Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1430242 (stock #1558)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Mukoyama Fumiya enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Zogan Yusai Fusha-mon Tsubo (Color Inlayed Wind Mill Pattern Tsubo). It is 25 cm (10 inches) diameter, 22 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Mukoyama Fumiya was born in Tokyo in 1960, graduating the Kyoto Ceramic Research institute before apprenticing in Hagi under 15th generation Sakakura Shinbei in 1984. He spent time in Shiga before settling in Mashiko in 1990, establishing his own kiln in 1993. The following year his work was collected by the Imperial Household Agency. He has been exhibited and or awarded at the National Craft Exhibition, National Traditional New Craft Exhibition, and Mashiko Pottery Exhibition among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 1980 item #1430144 (stock #1555)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A signature work by Kiyomizu Rokubei VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Golden light shines through the silhouette of iron colored trees on the tapering cylinder. It was a design technique developed by this generation. The original rosewood stand is included. The vase is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The Kiyomizu family potters managed one of the most productive workshops in Kyoto’s Gojozaka district throughout the second half of the Edo period. From the Meiji they began producing tableware for export and special pieces for government-sponsored exhibitions under Rokubei IV. Rokubei V led the kiln into the 20th century, and his son, Rokubei VI (1901-1980), would assume lead in 1945, taking the kiln through the tumultuous years after the Second World War. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, then the Kyoto Special School of Painting, before apprenticing under his father in 1925. He exhibited frequently and was often prized at the National Bunten, Teiten and Nitten Exhibits, where he later served as judge. He was also lauded abroad, in the USSR, France, Italy, Belgium and was appointed a member of the Japan Art Academy. In 1976 he was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit for his lifelong devotion to promoting Japanese pottery traditions. His works are held in numerous museums throughout the globe.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1429966 (stock #1553)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Swirling white brush strokes decorated with dabs of iron like leaves blowing in wind on this square form by Living National Treasure Shimaoka Tatsuzo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakeme Take Moyo Hoko (Bamboo Pattern on Brush Stroke Square Bottle). It is 10-1/2 inches (27 cm ) tall and in excellent condition.
After serving in World War II, Tatsuzo apprenticed under world famous Mashiko Mingei potter Hamada Shoji, establishing his own kiln in 1954. Working with rope patterns, Tatsuzo set out to create a style unique to himself, resulting in the piece you see here, which is quintessential Tatsuzo. In 1996 he was designated a Living National Treasure (Juyo Mukei Bunkazai or Ningenkokuho).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 1980 item #1429914 (stock #1551)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An iconic work in pale white by Living National Treasure Tsukamoto Kaiji enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakuji Karakusa Hachi (white porcelain bowl with Chinese Grass Design). The execution is breathtaking, so perfectly formed it demonstrates clearly the talent for which he was named a Living National Treasure. It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 8 cm (3 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Tsukamoto Kaiji (1912-1990) was fascinated with Song period Hakuji and Seihakuji porcelains and spent his life reviving that tradition. He received a Gold Medal at the 21st Century Exposition in California in 1964. In 1965 he was awarded at the 12th Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition, and was awarded again in 1967, the same year his work was exhibited at the worlds Expo in Montreal. He exhibited with the Nihon Togei Ten national Ceramics Exhibition from its inception in 1971. The following year he was once again awarded at the 19th Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Traditional Crafts Exhibition. He received the prestigious Japan Ceramic Society (JCS) award in 1979, and Japan-China Culture Award in 1980. In 1983 he was designated an Intangible Cultural Property (Living National Treasure) for Seiji and Seihakuji porcelain. Held in The National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, The National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto, The Museum of Oriental Ceramics in Osaka, Aichi Prefectural Ceramic Museum and Menard Art Museum among others. For more see “Japanese Studio Crafts” (1995) by R. Faulkner.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 1980 item #1429881 (stock #1550)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Red drips slide down the dark Tenmoku glaze on this small Tsutsu-chawan tea bowl by Living National Treasure Ishiguro Munemaro enclosed in a wooden box signed by his student and future Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi titled Ishiguro Munemaro Saku Tenmoku-yu Samon Chawan. It is 10 cm (4 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Ishiguro Munemaro (1893-1968) was born into a wealthy family in Toyama, and spent his childhood surrounded by precious Chinese ceramics in the collection of his father. Like many well born gentlemen of his time, he served in the Military, stationed in Korea until 1916. Upon returning to Japan, he took to the study of Chinese language and ceramics as a connoisseur. Shortly after he began potting, moving to Kyoto, establishing a studio in the mountain village of Yase Northeast of the city. His association with Koyama Fujio brought him into influential circles. He dedicated himself to the re-discovery and perfection of ancient glaze techniques, developing hundreds of glazes over his lifetime. He was designated one of the first Living National Treasures in 1955. Works by him reside in the permanent collections of the Aichi Prefectural Ceramic Museum; Musée National de Ceramique, Sèvres, France; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Museums of Modern Art, Kyoto and Tokyo.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 1980 item #1429847 (stock #1549)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Simple arcs of bent-grass in iron decorate this large bowl by living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tetsu-e Chawan. It is 14.8 cm (6 inches) diameter, 8 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes with a clipping from a newspaper announcing the naming of Uichi as Living National Treasure in 1985.
