditions. However, several of the artists, including Matsuda Yuriko, continue to use traditional techniques with skills that rival, if not exceed, those of their predecessors, and in doing so they create new and challenging contemporary ceramic Sytg art. They reinterpret the traditional decorative technique for porcelain vessels, called iro-e over-glaze enameling, and transposes its motifs onto nonfunctional objects. Her beautifully enameled iro-e porcelain sculptures are witty odes to two favorite subjects: the female body and Mount Fuji. For more information on this artist and examples of her work see the books Contemporary Japanese Ceramics, Fired with Passion by Beatrice Chang and Samuel Lurie. Also see Contemporary Clay, Japanese Ceramics for the New Century based on the Museum of Fine Arts Boston exhibition or Soaring Voices, Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists (2010).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1402225 (stock #972)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Ash forms enigmatic shapes on this exquisite cocoon shaped wall vase by Yamada Jozan IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 8 cm (3 inches) diameter, 6 inches(16 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamada Jozan IV was born into the house of third generation Living National Treasure Yamada Minoru in 1954. He graduated the Tokoname High Ceramics Course in 1973, before entering Osaka University of art. Disappointed with the university scene he left to work under his father, creating a climbing kiln, whereupon he began working with various forms, not only the famous teapots forwhich his family was known, but also ash glazed ware such as this piece. He succeeded the family name of Jozan in 2006 upon the death of his father.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1401002 (stock #1317)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Pottery box by pioneering female artist Tsuboi Asuka made as a flowing roll of golden brocade inspired by traditional textiles enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 19 x 15 x 17 cm (7-1/2 x 6 x 6-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Tsuboi Asuka was born in Osaka in 1932, but the family moved to Tokyo when she was 12. She graduated the prestigious and progressive Jiyu Gakkuen (A progressive girls School established in 1921) then moved to Kyoto in 1953, Kyoto, the city she has called home for half a century, where she would spend a year at the Sentsuji Yusai Kobo before enlisting under Living National Treasure Tomimoto Kenkichi. Her first works were exhibited that year at the Shinshokogeikai (where she would be awarded in 1955). She worked to establish the Joryu Togei Ten Ceramic Exhibition for female artists in 1957, to allow women a venue to exhibit works in what was then a very male dominated field. In 1961 she was accepted into the Asahi Togeiten Ceramic Exhibition, and in 1966 would be selected to represent contemporary Japanese ceramics in China, the following year saw he take a study trip to Korea, and in 1970 to Thailand while her work was exhibited at the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, which would purchase her work in ’71 . She would be awarded at the Canadian International Ceramic Exhibition in 1973, and since her work has been exhibited throughout the globe. Here work to promote the arts was recognized in 1988 with the Kyoto Prefectural Order of Arts and Culture Award, and in 1991 with the Kyoto city Order of Cultural Merit, and again in 1992 with the prefectural Order of Cultural Merit. All culminated in her receiving the Japan Ceramic Society Gold prize, perhaps the most important award allowed a potter, in 2004. Her work can be found in Museum collections including several works in both the Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo and Kyoto, Fukui and Wakayama Prefectural Museums of Art, Suntory Museum, Shiga Togei No Mori Museum, Ariana Museum, Yale University Museum and The International Ceramics Museum in Faenza. According to the book Touch Fire: Tsuboi Asuka's influence on the ceramic arts of Japan cannot be overstated. As one of the first women to aggressively challenge the male hierarchy, she forged a role for women ceramic artists that previously did not exist in Japan. Tsuboi was the charismatic leader of the influential Kyoto women's ceramic group Joryū Tōgei (Women's Association of Ceramic Art) when it was first formed in 1957. This group was pivotal not only in providing a platform for women to participate as artists in their own right, but in giving them the opportunity to present their challenging work to the public.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Pre 2000 item #1400891 (stock #1315)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exceptional work by Kondo Takahiro, three sided decorated with concentric squares triangles and circles in rushing fields of blue wrpped in a yellow cloth pouch and enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Jikku tsubo. It is 59 cm (2 feet) tall and in excellent condition enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Created in 1994 it was exhibited at Takashimaya Department Store Gallery that same year in the exhibition "Blue Time 1200". It is also published in the book Kondo Takahiro Time and Space '91-99, Vase Raisonne. A copy of the book is included.
Kondo Takahiro (b. 1958) was born the grandson of Living National Treasure Kondo Yuzo. However, he graduated Hosei University not with a degree in sculpture or crafts, but in Literature. From there he studied at the Kyoto Prefectural Technical Institute of Ceramics, followed by a year at the Kyoto Municipal Institute of Industrial Research. 15 years later he would spend a year in Edinburgh studying glass making, and with this combination of skills, was born the silver mist series for which he is so highly acclaimed. Work by him is held in Museums throughout the world, including the National Museum of Scotland, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Museum of Arts & Design, New York, Spencer Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Art Gallery NSW, Sydney, Hamilton Art Gallery, Australia, Miho Museum. National Gallery of Victoria, Paramita Museum, The Museum of Contemporary Ceramic Art, Shigaraki, and The São Paulo Museum of Art, Brazil among others. Without a doubt one of the most important contemporary artists in Japan today. For more see Celestial Ceramics: the Art of Kondo Takahiro (2002)
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1400660 (stock #1312)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Two lug handles leap from the sides of this traditional form by Karatsu Legend Nakagawa Jinenbo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chossen Karatsu Mimitsuki Hanaire. Mottled glaze covers the rough clay darkened by flame with flashes of white and blue and crispy chunks of ash and debris clinging to the sides. It is a work which embodies the best of this highly sought artist. The vessel is 9 inches (23 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Nakagawa Jinenbo (1953-2011) was always fascinated with Karatsu ware, and studied under the great Inoue Toya from the age of 24. Several years later he returned to his hometown to establish a climbing kiln of his own, which he put to great use. From there, not satisfied with his own skills, he went to Tanaka Sajiro for an additional apprenticeship. Afterwards, as many Chajin artists, he concentrated on private exhibitions as an outlet for his work, shunning the world of mass competition and retail. His life and career were cut short far too early, making his work both highly valued and hard to find.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1400297 (stock #1307)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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It is a privilege to introduce this incredible sculpture by the young female ceramicist Furui Akiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tsubomi (bud) dating from 2017. It is made up of hundreds of rolled sheafs of shaved clay covered in a white slip and fused together. The amount of work which goes into each sculpture is obvious, making her work great value.
