Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Pre 2000 item #1437939 (stock #1627)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A seminal work by Shigaraki legend Otani Shiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Here you will find no overt extension of the self, no insertion of ego, no attempt at distraction, only the true mastery of this artist and his ability. Absolute perfection in form shows his mastery of throwing, blemish-less surface his time spent preparing and purifying the clay, and superlative flow of natural ash his skill at placement in the kiln and the firing process. It is 10 inches (25 cm) tall, 8-1/2 inches (22 cm) diameter and in excellent condition For an indepth look at this potter see the articl by Rob Barnard in Ceramics Monthly volume 39 (Summer 1991).
Otani Shiro was born in Shigaraki in 1936 and graduated the Prefectural School in the ceramics department in 1956, which he followed up with 4 years studying decorating techniques under Morioka Yutaro. He then moved to Kyoto where he studied at the Municipal Ceramics Research Facility, where he trained under Kiyomizu Kyubei, Shofu Eichi and Uchida Kunio before returning to Shigaraki to yet further his studies in design. He garnered his first award at the Shiga Prefectural Art Exhibition in 1962, as well as the Governor’s prize at the National Rodosha Bijutsu-Ten Exhibition. He took a position with an industrial kiln in Shigaraki in 1963, and began potting in his free time, exhibiting and being awarded at the Asahi Togeiten among others. In 1968, he left his position at the kiln, and in 1969 was first accepted into the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogeiten). In 1973 he established his own kilns in Shigaraki, both an Anagama submerged kiln and a climbing kiln, and began learning from future Living National Treasure Shimizu Uichi. From there he participated in the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten (National crafts Exhibition) as well as innumerable private exhibitions both domestic and International, and was named an Intangible Cultural Asset of Shigaraki in 1990. His work is held in The Museum of Art in Atlanta, The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Fogg Art Gallery of Harvard as well as the Morikami Museum and Smithsonian among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Plates : Contemporary item #1437404 (stock #1616)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, with thanks!
A swirling iron colored ceramic dish by Takatsu Mio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Uzumaki no Sara. It is 20 x 18 x 8.5 cm (8 x 7 x 3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, from the artist this summer. We use one of these at home for cheese and cold cuts, looks great with a wine glass and garners a lot of attention!
Takatsu Mio (b. 1976) was raised in Gifu prefecture among the scattered kilns of Mino. She graduated the Osaka University of Arts Sculpture Department in 1999, moving on to advanced studies which she completed in 2001. Her first exhibited works were in 1999, and then again in Tokyo in 2001. The following year she exhibited with the 6th International Ceramics Exhibition in Mino with several private exhibitions over the following years in some of Japans top venues. In 2005 she made her overseas debut. In 2009 her work was featured in Women Ceramic Artists in the 21st Century (Paramita Museum/Mie Japan) 2011 saw her work accepted into the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition in Italy, as well as the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1436562 (stock #1611)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A rock textured Kurinuki tokkuri compliments this guinomi selected to match by Inayoshi Osamu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The Tokkuri is 5 inches (12 cm) tall, the Guinomi 2-3/4 inches (7 cm) diameter and both are in perfect condition, enclosed in the original wooden box from the artist this summer.
Inayoshi Osamu was born in Aichi prefecture, the heart of Mino country, in 1976. He completed his initial training in the plastic arts at the Seto Pottery School in 2002, garnering an award that same year at the 56th Seto City Art Exhibition. In 2007 he established his own kiln in Toyohashi, and was awarded at the 19th Heart of Oribe Pottery exhibition (again the following year). In 2008 he began to focus on the Atsumi pottery of the Heian and Kamakura periods, building up a unique repertoire. After several more domestic shows and prizes, he had his overseas debut in 2010, and has since received a great deal of attention both at home and abroad.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1436551 (stock #1612)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
Grasses grow on the sides of this Tokkuri and accompanying Guinomi by Karatsu legend Maruta Munehiko, each piece enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The E-Karatsu Tokkuri is 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall. The E-Karatsu Guinomi is 7 cm (2-3/4 inches) diameter, 6 cm (2-1/2 inches) tall. Both are in excellent condition.