Shimizu Uichi (1926-2004) was born in Kyoto the son of a ceramic dealer. Discarding the family business he apprenticed in plastic arts under Ishiguro Munemaro. His work retains some principal elements of his teachers style while incorporating an understated elegance and avant-garde spirit of challenge uncommon for his time. He was first exhibited at the Nitten in 1951, receiving numerous awards there since. He also took the gold medal at the Prague International Exhibition, and was at the Brussels World Exposition. He is in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum, Kyoto Museum of Modern art, Clark Center and the Freer Gallery among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1429552 (stock #1546)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Five Sake Cups by the ;legendary Okabe Mineo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seto-Te Hai. The cups hav a very intimate feel, tiny, just enough room for a shot, each in a different style of Mino ware: Shino, E- Shino, Ki-Seto, Nezumi Shino, and Ao-Oribe. Each cup is 4.5 cm (1-3/4 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition. It even includes the artists biography from the time, still early in his career, likely 1950s.
Okabe Mineo (1919-1990) was born the first son of important artist Kato Tokuro, however the relationship with his father was volatile. When he was 9 Tokuro moved the young family to Seto, where Mineo would graduate the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics School in 1937. After a year at the family kiln, he moved to Tokyo, then joined the army in 1940. He fought against the Americans and would spend several years as a prisoner of war in the Philippines, repatriated to Japan in 1947. He returned to Aichi prefecture, leaving enough distance between himself and his estranged family, and with his wife began producing pottery in Toyoda. In 1953 he met Koyama Fujio; that same year he was awarded the Hokuto prize at the Nitten, and his work was collected by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This was the true beginning of his career. In 1955 he received the JCS award, one of the highest honors for a Japanese potter. By the mid ‘60s. he moved to celadon ware. He changed his name from Kato to Okabe in 1978, to honor his wife who supported his efforts for so many years.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1429253 (stock #1543)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Raised designs in slip decorate the yellow glaze of this deep bowl by Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in a kiriwood box titled O-yu Tsutsugaki-mon Wan annotated by Kawai Toshitaka, current head of the Kawai Kanjiro Museum. This piece dates from later in the artists illustrious career, 1950s-1960s. It is 4 inches (10 cm) diameter, 3-1/4 inches (5 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
All Items : Artists : Glass : Contemporary item #1429021 (stock #1540)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A minor divergence into one of the other plastic arts, here a silver flecked image of a carp made as a hanging vase by the iconic Kuroki Kuniaki accompanied by a signed wooden placard. It is 28 x 19 x 14 cm (11 x 7-1/2 x 5-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kuroki Kuniaki was born in Miyazaki prefecture in 1945. He began his career employed straight out of school by the Yamaya Glass Company in 1963. It would only be a decade later that he would venture out on his own, to begin creating unique works of glass art. Yet another ten years would pass before he went fully independent in 1984. He began with a project to revitalize Edo style Cut glass (Satsuma Kiriko), and established his workshop in 1989. He was awarded the National Order of Excellence for modern craft in 1991 and began to garner attention overseas. He was awarded in Paris in 1995, Rome in 1996 and Athens in 1997. Since he has been exhibited widely throughout Japan, as well as the US, Singapore, Throughout Europe, Taiwan, Australia among many others. His works have been collected by the Imperial Household Agency and the Royal Family. They are held in the collection of Philadelphia, Denmark Glass Museum, Peking Palace Museum and Kitazawa Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1970 item #1428698 (stock #1534)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A set of colorful Tokkuri in the shape of squared gourds by Living National Treasure Kato Hajime enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Aka-e Hohyo Tokkuri (red glazed Tokkuri in squared gourd form). About the white bottom are fortuitous characters in green with a belt of blue, yellow and green in the center. They are 15.5 cm (6 inches) tall. There is slight rubbing of the red glaze typical of handling. Enclosed with them is a photocopy from an art book (unknown publication) with an identical set of Tokkuri and the artists biography up until his death in 1968.