Furui Akiko was born in Aichi prefecture in 1987. She graduated the Aichi University of Education in 2010, and had her first pieces exhibited both in and out of Japan that same year. She has since been featured in a number of events both domestic and abroad. A rising star in the Sculptural Ceramics World, she is, along with Shingu Sayaka and Tanaka Tomomi, an artist with a strong following and a distinct style all her own.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1980 item #1399710 (stock #1305)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A menagerie of 12 comic creatures grin back at us as we pour another cup of sake from this Tokkuri decorated by world renowned woodblock artist and painter Clifton Karhu enclosed in the original wooden box also decorated on all facets with the same humorous creatures as well as a self portrait on the lid captioned EVERY DAY IS A GOOD DAY. It is 17.5 cm (7 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Clifton Karhu (1927-2007) had his first introduction to Japanese living stationed in Sasebo during the occupation from 1946 to 1948, and returned not long after graduating the Minneapolis Art University to spend many years as a missionary before he took up art as his modicum. Although he had participated in painting exhibitions, it was after his move to Kyoto in 1963 that he began working with woodblocks, for which he is most remembered. There he would remain, for nearly half a century, creating some of the most quintessential and recognizable prints of the 20th century.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1395357 (stock #1296)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A selection of three sake cups by Tanoue Shinya encapsulating the various characters fo this artists work. Each comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box. 700 dollars for all three or:
a) White W2.5(7cm) H2(5cm) 250.00
b) Blue W3.5(9cm) H2(5cm) 300.00
c) White W3(8cm) H1.5(4cm) 250.00
Tanoue Shinya was born in Kyoto, the cultural heartland of Japan in 1976. He garnered a BA from Doshisha University in Theology, and after two years in a textile company, an Associate in Fine Arts from Saga Art College in 2003. He has a list of private and group exhibitions very impressive for his age, including the Mino Ceramic Park International Ceramic exhibition (awarded 2005), Asahi Modern Craft Exhibition, Design in Ceramic Vessel Exhibition in Aichi, Nihon Togeiten National Ceramic Exhibition, (Awarded 2007) and Asahi Ceramic Exhibition, (Awarded 2007). Gendai Togeiten National Modern Ceramics Exhibition. His work has been exhibited in the United States, France, Germany, Hong Kong Italy and many others. His work is held in the collections of The Museum of Kyoto, The Museum of Ceramic Art in Hyogo, INAX Tile Museum, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Tweed Museum of Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1394282 (stock #1293)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Tenmoku Hanging vase by the living master of that genre, Kimura Morikazu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tetsuyu Kohen Kake-hana-ike. The lozenge form features two lug handles in the shape of a traditional Waniguchi Japanese Shrine Gong. It is 7-1/2 x 6-1/2 x 2 inches (19 x 16.5 x 5.5 cm) nd in excellent condition, retaining the original shiori and wrapping cloth.
Kimura Morikazu was born to the house of a Kyo-yaki potter and studied under Ishiguro Munemaru, He established his first kiln in the Gojo Zaka area of Kyoto in 1947, moving to Fukui in 1976. He is held in the collection of both the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art and the Imperial Household Agency. He has been displayed at innumerable private exhibitions in addition to major exhibitions such as the Nitten, Nihon Dento Kogeiten(National Traditional Crafts Exhibition) and Nihon Togei Ten (National Ceramics Exhibition) among others. Winner of the Japan Ceramics Society (JCS) award, purchased by the Ministry of Foreign affairs. Morikazu has been incredibly influential on the subsequent generation of potters.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1394045 (stock #1289)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Elegant imagery in rusty orange decorates the yellow body of this small vase by important artist and Living National Treasure Tokuda Yasokichi I enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 4-1/2 inches (11 cm) tall and in excellent condition. A very difficult artist to find, this is a rare opportunity.
Tokuda Yasokichi I (1873 –1956)was born into a family of textile dyers in Ishikawa prefecture, but entered the ceramics world under the tutelage of his Brother Matsumoto Sahei, specializing in the Yoshidaya decorative technique of Kutani ware in 1890. In 1922 he received Imperial patronage. He was named one of the first living National Treasures in 1953 (and his grandson, Yasokichi III would also be named such).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1393414 (stock #1282)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A signature work in gold Shino by Suzuki Tomio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yohen Kin Shino Hachi (Shimmering Altered Gold Shino Bowl). It is 10-1/2 inches (27 cm) diameter, 5 inches (13 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Suzuki Tomio was born in 1948 in Yawata, Kyoto, and has spent his life in the perfection of Shino glazing. He did not move for independence until establishing his own kiln at the age of 40. One of his most notable advances in Shino glazing is the development of Yohen-kin or transformed gold Shino. First introduced in 2003, this type of shino is an opulent, golden glaze and has come to serve as the predecessor for a number of lustrous glazes in the artist's growing body of shino work. In 2011, his work was acquired by the Philadelphia Museum of Art for display in their East Asian Art collection and in 2012 by the University of Durham's Oriental Museum in the United Kingdom. He holds regular exhibitions across Japan at major department store galleries, including Takashimaya, Hanshin, and Mitsukoshi.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1393159 (stock #1279)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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The elegance of these works by Fukami has created a stir in the collecting world which has not abated over the last 25 years. Offered here a rare wing (or blade as some describe them) object by world renowned Fukami Sueharu dating circa 2006 enclosed in the original wooden box titled “Tenku”, signed and stamped by the artist. It is mounted on a wooden base, and comes with an artist designed metal stand (all fit in the box). The sculpture is 13 inches (33 cm) long and is in perfect condition.