Maruta Munehiko was born the second son of Maruta Masami in Saga prefecture in 1961. However he apprenticed under Hamada Atsuya (1931-1986), the son of Mashiko Living National Treasure Hamada Shoji, in 1980. Specializing in Karatsu ware, he opened his first kiln in 1987, and a Noborigama climbing kiln in 2000. He has exhibited at any number of important galleries like and juried exhibitions including the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihin Dento Kogeiten) and his 25th anniversary exhibition at the prestigious Kuroda Toen. He is held in the collection o the Minneapolis Institute of Art among other important public and private collections.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1436334 (stock #1607)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, Thank you!
A flagrant barrage of color gets in your face with this futuristic vessel by Yanagihara Mutsuo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Saimon Kabin (Colored Vase). Over the crackled sunshine yellow gleams platinum on lightning strikes of red, completely juxtaposed to the cool blue of the interior. Very much an iconic work by this eclectic artist. It is 17.5 cm (7 inches) diameter, 15 cm (6 inches) tall and in perfect condition.
Yanigahara Mutsuo (b.1934) was raised in Seto, and studied in Kyoto along with contemporary Morino Taimei with whom he maintained a lifelong friendship. His work is largely sculptural, and his choice of colors is his reflection on the decadence of Japanese society. A list of exhibitions and awards would be much too long but includes the Japan Ceramics Society Gold prize in 2002. Listed as one of the most influential potters of the 20th century in the Japanese ceramics magazine Honoho Geijutsu, he is held in the Museum of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto (MOMAT, MOMAK), The National Museum of Art, Osaka, V&A, Great Victoria Art Gallery, Portland and any number of other prominent public and private collections throughout the world. For more see Japanese Studio Crafts, Tradition and the Avant Garde by Rupert Faulkner. According to the V&A his “work is striking for its blend of dynamism, colour and wit. A leading figure among Kyoto artists, Yanagihara has taught at Osaka University of Arts since 1968. Yanagihara's application of brightly coloured abstract motifs to vessel forms with anatomical, sometime sexually explicit features - a combination with which he first experimented in the late 1960s and early 1970s - has been a characteristic of his work for the past fifteen years. As in the case of Morino Taimei, a close friend and exact contemporary at Kyoto City University of Arts in the late 1950s, Yanagihara has been considerably influenced by the experiences he gained during two periods of teaching in the United States in 1966-8 and 1972-4. His use of gold and silver - a wry comment, he has explained, on the decaying values of contemporary society and the corruption of Japan's political system - echoes the extravagant style of certain North American artists.”
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1436154 (stock #1603)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, with thanks!
A set of ten sake cups by Takegoshi Jun depicting Umi-no-sachi (treasures of the sea) in aka-e and overglaze enamels enclosed in the original compartmentalized wooden box. Each cup is uniquely decorated with a delicacy in the raw, Shrimp, Red Snapper, blow fish et al. Each cup is 8 cm (roughly 3 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Takegoshi Jun (alternatively written Takekoshi) was born in Ishikawa prefecture, home to Kutani Yaki, the son of the third generation Takegoshi Taizan (1919-1984) in the early post-war era, 1948. He learned pottery techniques under his father, while training in Nihonga painting at the Kanazawa University of Fine Art, graduating in 1971. He then apprenticed under the Kutani monument Kitade Fujio, and began exhibiting with the Nitten National Exhibition. Since he has exhibited with many venues, garnering awards at the aforementioned Nitten, Shin Kogeiten New Crafts Fair, took top prize at the 38th Gendai Kogeiten (Modern Crafts Fair, and has been featured several times on Japanese Television. He received the Prestigious JCS award, on e of the highest honors for a Japanese potter, n 2007. Works by him are held in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, The Minneapolis Institute of Art, Victoria & Albert Museum in London, the Newark Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Art Gallery among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1436034 (stock #1600)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, thank you!