Kato Hajime (1900-1968, sometimes referred to as Toshiro, an alternate reading of his name) was born in Seto city, home of a long pottery tradition. However, after serving briefly at the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics School, he moved to rural Mino in Gifu in 1926, another locale long known for its pottery tradition. The following year he was awarded at the 8th Imperial Art Academy Exhibition, the same year was accepted at the first Crafts division Exhibition of the Bunten National Exhibition. In 1937 he would be awarded at the Paris World Exposition. From 1940 he would move to Yokohama, where he would delve extensively into the techniques of Ming decorated porcelain. From 1955 he would serve as head of the ceramics department and the Tokyo National University of Art. His career culminated in being named one of the early Living National Treasures (Juyo Mukei Bunkazai) in 1961. In 1966, he became the president of the Japan Crafts Association and also became an expert committee member on the Council for Protection of Cultural Properties. In 1967 he became professor emeritus of the Tokyo University of the Art. The same year he was awarded the Imperial Order of Cultural Merit (Purple Ribbon) by the reigning Emperor. He was commissioned to decorate the Take-no-ma audience room of the new Imperial Palace in Tokyo.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1428285 (stock #1530)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Dramatic waves are combed into the clay surface of this large Toban Platter by Living National Treasure Suzuki Osamu (Kura) covered in glass-like copper green; unusually signed and dated on bottom 1957 and enclosed in an artist signed wooden box. This has the wow factor in truckloads! A quintessential piece by this influential artist showing not only the innovation early in his career, but the consistency with which he approached Mino pottery, Museum quality, sure to become a centerpiece of any collection. It is 53.5 x 31 cm (21 x 12 inches) and in excellent condition.
Suzuki Osamu was born in Gifu prefecture in 1934, and graduated the Tajimi Technical School ceramics division in 1953. That same year he was awarded at the 6th Dento Kogeiten Traditional Crafts Exhibition. One of the great researchers, he spent many years excavating old kiln sites in an effort to re-invent Mino ware. In 1962 he was exhibited in Prague. And the next year took a prize at the Asahi Ceramic Exhibition. Very much lauded at this time, it culminated in 1969 when he received the JCS Gold award (Japan Ceramic Society), one of the highest honors for a Japanese potter. He would receive the JCS award again in 1982, and by that point be nurturing or inspiring a number of young potters aspiring to the forgotten ways of Shino ware. He was named a Living National Treasure in 1994 for his life-work. Work by him is held in a multitude of public collections throughout the world. For more see “Japanese Studio Crafts, Tradition and the Avant-Garde” (1995) by R. Faulkner.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1950 item #1428174 (stock #1528)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A small bowl in Kaki-yu by important artist Kawai Kanjiro enclosed in a wooden box upon which his friend and equally important artist Munakata Shiko has painted an image of the bowl outside titled Go-Kowan (Honorable small bowl) and inside annotated: Kanjiro Sensei Saku (Made by Kanjiro), signed Munakata Shiko. It is 10 cm (4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kawai Kanjiro (1890-1966) was a true artist by nature, and together with Hamada Shoji, set a pattern of study for modern potters. After graduating the Tokyo School of Industrial Design, he came to study in Kyoto, eventually establishing his own kiln on the Gojo-no-Saka (It remains standing today and is a must see for anyone visiting Kyoto). Together with compatriots Hamada Shoji and Bernard Leach (with whom he traveled throughout Asia) established the modern Mingei movement in ceramics, the most influential ceramics movement in the 20th century. His research on glazes (of which he developed thousands over a lifetime of work) remains influential as well. Refusing to be limited to ceramics, Kanjiro also worked in bronze, wood and paint. An interesting final note on this unusual artist, when offered the title of Living National Treasure, an honor bestowed on very few, he declined.