Fukami Sueharu is synonymous with seihakuji celadon. He has been displayed numerous times at the prestigious Nitten, Nihon Togei Ten (National Japanese Ceramic Exhibition) and Nihon Gendai Kogei Ten (National Japanese Modern Crafts Exhibition) among others. He is held in the Yale University Museum among others. For more information on this artist a quick web-search, or a look at the article highlighting his life in the March 2005 edition of Orientations Magazine will be enlightening. The list of museums holding his work is, in fact, much to long for this page, but includes the National Museums of Modern Art, Tokyo /Kyoto / and Osaka, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Philadelphia St. Louis, Portland, Chicago, Minneapolis, Smithsonian, British Museum, Victoria & Albert Museum, Musée national de céramique, Sèvres, Musée des arts décoratifs, Paris, Hetjens Museum, Düsseldorf and the National Gallery of Australia among many others
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1390042 (stock #1274)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A shell shaped swirling form by young female artist Takatsu Mio enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 6-1/2 inches (16.5cm)wide, roughly 7 inches (18cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Takatsu Mio (b. 1976) was raised in Gifu prefecture among the scattered kilns of Mino. She graduated the Osaka University of Arts Sculpture Department in 1999, moving on to advanced studies which she completed in 2001. Her first exhibited works were in 1999, and then again in Tokyo in 2001. The following year she exhibited with the 6th International Ceramics Exhibition in Mino with several private exhibitions over the following years in some of Japans top venues. In 2005 she made her overseas debut. In 2009 her work was featured in Women Ceramic Artists in the 21st Century (Paramita Museum/Mie Japan) 2011 saw her work accepted into the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition in Italy, as well as the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1389239 (stock #1266)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Wow! Is what comes to mind the first time you see this daring silver glazed organic Kake Hana-ire by Okumura Hiromi. The clay folds about onto itself, forming a seed-like pod, with an opening in the top and wings extending out both sides. A wire loop is affixed to the back for wall hanging. A signed and stamped wooden plackard by the artist accompanies the piece. It is 11 x 14 x 5 inches (28 x 36 x 13 cm) and is in fine condition.
Okumura was born in Kyoto in 1953, and was thus from an early age inducted into the avant-garde world of pottery being created at that time by the founders of Sodeisha and their influence. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal University of Art Ceramic division in 1978. Throughout the 80s a slew of public and private exhibitions led him to an appointment as professor of Ceramics at Kyoto Seika University. He received Grand Prize at the Kyoten in 1990, and has since received other awards there. His work was selected for the traveling exhibition showcasing young Japanese talent “Japanese Pottery: The Rising Generation from Traditional Japanese Kilns”. He has been exhibited frequently in America as well.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1388754 (stock #1261)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An otherworldly form from the age of Sputnick by important artist Morino Taimei exhibited at the 1959 Nitten National Art Exhibition and published in the Nittenshi (vol. 22). It is signed in romanized characters H. Morino (His given name is Hiroaki). It is roughly 12 inches (30 cm) tall, 15 inches (38 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Morino Taimei was born in Kyoto in 1934, and was first accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition at a relatively young age in 1957 (a year before graduating the Kyoto Municipal University of Fine Art!). In 1960 he received the prestigious Hokutosho prize at the same National Exhibition. In the early 60s he worked as a guest professor at the University of Chicago. Upon his return to Japan his career began to lift off with a second Hokutosho Prize at the Nitten, followed by The governors prize and others at the Gendai Kogei Ten (Modern National Crafts Exhibition). He was subsequently selected for display at the Kyoto and Tokyo National Museums in 1972 and was accepted into the first Nihon Togei Ten that same year. Since his list of exhibitions and prizes has continued to grow, with subsequent selections in the Tokyo and Kyoto museums of Art, as well as exhibitions in Paris, Italy, America, Canada, Denmark and others. In 2007 he received the Japan Art Academy Prize, an award to a work of art similar in weight to the bestowing of Living National Treasure to an artist. This puts the artist in a small club, rare and important. For more information on the artist see Contemporary Japanese Ceramics, Fired with Passion by (Lurie/Chan, 2006) or the recent exhibition of works titled Generosity in Clay from the Natalie Fitzgerald Collection.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1970 item #1388308 (stock #1048)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A set of five yunomi by Suzuki Osamu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kao no Aru Yunomi. Each cup has a small face on one side, pale glaze covering all but that smiling fellow and the foote. Each cup is 3 inches (8 cm) tall and in fine condition.
Osamu was, along with Kumakura Junkichi, Hikaru Yamada and Yagi Kazuo, one of the founding members of the influential Sodeisha (Crawling Through Mud Association), a group of revolutionary post war ceramic artists whose influence remains strong today. Works by him are in too many collections to note in this small add, including the Kyoto and Tokyo National Museums of Modern Art, Victoria Albert and New York Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Contemporary item #1385617 (stock #1249)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite Venetian glass vase by Yasuda Taizo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Lace pattern vase. A web of hair thin qhite is woven into the clear glass hemmed by bars of gold. It is 16.5 x 7 x 17 cm (6-1/2 x 2-3/4 x 6-3/4 inches). Yasuda Taizo was born in Hyogo prefecture in 1972. He studied Glass making at the Toyama Prefectural Glass Research Facility, graduating there in 1994, and continued working in Toyama until 1997, when he established his own studio. However it was immediately after graduating that he first began to receive acclaim, iwith a prize in 1995 at the Toyama City Art Fair prize. He would continue showing there, as well as the Toyama Prefectural Exhibition, Takaoka Craft Fair, Modern Glass Exhibition in Satsuma, Nihon Dento Kogeiten Traditional Crafts exhibition, and was also awarded at the first Toyama International Glass Exhibition in 2008.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Contemporary item #1383843 (stock #1246)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Tiger stripes of crackled gold over veins of red, yellow and green on black by Kobayashi Mitsugi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taste of an Autum Day. It is 12-1/2 inches (32 cm) tall, 8 x 9 inches (20. X 23 cm) round and in excellent condition.