Glaze Bidoro sweep upwards toward one red eye on this amazing tsubo by Yukuyoshi Manabe enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen Yohen Tsubo. It is 11 inches (28 cm) diameter, 10-1/4 inches (26 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
Yukuyoshi Manabu was born in Kagatonishi near the heart of Bizen country in 1941. After working in Osaka as a young man, he returned to Bizen to assist the family building supply company. There he began to study clay under Mori Hozan and Ohira Seinosuke. After rebuilding an old kiln, he established his own. He ahs exhibited with the Issuikai Ten, the Chunichi Kokusai Togeiten, the National Ceramic Exhibition (Nihon Togeiten) among many others and has received a great many awards over his career.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1435913 (stock #1598)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A Spectacular Bizen Tsubo dripping with ash glaze by Yukuyoshi Manabu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen Yohen Tsubo (Kiln altered). The rim is covered in built up black ash, which grows more liquid as it enters the burning embers on the side, and is blasted around in rivulets to the back where it has created two shadows of raw earth where another pot was in close proximity. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 21.5 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yukuyoshi Manabu was born in Kagatonishi near the heart of Bizen country in 1941. After working in Osaka as a young man, he returned to Bizen to assist the family building supply company. There he began to study clay under Mori Hozan and Ohira Seinosuke. After rebuilding an old kiln, he established his own. He ahs exhibited with the Issuikai Ten, the Chunichi Kokusai Togeiten, the National Ceramic Exhibition (Nihon Togeiten) among many others and has received a great many awards over his career.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1433723 (stock #1594)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
There is something deeply elegant and feminine about the work of the female Maki-e artist Arai Etsuko, clearly evident here in this glass sake set decorated with olives in colored lacquer and precious gold powder enclosed in a compartmentalized and signed wooden box. Inside, the simple black silhouette, outside, various shades of green connected by gold branches from which hang fruit in various stages of ripeness. The Tokkuri is 17 cm (6-3/4 inches) tall, the cups 5 cm (2 inches) diameter. All are in new condition, directly from the artist this year.
Arai Etsuko (born in Kanagawa in 1980) apprenticed under Hiroshi Okada after Graduating the Kyoto School of Traditional Arts in 2003. For seven years she learned the arts of maki-e and kanshitsu, nunobari and inlay, working both on new pieces, as well as in the restoration of antique items, giving her a deep understanding of the various processes of lacquer over the centuries. In 2010 she moved out on her own. Her work is characterized by the exquisite mixture of traditional lacquer ware manufacturing methods and the delicate and gentle style unique to a woman. Her work has been exhibited at various venues throughout Japan, including the Asahi Craft exhibition and Kyoten. She was designated a Traditional Craftsperson (Dento Kogeishi)of Kyoto in 2014, Nationally in 2015. In a recent conversation She said she was drawn to the world of Lacquer by its glitter and sheen. Unlike drawing or pottery, the creation of lacquer art has no immediate sense of gratification, the imagery is brought out through layers over weeks or months, often invisible until the final stages. A most demanding medium, patience and diligence are paramount, but the result is unlike any other artform, and with proper care, can be passed through the generations, an heirloom to span the centuries.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1433354 (stock #1593)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, Thank you!
This past summer I had occasion to visit Richard Milgrim in his Mountain Studio and asked him to pair some sake cups and Tokkuri for us. It is a rare opportunity to have an artist personally select pieces which he feels work together. This set is making use of his signature Concord glaze (Konko-yu) from America, with clay from Japan, while the cup is also using a variant of that glaze Black Concord (Konko-guro). The Tokkuri is 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter, 12 cm (5 inches) tall. The rim of the cup wavers between 6 and 6.5 cm diameter (roughly 2 inches) and both are new from the artist in perfect condition.