Munakata Shiko (1903-1975) is a dominant figure in Japanese twentieth-century prints. He was also very active as a poet, critic, painter in both Western and Japanese techniques, calligrapher and book designer. Munakata was born in Aomori in northern Honshu, the sixth of fifteen children of a forger of steel blades. Leaving school at thirteen, he joined the family business, but moved to a lawyer's office at seventeen, which gave him time to sketch. In 1921 he first saw reproductions of Van Gogh's works, which remained arguably his greatest inspiration throughout his life, and began to teach himself oil-painting. He moved to Tokyo in 1924, and lived by various means including drawing educational charts while continuing to paint He was accepted at the Teiten (Imperial Exhibition) in 1928. He became inspired by woodblock prints and by 1927 was experimenting with woodblocks. The following year he had his first prints accepted at the Creative Print Association Exhibition. In 1931 he had his first one-man show of prints in Tokyo. Munakata began to write in 'Han geijutsu' magazine in 1932, which brought him into contact with Maekawa Senpan and the folk style. He fell into the circle of the Folk Art Movement with its great potter Kawai Kanjiro, and i 1936 he spent 40 days at Kawai's house where he developed a Buddhist dimension to add to his already strong folk and Shinto interests and subject-matter. The two remained lifelong friends. His home in Tokyo was destroyed in the second world war, and he spent seven years in Toyama, at the end of which his work was accepted in São Paolo in 1951, which marks the beginning of his subsequent international career. In 1952 he helped establish the Japanese Print Institute. In 1952 he won a prize at Lugano and in 1955 the first prize for prints at the São Paolo Biennale, and in 1956 at the Venice Biennale. These made his reputation not only internationally but also at home, where he now became a celebrity and was subsequently heaped with honours culminating with the 'Kunsho' (Order of Merit) in 1970. The Munakata Memorial Museum in Aomori opened the day after his funeral. There is also a museum devoted to his prints in Kamakura, while large collections of his works are in the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, the Folk Art Museum, Tokyo, and the Ohara Museum Complex in Kurashiki.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1428110 (stock #1526)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A vibrant double vase covered in signature naïve designs by Yamashita Moe enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Morinoyoru (Night in the forest). It is 12 x 24.5 x 27 cm (5 x 10 x 11 inches) and is in excellent condition. Her work is filled with joie de vie, and one cannot escape a smile when viewing it. Even the box is painted with a bright green silhouette of the vase, titled and signed in pink!
Yamashita Moe graduated the Kyoto Zokei University of Art in 2004. Her work has been accepted into a number of important Expositions including the Asahi Modern Craft Exhibition and the Rimpa Forever exhibition held at the Museum of Kyoto. She has nearly a dozen solo exhibitions, quite surprising for a young artist, and has participated in more than 30 group exhibitions. According to the artist, “I create works of organic form based on images of plants, creatures, and the scenery of my travels. I strive to make vessels that are fun and make the viewer happy.”
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1427545 (stock #1522)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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I find this piece captivating, the golden thorns rupturing the rough and blank matte white clay. When I asked the artist about his concept, he explained the clay body is the individual formed by self-image, societal pressure, ego, all the things which constrict our actions and channel our emotions. The thorns are the true inner self bursting out of the surface, irrepressible, they pierce the shell and shine like the sun. Though the visible surface may be flat, rough-hewn, colorful, torn, matte, dark, muddled, the inner self is always golden. In this case, the inner form of glazed clay is covered in pallet-loads of matte raw porcelain, and with the different cooling temperatures, that has cracked and fissured, accentuating the golden thorns rupturing through the surface. It is 14 cm tall (6 inches) and in new condition, directly from the artist this spring enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
Masatomo Toi was born in Aichi Prefecture in 1992, and graduated the Design course at the Tajimi Ceramics Research Facility in 2019. Since he has been developing his series “Thorny” while preparing for a year in Australia (which has been put on hold like all of our lives due to the virus).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1426912 (stock #1517)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A sculpture of assembled ceramic shards by Yorigami Munemi in mottled moon colors enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Recreations, Futatsu no Hankyu Tai (Two hemispheres). It is 28 cm (11 inches) diameter, 10 cm (4 inches) tall and in fine condition.