Kobayashi Mitsugi, born in Aichi prefecture in 1932, and graduated the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts. He was awarded at the Nihon Gendai Kogei Ten (Japan Contemporary Arts and Crafts Exhibition) in 1973 Kogeisho-Prize and 1980 Governor of Tokyo Prize as well as the Tokusen-Prize at the Nitten National Exhibition in 1993. He has been exhibited widely in Japan as well as Germany, France, New York and Budapest among others. His works were featured in the 1978 “Modern Japan Craft”, at The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. The 1982 “World Glass Now ’82” at the Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, the 1991 “Biennale Internationale Du Verre D'Art Contemporain”, France where he received the Gold Prize culminating in a 2005 Solo Exhibition at the Paramita Museum, Mie. He is held in the Kanagawa Prefectural Gallery, Museo Municipal de Arte en Vidrio (Madrid), Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, and Paramita among others.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Pre 2000 item #1383368 (stock #1241)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A lidded bottle of hand blown blue glass with a white stripe swirling up to a ball-lilke bung of clear with a white center by Nakashima Yasushi It is 7 inches (18 cm) tall plus the lid, and in excellent condition. Perfect for chilled summer sake, signed on the base Y. Nakashima.
Nakashima Yasushi (1938-2017) was born in Hyogo prefecture and graduated the Kyoto Municipal University of Art in 1962. While still at university he was accepted into the Mainichi Kogyo Design exhibition. He began his career as a designer for Hino Automotive, in charge of their top model the Contessa. However dissatisfied with the opportunities there he moved to Nisshin Denki where he headed up the lighting design department. He left Nisshin in 1974, and began his own career as an independent artist, focused on the plastic arts of glass and ceramic while maintaining his contacts in the design world. With his past in lighting, he was innovative in creating works which combined glass, pottery, metal and electric lights. This did not deter him from consulting in other areas of design, and he was awarded at the National Catalog and Poster Exhibition in 1978. Although he would remain unaffiliated, a difficult place to be in group conscious Japan, he would be accepted into many of the National exhibitions including the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition and awarded at a number of important events, including the National Craft Exhibition, National Modern Ceramic Sculpture Exhibition (and the Shigaraki Ceramics Exhibition in 1999. One monumental work stands in the park in Toki City, Gifu prefecture. He is held in the collections of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and Ringling Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Contemporary item #1383254 (stock #1238)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A drinking set covered in gold foil and Rimpa inspired florals by Kuroki Kuniaki enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tebuki Glass Shuki and named inside Kinasi Korin. There are two cups, a Tokkuri sake flask, and two chopstick holders, one saphire the other ruby. The Tokkuri pot is 5 inches (12.5 cm) tall and all is in excellent condition. Kuroki Kuniaki was born in Miyazaki prefecture in 1945. He began his career employed straight out of school by the Yamaya Glass Company in 1963. It would only be a decade later that he would venture out on his own, to begin creating unique works of glass art. Yet another ten years would pass before he went fully independent in 1984. He began with a project to revitalize Edo style Cut glass (Satsuma Kiriko), and established his workshop in 1989. He was awarded the National Order of Excellence for modern craft in 1991 and began to garner attention overseas. He was awarded in Paris in 1995, Rome in 1996 and Athens in 1997. Since he has been exhibited widely throughout Japan, as well as the US, Singapore, Throughout Europe, Taiwan, Australia among many others. His works have been collected by the Imperial Household Agency and the Royal Family. They are held in the collection of Philadelphia, Denmark Glass Museum, Peking Palace Museum and Kitazawa Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Contemporary item #1383253 (stock #1237)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Scales of color overlap in the crystal basin of this oblong form by Kobayashi Mitsugi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mosaic Mon Sara (mosaic pattern dish). It is 8 x 6-1/2 x 1-1/2 inches (21 x 16.5 x 3.5 cm) and in excellent condition.
Kobayashi Mitsugi, born in Aichi prefecture in 1932, and graduated the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts. He was awarded at the Nihon Gendai Kogei Ten (Japan Contemporary Arts and Crafts Exhibition) in 1973 Kogeisho-Prize and 1980 Governor of Tokyo Prize as well as the Tokusen-Prize at the Nitten National Exhibition in 1993. He has been exhibited widely in Japan as well as Germany, France, New York and Budapest among others. His works were featured in the 1978 “Modern Japan Craft”, at The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. The 1982 “World Glass Now ’82” at the Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, the 1991 “Biennale Internationale Du Verre D'Art Contemporain”, France where he received the Gold Prize culminating in a 2005 Solo Exhibition at the Paramita Museum, Mie. He is held in the Kanagawa Prefectural Gallery, Museo Municipal de Arte en Vidrio (Madrid), Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, and Paramita among others.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Contemporary item #1383219 (stock #1236)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A pool of green and gold veined with black and spotted with white on a morphic form by Kobayashi Mitsugi enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 8 x 6 inches (20 x 15 x 4 cm) and in excellent condition. Kobayashi Mitsugi, born in Aichi, graduated the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts. He was awarded at the Nihon Gendai Kogei Ten (Japan Contemporary Arts and Crafts Exhibition) 1973 Kogeisho-Prize and 1980 Governor of Tokyo Prize as well as the Tokusen-Prize at the Nitten National Exhibition in 1993. He has been exhibited widely in Japan as well as Germany, France, New York and Budapest among others. He is held in the Kanagawa Prefectural Gallery, Museo Municipal de Arte en Vidrio (Madrid), Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, and Paramita among others.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Pre 2000 item #1383214 (stock #1235)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Crimson petals seem to swirl about a vortex of yellow fading to white on the overall black glass surface of this plate by Nakashima Yasushi enclosed in the original signed wooden box and exhibited at the 19th Nihon Dento Kogeiten exhibition (catalog included). It is 14 x 16 inches (35.5 x 41.5 cm) and is in excellent condition. It is titled Anba Unmo Nami-Uchi Sara, Roran no Hana. (I believe he is using the first two characters as “ateji” meaning Amber Mica Waved Dish, Orchid Flowers).