Richard Milgrim (b. 1955) of White Plains New York graduated Antioch College in 1979 following a year travelling in Japan and internship at the Fogg Museum of Harvard. That same year he began down a path, following a “way” as it is called in Japan, Sado or Chanoyu, the Japanese Tea Ceremony. That same year he returned to Japan, apprenticing initially under Iwabuchi Shigeya while studying at the Midorikai of Urasenke. His first solo exhibition was held in 1981, one of many, and he subsequently began to move about Japan, gobbling up styles under various masters such as Living National Treasure Fujiwara Yu, Kato Koemon and Tahara Tobei. He established his own kiln in Hiyoshi, North of Kyoto in 1984. He is probably the only foreign potter to be truly accepted into the brand conscious world of Japanese tea, and his shows frequently sell out early. From 2000 to 2014 he spit his time between Hiyoshi and a kiln he established in Concord Massachusetts, where he developed some innovative techniques and glazes now firmly a part of his repertoire in Japan. He is adept therefore with Shino, Oribe, Bizen, Seto, Karatsu and Yakishime styles. According to Richard “Since 1977 on my first arrival in Kyoto, I have been blessed with an unending flow of "deai" (encounters) that have almost been like stepping stones on the garden path, leading me into the innermost depths of the field of "Chatou" (tea ceramics).Undoubtedly the most significant "deai" was meeting Dr. Sen Genshitsu (the former 15th generation Grand Master of the Urasenke Tea Tradition), in 1979. With his guidance and endorsement over the years, including the naming of my 2 studios in both Japan-RICHADO-GAMA, and America- KONKO-GAMA, Dr. Sen has been the primary catalyst in the development of my career over the past 40 years.”
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1432983 (stock #1591)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A jaw-dropping igneous chawan tea bowl by Inayoshi Osamu like a shimmering mineral deposit found deep inside some calcitic limestone cavern. When I asked him about the effects on the surface, he said that he could not wholly explain them, they were some mystery of the kiln, caused during the firing. The bowl is 13.8 x 13 x 9.5 cm (5-1/2 x 5 x 4 inches) and in excellent condition. It comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box with shiori and shifuku, hand-picked from the artist this summer.
Inayoshi Osamu was born in Aichi prefecture, the heart of Mino country, in 1976. He completed his initial training in the plastic arts at the Seto Pottery School in 2002, garnering an award that same year at the 56th Seto City Art Exhibition. In 2007 he established his own kiln in Toyohashi, and was awarded at the 19th Heart of Oribe Pottery exhibition (again the following year). In 2008 he began to focus on the Atsumi pottery of the Heian and Kamakura periods, building up a unique repertoire. After several more domestic shows and prizes, he had his overseas debut in 2010, and has since received a great deal of attention both at home and abroad.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1432865 (stock #1590)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A stone formed bowl covered entirely in platinum by Inayoshi Osamu enclosed in the original signed wooden box accompanied by the shiori and Shifuku. The bowl is carved and torn from a block of clay, then textured with natural stones specially selected for their surface patterns, splashed with glaze and then covered in platinum, creating dry. Matte regions punctuated by glistening liqid spatters. It is 10 cm (4 inches) diameter, 7.5 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition from the artist this summer.