Yorigami Munemi was born in Kyoto in 1944, but went to Tokyo to study gardening at the Tokyo University of Agriculture, graduating in 1967. Two years later he apprenticed in ceramics under Yagi Kazuo, founding member of the avant-garde Sodeisha group, which Yorigami then joined. He has also exhibited domestically at the Asahi Togeiten Ceramics and Asahi Craft Exhibition among many others. In 1991 he was awarded gold at the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition, and the following year exhibited in Cairo Egypt and Melbourne Australia (awarded) as well as being awarded at the Modern Ceramics Grand Prix Exhibition held at the National Museum of History in Taipei, Taiwan. The next year he was accepted into the exhibition “Ceramics Today” held at the Aichi Prefectural Museum. In 2001 His work was part of the exhibition “Kyoto Crafts 1945-2000” which was held at the Tokyo and Kyoto National Museums of Modern Art.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1426874 (stock #1514)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A large bowl by important contemporary porcelain artist Yagi Akira enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The shape is very elegant, with stiffly rising sides leading to an abrupt undulating rim in soft celadon green. A striking silhouette, it is 22 cm (8-1/2 inches) diameter, 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
This name is a must have in any collection of modern Japanese Pottery. Akira was born in Kyoto in 1955, son of avant-garde Yagi Kazuo (1918-1979) one of the founding members of Sodeisha. Akira was voted one of the 20 most important living artists by Honoho, Japans premier printed ceramic forum. Works by the artist are held in the British Museum, Victoria Albert Museum, Cleveland Art Museum, Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian and Tokyo Muesum of Modern Art among many others. He was also the recipient of the Japan Ceramic Society (JCS) award in 1998, one in a long and prestigious list of awards.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1426776 (stock #1515)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A peacock stands among abstract patterns, drying fish, birds and geometrics on this large dish by Ito Hokuto with Shiori and Shifuku enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yusai Iro-e Kin Gin Sai Hakkaku Zara (Silver, Gold and Colored Glaze 8-Sided Dish). It is 42 cm (16-1/2 inches) across and in excellent condition.
Ito Hokuto was born in the Nakano ward of Tokyo in 1961, and grew up in a prolific time which defined modern Japan and Japanese pop culture. He graduated the Tokyo University of Fine Art in 1987, moving to advanced courses in ceramics which he finished in 1988. He then apprenticed under Living National Treasure Fujimoto Masamichi, entering his first public exhibition in 1990 at the Nihon Dento Kogei Shinsaku-ten National Exhibition of New Crafts. In 1993 he opened his own kiln in Hino City, Tokyo. He has since been exhibited at many of Japans top galleries as well as the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Dento Kogeiten) among many others. His work emphasizes not only traditional themes but elevates pop art in his design concept.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Sculptural : Pre 2000 item #1426511 (stock #1513)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A sculpture of unglazed white porcelain and wood by Yagi Akira enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Jiki CLOD 92-13 (Porcelain Mass CLOD 92-13) exhibited at Gallery Koyanagi in Tokyo’s fashionable Ginza district in 1992. The original exhibition invitation card, featuring this piece, is included. The stand is 18 inches (46 cm) long an all is in excellent condition.
This name is a must have in any collection of modern Japanese Pottery. Akira was born in Kyoto in 1955, son of avant garde Yagi Kazuo (1918-1979) one of the founding members of Sodeisha. Akira was voted one of the 20 most important living artists by Honoho, Japans premier printed ceramic forum. Works by the artist are held in the British Museum, Victoria Albert Museum, Cleveland Art Museum, Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian and Tokyo Muesum of Modern Art among many others. He was also the recipient of the Japan Ceramic Society (JCS) award in 1998, one in a long and prestigious list of awards.