Nakashima Yasushi (1938-2017) was born in Hyogo prefecture and graduated the Kyoto Municipal University of Art in 1962. While still at university he was accepted into the Mainichi Kogyo Design exhibition. He began his career as a designer for Hino Automotive, in charge of their top model the Contessa. However dissatisfied with the opportunities there he moved to Nisshin Denki where he headed up the lighting design department. He left Nisshin in 1974, and began his own career as an independent artist, focused on the plastic arts of glass and ceramic while maintaining his contacts in the design world. With his past in lighting, he was innovative in creating works which combined glass, pottery, metal and electric lights. This did not deter him from consulting in other areas of design, and he was awarded at the National Catalog and Poster Exhibition in 1978. Although he would remain unaffiliated, a difficult place to be in group conscious Japan, he would be accepted into many of the National exhibitions including the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition and awarded at a number of important events, including the National Craft Exhibition, National Modern Ceramic Sculpture Exhibition (and the Shigaraki Ceramics Exhibition in 1999. One monumental work stands in the park in Toki City, Gifu prefecture. He is held in the collections of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and Ringling Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Jars : Contemporary item #1382030 (stock #1234)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite lidded ginger jar wrapped with a writhing dragon by Ibata Katsue. The artist mark is placed in a raised cartouche, like an old wax seal, on the side, and the dragons seem to reach for it like it was the pearl of Buddhist wisdom. It is roughly 8 inches (19.5 cm) tall and in excellent condition. This piece is from a private collection of modern art and was purchased from the artist. There is no box.
Ibata Katsue was born in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, in 1958. She graduated the Nara College of Fine Arts in 1977, and apart from a brief period of teaching in Canada, she has always lived and worked Japan. She began working in Tokoname in 1985, then moved to Shizuoka in 1990. In 1991 she held a solo exhibition at the important Kuroda Toen Gallery in Shibuya, Tokyo (again in 2017) and was one of the demonstrators at the International Ceramics Festival in Aberystwyth. She ‘performed’ her pottery demonstration dressed in a cat suit and dancing to reggae music as if to negate any association with traditional Japanese pottery which has been so influential among British potters.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1381017 (stock #826)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular faceted work by Ueda Mitsuharu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Mentori Kabin. It is 9 x 11 x 11 inches (28 x 24 x 28 cm) and is in excellent condition.
Born in Fukuoka in 1957, and studied initially pottery in Tamba under Ogami Tsuyoshi before entering the Kyoto Prefectural Ceramic Research Facility, which he finished in 1983 followed by a year studying glazes in the Shiga Prefectural Kiln. That same year he entered the Koga Tea Culture Research place (Koga Sado Bunka Kenkyusho) and came under the influence of Koga Kenzo. In 1987 he came to study under Ueda Naokata, and has since taken over that kiln, becoming the 6th Naokata.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1381011 (stock #1232)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Yuteki Tenmoku chawan in sumtous colors, dark blues within, midnight drizzling to sunrise pinks and sunset oranges on the side by Kimura Moriyasu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 4-1/2 inches (11.5 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kimura Moriyasu (b. 1935) studied pottery initially at the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (which turned out such masters as Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro) and then under his brother Kimura Morikazu. He is well known for his use of crawling and oil spot glazes. He exhibits with the Gendai Nihon Togeiten and Nihon Dento Kogeiten among others. He has been awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Order of Cultural Merit (2004). Work by him is held in the Britush Museum, Boston Museum, Dallas Museum and Ise Shrine among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1381010 (stock #419)
Scraped cut and beat out of form with looping ribbons of clay for handles, here is a mizusashi which certainly does not let down; everything we have come to expect from this popular Japanese artist enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is heavily potted, creating a bold, lively experience. The piece is 8 inches (21 cm) tall, 7 inches (18 cm) diameter and in perfect condition.
This artist has been working with clay since the 1950s, devouring styles along the way. Seto, Oribe, Iga and Celadon, all very different approaches which he masters one at a time, extending his unique view of the arts to new realms, and moving on to the next challenge when his appetite and personal genius has been satiated. He was exhibited and prized at the National Japanese Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten), National Ceramics Exhibition (Nihon Togei Ten), Chunichi International Ceramics Exhibition (Chunichi Kokusai Togei Ten) and Asahi Togei Ten among others, and is held in several important international collections.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1380934 (stock #1230)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A squat form quintessentially Kishi Eiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box dated 1997. Purchased from the artist, it is 21 x 14 x 19.5 cm (8-1/4 x 5-1/2 x 7-3/4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kishi Eiko was born in Nara in 1948, and largely trained in the Ceramic Institute of Tekisui Museum. She was first exhibited in 1981 at the Women’s Association of Ceramic Art and was awarded that year. She took the grand prize at the 1985 Asahi Ceramic Art Exhibition, and from then her list of exhibitions both within Japan and out is extensive, with works in any number of important public and private collections including the V&A and Museum of Fine Arts Boston. For more on this artist see Soaring Voices (2007) or Touch Fire (2009) or New Forms, New Voices (2017)
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Contemporary item #1380929 (stock #1226)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Enigmatic designs in free flowing black and rigid lines impinge on the yellow square of this raised plate by Kim Hono. It is 24 x 25 x 4 cm (9-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 1-1/2 inches), signed underneath. This piece is from a private collection of modern art and was purchased from the artist. There is no box but one could be had for an additional fee.
Kim Hono was born in Seto City Aichi Prefecture in 1958, and graduated the Prefectural Ceramics School in 1977, then taking up apprenticeship at a local kiln before establishing himself as an independent artist in 1982. He held his first solo exhibition in Nagoya in 1985. He has been exhibited at the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition Dento Kogeiten National Traditiaonal Crafts Exhibition, Asahi Togeiten Exhibition, Chunichi Kokusai Togeiten, and his works being shown in some of Japans top galleries including Kuroda Toen in Tokyo’s Ginza ward. Not to be defined, even by himself, famously when asked by Hohnoho Magazine to define his work he cryptically replied only Kaze wo Kanjiru Koto (Feeling the wind).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1380005 (stock #1224)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A very rare early sculpture by Imaizumi Masato (now Living National Treasure Imaizumi Imaemon XIV) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shizen to no Kakawari Kata (In Relation to Nature) Plate III. Paper thin shards are embedded in the un-glazed disc of raw white Kaolin clay, a powerful expression indeed on our relationship with the natural world. It is 11 inches diameter and in excellent condition.