Inayoshi Osamu was born in Aichi prefecture, the heart of Mino country, in 1976. He completed his initial training in the plastic arts at the Seto Pottery School in 2002, garnering an award that same year at the 56th Seto City Art Exhibition. In 2007 he established his own kiln in Toyohashi, and was awarded at the 19th Heart of Oribe Pottery exhibition (again the following year). In 2008 he began to focus on the Atsumi pottery of the Heian and Kamakura periods, building up a unique repertoire. After several more domestic shows and prizes, he had his overseas debut in 2010, and has since received a great deal of attention both at home and abroad.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1432398 (stock #1402)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A bottomless green pool by master of Seihakuji Kato Tsubusa enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Wan. A big telltale tear drop reaches down to grasp the table, exquisite. It is 5-1/2 inches (14 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kato Tsubusa was born in Tajimi city, the home of Shino, in 1962, graduating the municipal Pottery Design and Technical Center in 1979. However, after working some in pottery, he moved on to white porcelain, a leap from which he has never looked back. He has been displayed at the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, The Chunichi Kokusai Togei Ten (Chunichi International Ceramics Exhibition) and The Asahi Togei Ten as well as private exhibitions overseas (New York among others). Work by him is held in the Aichi Ceramics Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, The Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, The Brooklyn Museum, The Gifu Museum of Modern Ceramic Art, the Ibaraki Ceramic art Museum, the Musee Tomo in Tokyo, the Victoria & Albert Museum among others For more on this important artist see Toh, Volume 85 (1993), which is entirely dedicated to him. Also Quiet Clarity “RIN” (1996), or Fired with passion: Contemporary Ceramics of Japan (2007).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1432337 (stock #1586)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, with thanks!
A fabulous thin walled Bizen basin made for use as a fresh water container for the Japanese Tea Ceremony with black lacquered wooden lid enclosed in the original signed wooden box by Living National Treasure Yamamoto Toshu. This burnished style reminiscent of sangiri techniques is the signature work of this important Bizen artist. Here a plethora of colors vie for dominance on the ordinarily sedate brown clay. It is 22 cm diameter, 13 cm tall and in excellent condition.
For more on this important artist sea the recent exhibition: The Bizen, at the Miho Museum in Shiga prefecture, in which a number of this artists’ works were featured. Yamamoto Toshu (1906-1994) began working in a pottery at the age of 15. 12 years later (1933) he went independent, but interestingly decided to train again later not under a Bizen master, but Kusube Yaichi, perhaps stimulating his unusual eye for Bizen. After much acclaim, it was in 1959 that he made his worldwide appearance, with a gold prize at the Brussels World Exposition, and was named an important cultural property of Okayama that same year. He was most in love with the wheel, and his forms are crisp and sharp. He was named a living national Treasure in 1987. Works by the artist are held in the National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo and National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto as well as the Victoria Albert Museum among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 2000 item #1432324 (stock #1585)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, with thanks!
A most unusual tea bowl charred black on one side which emenates a golden glow on the raw earth opposite, by Bizen living national Treasure Yamamoto Toshu enclosed in the original signed double wood storage box titled Bizen Yohen Chawan (Kiln Altered Tea bowl) with silk wrapping cloth. The beauty of kiln altered works is that they are quite often entirely unique. Something unexpected that occurred inside the kiln during the firing or cooling process, that caused a deviation from the norm or expected result. Yohen is in fact a bit unusual in Bizen ware, and I have never seen another like this particular bowl, with its shimmering golden reflection. Unfortunately the ephemeral effect is very difficult to capture on the camera. It is 5 inches (13 cm) diameter, and in excellent condition.
Yamamoto Toshu (1906-1994) began working in a pottery at the age of 15. 12 years later (1933) he went independent, but interestingly decided to train again later not under a Bizen master, but Kusube Yaichi, perhaps stimulating his unusual eye for Bizen. After much acclaim, it was in 1959 that he made his worldwide appearance, with a gold prize at the Brussels World Exposition, and was named an important cultural property of Okayama that same year. He was most in love with the wheel, and his forms are crisp and sharp. He was named a living national Treasure in 1987. Works by the artist are held in the National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo and National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto as well as the Victoria Albert Museum among many others. For more on this important artist sea the recent exhibition: The Bizen, at the Miho Museum in Shiga prefecture, in which a number of this artists’ works were featured.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1432245 (stock #1585)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, with thanks!