Imaizumi Masato succeeded as Imaemon XIV in 2002, heir to a century’s long tradition of working in porcelain. However he studied initially sculpture at Musashino Art University and trained with Suzuki Osamu of Sodeisha fame, and thus has a firm background in the avant garde. Since inheriting the family name he has concentrated on both traditional techniques of Iro-Nabeshima, while exploring new techniques using ink’s feature of repelling pigment and disappearing after firing. In 2009, he was granted the Medal with Purple Ribbon from the Emperor. In 2014, he received the ultimate distinction as the youngest artist in Japan ever to be designated a Living National Treasure.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1378500 (stock #1220)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular Shino Vase in deep murasaki and white by Tamaoki Yasuo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shino Henko. It is 14-3/4 inches (39 cm) tall, roughly 7-1/4 inches (18.5 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Tamaoki Yasuo was born in Tajimi in 1941, one of the homes of Mino ware. He began his path to professional ceramicist at the Tajimi Industrial High School, and a stint at the Gifu Ceramics Research institute, where he followed the footsteps of a number of modern ceramic artists such as Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro, who also began their careers in the same manner. He then apprenticed under Kato Kohei before establishing his own kiln. Since, his list of exhibitions and awards is too long to print, but include the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition), Best of Show twice at the Tokai Dento Kogei Ten (Tokai Traditional Arts and Crafts Exhibition), as well as being prized at the Asahi Togei Ten (Asahi Ceramics Exhibition), and receiving the prestigious Japan Ceramics Society Award. In 1991 he was named an intangible cultural asset of Tajimi city
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 2000 item #1378184 (stock #1216)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular large basin covered in fissured green with tinges of red by Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji O-zara. It is 16-1/4 inches (42 cm) diameter, 4 inches (10 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Due to size the cost of shipping will be accrued separately
Shimizu Uichi (1926-2004) was born in Kyoto the son of a ceramic dealer. Discarding the family business he apprenticed in plastic arts under Ishiguro Munemaro. His work retains some principal elements of his teacher’s style while incorporating an understated elegance and avant-garde spirit of challenge uncommon for his time. He was first exhibited at the Nitten in 1951, receiving numerous awards there since. He also took the gold medal at the Prague International Exhibition, and was at the Brussels World Exposition. He is in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum, Kyoto Museum of Modern art and the Freer Gallery among others. In 1985 he was named a Juyo Mukei Bunkazai (col. Living National Treasure) for his work in Tetsu-yu iron glaze. But this did not stop him continuing to research into uncommon ground, and he strove, like an artist as opposed to a craftsman, to constantly innovate and evolve to the day he died.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1980 item #1378038 (stock #1215)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Bursting with life, this vessel by avant-garde Shinkai Kanzan was exhibited at the Nitten National Art Exhibition in 1982. Titled Kitsune to Minori no Monogatari, Kabin (Vase, The Tale of Fox and Fruition), the sly creature slinks through fruit laden vines in a path of dark through the light gray glaze covering the simple open form. It comes enclosed in the original signed wooden. It is quite large, measuring 30 cm (12 inches) diameter, roughly the same height and is in excellent condition.
Shinkai Kanzan was born the grandson of Seifu Yohei III in 1912 and was raised from a baby in the confines of the Gojo-zaka ceramic district of Kyoto, inducted daily into the realm of pottery by his father and grandfather. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, and moved on to study painting (after his fathers urging) before returning to ceramics under Kiyomizu Rokubei V and Vi. He was first accepted into the Teiten (later Nitten) National Exhibition in 1930, and was displayed there consistently thereafter as well as others, being prized at the 1939 San Francisco Exposition. Just as he was beginning to take off as an artist, he was drafted and sent to China, where after he spent three years in a Russian Gulag in Siberia. Upon his return to Japan, he branched out on his own; with a unique vision grounded in the roots of the training and instruction he had received before the war, but with a new style and concept to differentiate himself from his peers. In 1951 he was recognized with the Gold Award at the Japanese Art Expo. Following many prizes, in 1974 he was granted the Governors prize at the Nitten, and in 1980 the Nihon Geijutsu-in Sho (Japanese Art Academy prize). In 1989 he was awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Cultural Order of Merit for his life-long endeavors. Works by him are held in the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1980 item #1378037 (stock #1214)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Every shade between mustard and aubergine fades into the deepest blue on the sides of this ovoid form decorated with enigmatic relief-work by Shinkai Kanzan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Nishiki-ka Kabin. It is 14-1/2 inches (37 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Shinkai Kanzan was born the grandson of Seifu Yohei III in 1912 and was raised from a baby in the confines of the Gojo-zaka ceramic district of Kyoto, inducted daily into the realm of pottery by his father and grandfather. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, and moved on to study painting (after his father’s urging) before returning to ceramics under Kiyomizu Rokubei V and Vi. He was first accepted into the Teiten (later Nitten) National Exhibition in 1930, and was displayed there consistently thereafter as well as others, being prized at the 1939 San Francisco Exposition. Just as he was beginning to take off as an artist, he was drafted and sent to China, where after he spent three years in a Russian Gulag in Siberia. Upon his return to Japan, he branched out on his own; with a unique vision grounded in the roots of the training and instruction he had received before the war, but with a new style and concept to differentiate himself from his peers. In 1951 he was recognized with the Gold Award at the Japanese Art Expo. Following many prizes, in 1974 he was granted the Governors prize at the Nitten, and in 1980 the Nihon Geijutsu-in Sho (Japanese Art Academy prize). In 1989 he was awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Cultural Order of Merit for his life-long endeavors. Works by him are held in the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Contemporary item #1377672 (stock #1210)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An urban landscape split by a drooping plane by Kiyomizu Masahiro (Rokubei VIII). It is 19-1/2 x 11-1/2 x 11 inches (49.5 x 29 x 28 cm). Firing flaws in the corners of the towers accent the work, the degradation of from a characteristic of the artists work, often purposefully introduced to create tension. Although the first heads of the Kiyomizu family concentrated on traditional, popular objects and designs, Rokubei VII and VIII "took a radical turn" to produce abstract, geometric three-dimensional pieces which are either purely decorative, or combine function with distinctive, unexpected form. His works have been described as "futuristic-looking" and as having "a very Cubist sensibility.
This comes from the Kiyomizu Family estate, there is no box.
Kiyomizu Masahiro was born in Kyoto in 1954son of the sculptor and future 7th head of the Kiyomizu family Kyūbei (at that time known as Hiroshi). Masahiro graduated with a degree in Architecture from the prestigious Waseda University in 1979. Returning to Kyoto he would spend a year at the Kyoto Prefectural Ceramic Training Institute and another year at the Municipal Decorative Arts Institute in Kyoto before beginning at the family kiln where he would be handed the reins upon his father’s retirement in 2000. A technique he favors is joining together flat slabs of clay in extended forms, highlighting instead of hiding the process of their construction. He then makes cuts to weaken the structure, which results in distortions during firing. He has received numerous awards, including the Grand Prize at the Asahi Ceramics Exhibition in 1983 and 1986, Governors award at the Chunichi International Exhibition of Ceramic Arts (Chunichi Kokusai Togei ten), Kyoto Prefectural Culture Award in 1993 and 2009 and the JCS award in 2005. His work is held in the collections of the British Museum, National Art Museum of China, National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo, National Museum of Art in Osaka and Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1970 item #1377354 (stock #1208)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A rare late 1950s to '60s sculptural work by Kitade Fujio, an artist credited with bringing Kutani into the modern age, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hekimen Ni Seshite Okizaru Kaki (Vase left abandoned by the wall). The clay is quite pure, covered in blasts of black and beige. It is 9-1/4 x 5-1/2 x 11 inches (24 x 14 x 28 cm) and in excellent condition. Kitade Fujio was born in 1919 the first son of potter Kitade Tojiro. He graduated the Ceramics research facility in 1937, but coming of age during the war years was, of course, disruptive, and he did not complete his courses at the Kanazawa University of Art until 1950, the same year he was first accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition. In 1955 he received top prize at the Ishikawa prefectural Art Exhibition, and about this time would change his name from Fujio (two characters) to Fujio (three characters, as is the signature on this box). He would subsequently be accepted into and awarded at the National Modern Crafts Exhibition and Asahi Ceramics Exhibition; He would garner the Hokutosho prize at the Nitten in 1965 and would later serve as a judge there as well as at the Chunichi International Ceramics Exhibition, The Gendai Kogeiten Craft Exhibition and at the Asahi Ceramics exhibition. He was awarded consecutively at the 1st through 3rd Traditional Kutani Craft Exhibitions. In 1979 he would be granted a professorship at the Kanazawa University of Art. From that time he would divide his time between teaching and working with clay, garnering many more awards. In 1983 he would be commissioned by the Emperor to make a Tsubo, and the following year would be honored with the Kaga Cultural Award. 1990 he would become principal of the Art University. In 2010 he would receive special accolades from the Japan Ceramic Society for his life’s work. Work by him is held in the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa and the Kutani Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1377253 (stock #1207)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A rare sculptural basin by Kiyomizu Kyubei dating from the late 1950s signed on the base Yo. Very heavy, it is 11 x 8 x 9 inches (28 x 20 x 23.5 cm) and is in excellent condition. This came from the Rokubei family estate. No box. Early works by Kyubei are rare because, according to the catalog: Yagi Kazuo to Kiyomizu Rokubei (exhibited at the Muse Tomo in Tokyo, 2017) “he changed names several times and is said to have destroyed the works he produced in those days. Judging from the ceramic works that remain and his achievements, his activities during the 1950s are significant.”
Kiyomizu Kyubei (1922-2006) was born Tsukamoto Hiroshi in Nagoya. He graduated from Nagoya Industrial High School (now the Nagoya Institute of Technology), majoring in architecture. Coming of age during the war years was not easy. he worked in glass and metal before being adopted into the Kiyomizu family in 1951. In 1953 he graduated from the Tokyo University of the Arts, majoring in metal casting. In 1958 he continued his studies of sculpture under under Shigeru Senno, while working in clay at the Rokubei kiln. In 1963 he became an assistant professor at the Kyoto City University of Arts, advancing to full professor in 1968. He then took a one year sabbatical in Italy and since has received many prizes including the 17th Mainichi Arts Award in 1976 and the Excellence Award at the Henry Moore Grand Prize Exhibition in 1979. He succeeded as head of the Kiyomizu Family in 1980, relinquishing the reins to his son Masahiro in 2000. According to the catalog from the recent Kyubei/Kazuo exhibtion “The works by Kiyomizu Hiroshi dating from the 1950s display handsome, geometric forms. Design like consideration is a sensibility shared by many ceramicists today and he gives us an impression that he was ahead of his time.
The National Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka hold 16 works
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1377139 (stock #1205)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Two shades of black form ethnic patterns on this hishigata vessel by Kiyomizu Rokubei dating circa 1960 nearly identical to figure 12 (page 85) of the catalog Yagi Kazuo to Kiyomizu Rokubei exhibited at the Muse Tomo in Tokyo in 2017. It is 18 x 13 x 24.5 cm (roughly 7 x 5 x 10 inches) and is in excellent condition. This came from the Rokubei family estate. No box
Kiyomizu Kyubei (1922-2006) was born Tsukamoto Hiroshi in Nagoya. He graduated from Nagoya Industrial High School (now the Nagoya Institute of Technology), majoring in architecture. Coming of age during the war years was not easy. he worked in glass and metal before being adopted into the Kiyomizu family in 1951. In 1953 he graduated from the Tokyo University of the Arts, majoring in metal casting. In 1958 he continued his studies of sculpture under under Shigeru Senno, while working in clay at the Rokubei kiln. In 1963 he became an assistant professor at the Kyoto City University of Arts, advancing to full professor in 1968. He then took a one year sabbatical in Italy and since has received many prizes including the 17th Mainichi Arts Award in 1976 and the Excellence Award at the Henry Moore Grand Prize Exhibition in 1979. He succeeded as head of the Kiyomizu Family in 1980, relinquishing the reins to his son Masahiro in 2000. According to the catalog from the recent Kyubei/Kazuo exhibtion “The works by Kiyomizu Hiroshi dating from the 1950s display handsome, geometric forms. Design like consideration is a sensibility shared by many ceramicists today and he gives us an impression that he was ahead of his time.