A petaled vase in snow s\white porcelain with silver blossoming from the rim by Itaya Narumi enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, from the artist this year. Itaya Narumi was born in Gifu in 1991, and graduated the Toki City Ceramics Research Facility in 2015. She has participated in several exhibitions since, with an emphasis on natural forms and tactile senses.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1432220 (stock #1584)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, thank you!
Pale jade spots dot the incised surface of this unusual vase by Nagae Shigekazu enclosed in the original signed wooden box retaining the Shiori and Shifuku. The vase, if not for its distant, moon-like quality, has a very pop-art-presence, blending both the austerity of Japanese traditional aesthetics with contemporary art. Fun and moving; a haunting pleasure. It is 14 inches (35.5 cm) tall, 5 inches (13 cm) square at the base, 7 inches (19 cm) wide at the rim and in excellent condition.
Nagae Shigekazu (b. 1953) graduated the Seto Industrial School of Ceramics in 1974 Beginning to grab attention in the late 70s, he has striven to perfect porcelain casting techniques, creating one-off shapes and forms previously impossible. He is held in the collection of the V&A (London), LACMA (Los Angeles) and the National Gallery of Australia, Cincinnati and Cleveland Art Museums, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Japan Foundation and many many others. With very low output, this is a rare opportunity to join the worlds top museum collections by acquiring this artist.
According to Ceramics Now Magazine: Nagae Shigekazu (born in 1953), is one of the leading pioneers of porcelain casting and firing techniques in Japan. Casting is commonly associated with the mass production of porcelain, yet Nagae valiantly transcends this stereotype, ultimately elevating this technique to the avant-garde. Casting alone cannot achieve the natural movements found within Nagae’s forms. His popularity and recognition as an artist have skyrocketed, with acquisitions by the V&A in London, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the National Gallery of Australia in just the past 3 years. Also collected by leading institutions such as the Musée National de Ceramique-Sèvres in Paris and the Musée Ariana in Geneva, among others, as well as receiving prestigious awards such as the Grand Prixs at the 1998 Triennale de la Porcelain in Nyon, the Mino Ceramic Festival and the Japan Ceramic Art Exhibition (both 1997), Nagae’s stature and respect in the world of porcelain has reached new heights.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1431381 (stock #1572)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
Sold, thank you!
One of the best I have ever seen by him. A metallic Shino Chawan by Tsukigata Nahiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Oni Shino Yohen O-Chawan and named inside Rokugo (also read Rikugo) which is something to do with the ancient concept of the tertiary levels of heaven and earth. Rokugo is outside the Human realm, the universe, the heavens. It is 5-1/2 inches (14 cm) diameter, 4 inches (10 cm) tall and in excellent condition complete with silk pouch and double wood black lacquered outer box with original naming paper by Nahiko.
Tsukigata Nahiko (1923-2006) was not only an accomplished ceramic artist, but also a painter, calligrapher, sculptor and musician. Born in Niigata prefecture, he was at Waseda University in 1941 when he was summarily drafted into the Army. After the war he attended the Arts course of Nippon Daigaku University and was struck by the works of Living National Treasure Arakawa Toyozo, to whom he apprenticed in the arts of Shino and took his mentors work to a new level. Like all art, his was alive and always evolving. Starting with the replication and research of Momoyama techniques to the culmination of his efforts in Oni-shino, Nahiko has taken Shino beyond all others. It was not an easy road, for the first 15 years he worked for a ballet school, spent time as a recluse priest at Myoanji temple, and wandered the country playing the shakuhachi. It was a time of great change in Japan, starvation was rampant immediately after the war and supporting oneself through the little-known art of Shino-yaki was difficult. However, he persevered, along with Toyozo, Kato Juuemon, Kato Kohei and others, to bring Shino to the forefront of ceramic arts. Heavily prized domestically and abroad in his lifetime, his low output and unique quality make his work a must have for collectors.