The National Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka hod 16 works
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1970 item #1375807 (stock #1199)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A rare set of Sake Service Vessels (Tokkuri) by important artist Yagi Kazuo stamped near the base the white slip and engraved with butterflies and a poem. Emblazoned is the verse
URAURANI
TERERU HARUBINI HIBARI AGARI
KOKORO KANASHIMO
HITORISHI OMOEBA
The lark takes flight on a spring day
Inadvertently I am taken with sadness
Left thinking alone…
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Pre 1980 item #1375157 (stock #1198)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A quintessential Mashiko work by important artist Hamada Shoji enclosed in a wooden box annotated by his son Shinsaku. It is 11-1/2 inches (29 cm) square. 7 cm (2-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Hamada Shoji was born in Tokyo, and enrolled in the Tokyo Technical University at the age of 19. In 1918 he met the important British potter Bernard Leach, and the history of ceramic arts was forever changed. One of the most influential and sought after of all Japanese Ceramic artists. There is no shortage of reading material for those who would like to learn more about this potter.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1374994 (stock #1195)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Yuteki Tenmoku Koro with wooden lid surmounted by a stone finial by Kimura Moriyasu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 5 inches (12.5 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kimura Moriyasu (b. 1935) studied pottery initially at the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (which turned out such masters as Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro) and then under his brother Kimura Morikazu. He is well known for his use of crawling and oil spot glazes. He exhibits with the Gendai Nihon Togeiten and Nihon Dento Kogeiten among others. He has been awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Order of Cultural Merit (2004). Work by him is held in the Britush Museum, Boston Museum, Dallas Museum and Ise Shrine among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1374899 (stock #1194)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An incredible organic form, the delicate petals appearing to waft in some tide by Shingu Sayaka enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A closed bud on the side is lined with hundreds of tiny sharp needles in black. It is 6 x 5 x 4 inches (15 x 13 x 10 cm) and in excellent condition.
Shingu Sayaka was born in Osaka, the industrial and commercial heartland of central Japan, in 1979. She graduated the Osaka University of Arts in 2001, before being selected as an artist in residence at the The Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park. She exhibits her amazing sculptures at the Asahi Togeiten where she has garnered a number of awards, and has a list of exhibitions to back up her popularity.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1970 item #1373518 (stock #1188)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A dish by preeminent avant-garde artist Yagi Kazuo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Haku Ogi Kashizara dating from the 1960s. The plate is ribbed like the surface of a folding fan, thus the name. It is roughly 7 inches (17.5 cm) diameter and is in excellent condition.
Yagi Kazuo (1918-1979) was one of the most influential Avant Garde potters of 20th century Japan. He was born into the family of potter Yagi Isso, a noted specialist in fine Chinese and traditional Japanese forms and glazes. Kazuo studied at the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility, like many great potters before him including his father and the founders of the Mingei movement, Kawai Kanjiro and Hamada Shoji. While there immersed in traditional forms, he joined the Ceramic Sculpture Association of Japan, and in 1939 was exhibited with them. Drafted shortly thereafter, he was sent to China, but quickly returned to japan with illness, for which he was discharged, and went back to sculpture, very much influenced by Western Art movements of the time. The war years were difficult of course, but following Japan’s Surrender, Kazuo was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition. Like many young artists who had been held in the yolk of Japan’s strict military regime, he was grasping for something new, and his work expressed a strong desire to throw off the weight of traditionalism and function. So it was in 1948 when Kazuo, along with a number of other potters including Suzuki Osamu, Yamada Hikaru and Kumakura Junkichi, founded the Iconic Sodeisha Group. The work of this group would change forever the perception of Japanese pottery, and he would go down as one of the most influential potters of the 20th century.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1373406 (stock #1187)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A spectacular work by Tsujimura Shiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box featuring a dark burn down one side, as if water has been pouring from the rim for centuries over the same place. The rough clay studded with inclusions and Shiseki is everything we have come to expect from this potter. The vase is 9 inches (23 cm) tall, 5 inches (12.5 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Tsujimura Shiro was born in Nara in 1947, and began his steps into the art world as an oil painter. While living at a Buddhist temple he experienced a profound connection with a Korean Tea Bowl, and began potting. He is highly acclaimed and somewhat reclusive, avoiding the public spectacles often needed to make one in Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1372681 (stock #1127)
An elegant elongated form displaying in a rustic, manner the various affects of rough Iga clay by Tanimoto Kei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Iga Hanaire. A dark shadow climbs up the side where the piece had been buried in a cloud of ash during the firing. Where it was not so protected, yellow green glaze accentuates the various textures benath. It is 21.3 cm tall, 9 cm diameter and in excellent condition.
Tanimoto Kei was born the son of Iga artist Tanimoto Kosei in 1948. In 1970 he apprenticed under Hineno Tatsuzo in Mino, and in his youth he experimented widely in many mediums, design, and even spent a few years in Paris learning the art of etching. He returned to Japn in 1977 to devote himself to the plastic arts.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1372170 (stock #1182)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A large tsubo in gold and white slip by Miyashita Hideko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Haku-a Kaki Rin to Shite Yo. The title speaks of standing up alone, and the artist told me it was a piece she created when she came to terms with the grief of her husband passing away and had decided to make a fresh go of life. The form was influenced by ancient Chinese maternal sculptures, thus the forward, broad stance. An image of one of the sculptures can be seen on a ticket stub from the museum exhibition which will be included. This was exhibited in 2016 at the Kyoto Kogei Bijutsu Sakka Kyokai Ten (Kyoto Society of Artist and Craftsperson Exhibition) and published in the catalog for that event. It is 11 x 14 x 19 inches (28 x 35.5 x 48 cm) and is in perfect condition.
Miyashita Hideko was born in Tatsuno, Hyogo prefecture in 1944. She graduated the Kyoto Municipal University of Arts in 1967, her final project garnering the Tomimoto Prize, and that year she was accepted into the Kyoto Prefectural Art Exhibition as well as the Kyoten. In honorable Japanese fashion she put her career second to that of her husband, the famed Miyashita Zenji, but remained active in the ceramics world through crafts during her long marriage. In 1978 she was awarded at the WCC Craft Competition, and her subsequent list of awards and shows in impressive, with solo exhibitions at some of Japan’s top galleries and participation in the Asahi Modern Craft Exhibition, Asahi Togeiten Ceramics Exhibition and the National Ceramics Exhib9tion (Nihon Togeiten). After the passing of her husband in 2012 she has been reinvigorated to work, creating more large scale and sculptural works which are grabbing attention.