Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1451287 (stock #1560)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Tarnished silver glows dully inside this raw clay bowl by female pottery pioneer Ogawa Machiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Wan. It is 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter, 7 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ogawa Machiko was born in Sapporo on the Northern Island of Hokkaido in 1946. She studied under future Living National Treasures Fujimoto Yoshimichi, Tamura Koichi and Kato Hajime at the Tokyo University of Arts, graduating in 1969, then went on to further studies in France and Africa, returning to Japan in 1975. She began garnering attention in the mid eighties, and has since become one of the leading female figures in Japanese pottery. She was awarded the JCS prize in 2001, one of Japans most prestigious awards. Work by her is held in the Brooklyn Art Museum, LACMA, New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, Smith College, MIA, MOMAT and a host of others. For more see “Touch Fire, Contemporary Ceramics by Women Artists” (2009) or Toh, volume 67 (1993).
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1451052 (stock #1535)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A very elegant swirling bowl inflated like a balloon in dark lapis with applied silver basin by rising female star Takemura Yuri enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Sora Fune (Air Ship). It is 13.5 cm (just less than 6 inches) diameter, from 4.5 to 7.5 cm (2-3 inches) tall at the high end and in excellent condition, dating circa 2017.
Takemura Yuri was born in Nagoya, Aichi prefecture in 1980, daughter of a graphic designer. She came to ceramics after first working with oil paints. Frustrated at the two dimensional limitations of the canvas, the free form of pottery was a perfect medium to express her sense of design. She graduated the ceramics department of the Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Art in 2004, then was accepted as an artist in residence at the Shiga Prefectural Togei no Mori Ceramics Research Facility, where she stayed until 2006. Again, she moved to the Udatsuyama Ceramic center in Kanazawa city until 2009, and remains in that area today. She has been awarded at the National Crafts Exhibition, the Kikuchi Bienale, the Kanazawa Crafts Exhibition and the International Mino Exhibition (Kokusai Tojikiten Mino). Work by her is held in the Aichi Prefectural Ceramics Museum, The Kanazawa 21st Century Museum, as well as the Portland Art Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1450868 (stock #1795)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A stratified bloc of hollowed out Shigaraki clay by female pottery pioneer Koyama Kiyoko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Shizen Yu Kaku Hanaire. A thick coating of blown natural ash glaze has settled on the shoulders, while the layers of earth below show a dusting of color on top, but rich red in the shadows with plenty of small inclusions for the eye to play with. It is 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall, roughly 10 cm (4 inches) square and in excellent condition.
Koyama Kiyoko was the subject of the film Hi-Bi (2005) and the recent NHK television drama Scarlet. She is the preeminent pioneering female wood firing artist in Japan. Born in Sasebo, Nagasaki in 1938, she went to Shigaraki village, home of one of Japan’s Six Ancient Kilns. There she studied the traditional techniques, and bore the brunt of centuries of discrimination against women. Through it all she persevered to become one of the most highly sought of Shigaraki potters. For more on her works see Modern Japanese Ceramics in American Collections, Japan Society New York, 1993
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 2000 item #1450708 (stock #1791)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A stunning and unusual Chawan tea bowl in burnt orange glaze with abstract splashes of black by Kawamoto GOro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Perfectly formed, with a wide base and slightly concave sides leading to a pouty rim, all draped in this haunting ochre with poured black graffiti. A masterpiece by this important artist. It is 11.5 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter, 8 cm (3-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawamoto Goro (1919-1986) was born in Seto to a family of potters. He studied in Kyoto at the same institution as Kawai Kanjiro and Hamada Shoji. Returning to work at the family kiln, he was later adopted by Kawamoto Rekitei, a famous decorator of pottery. In 1953 he gained first recognition, accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition and garnering top prize at the Asahi Modern Ceramics Exhibition. In 1958 he would be awarded in Brussels, and in 1959 in California and at home was granted the 1959 JCS award winner. Much lauded the list is much too long for this article. work by him is held in the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art as well as the The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo among many others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1450667 (stock #1790)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Product of the pure spirit of Shigaraki tradition and the pure winds of the inferno and impurities of the clay is this fabulous chawan tea bowl by the inspiring Furutani Kazuya enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Chawan. It has a rugged complexion with raw sunburnt clay dappled with spattered ash and a wide, solid, base. Enjoy the weight of it in your hands, then turn it over and marvel at the glistening jade gem clinging to the bottom. It is 12 cm (5 inches) diameter 8 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition, directly from the artist.
Furutani Kazuya was born the son of Anagama legend Furutani Michio in 1976. He graduated the Yamaguchi College of Art in 1997, and spent a year at the ceramics research facility in Kyoto before returning to work under his father in Shigaraki. His Father’s sudden death in 2000 pushed Kazuya to the fore, and left him with big shoes to fill. That he has done! Building three Anagama in the following decade and displaying with the National Ceramics Exhibition and a number of private affairs in some of Japan’s top venues. He was just preparing for a solo exhibit at the prestigious Kuroda Toen Gallery when we met him late in the autumn.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1450526 (stock #1276)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An organic form by young female artist Tanaka Tomomi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mimi-nari and dating from 2017. It is 6 x 6 x 5-1/2 inches (15 x 15 x 14 cm) and is in excellent condition.
Tanaka Tomomi was born in Hyogo prefecture, near Kobe, in 1983, and graduated advanced courses at the Aichi University of Education in 2008, however her work has been garnering attention in various exhibitions since 2005. She has received the Kyoto Mayor’s Award at the “39th Women’s Association of Ceramic Art” in 2005, and been prized at the 2006 and 2007 Asahi Togeiten Ceramic Art Exhibition. In 2014 she was given Silver at the 10th International Ceramics Competition Mino. Highly sought after, her work is held in the Ibaraki Ceramic Art Museum.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1450439 (stock #1788)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A striking design of swirling dots decorates this wide low chawan by female porcelain legend Ono Hakuko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yuri Haku-kin Sai Hira Chawan (White Gold Decorated Wide Tea Bowl). Blue and Green Dots swirl in a vortex from the center of the bowl. It is 16.2 cm (6-3/8 inches) diameter, 4.7 cm (2-7/8 inches) tall and in excellent condition retaining the original shiori.
From Aichi prefecture, Hakuko was trained by her father initially in the ceramic arts. However she was most strongly influenced by the great experimentive artist Kato Hajime (1901-1968) and his work with gold. This affected her own style deeply, and it can be said that she carried on his research. She was awarded the JCS award in 1980, one of Japans most prestigious ceramics awards. In 1992 she was named an important cultural asset (Juyo mukei bunkazai) of Saga prefecture. Bucking the traditional image here is another of Japans great cultural assets who fought against a system of prejudice to rise to the top and it is an honor to be able to offer something by her. For more on this important modern artist see Touch Fire, contemporary Japanese Ceramics by Women Artists (2009)
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1450351 (stock #1787)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A white porcelain bowl with silver lining by the young female artist Itaya Narumi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chawan (flower). Stylized floral motifs are raised off the raw white porcelain surface, richly textured, while the inside is sheer as gilded silk. About the delicate foot ring is glazed and sculpted with petals. The bowl is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, from the artist this year.
Itaya Narumi was born in Gifu in 1991. She graduated the Kanazawa University of Art in 2013 then graduated the Tajimi city Ceramics Research Facility in 2015. She has participated in several exhibitions since, with an emphasis on natural forms and tactile senses.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1450335 (stock #1786)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Thick iron and feldspar cover the Iga glaze of this small vase by Ayukai Kogetsu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Oni Iga Ko Tsubo. It is 13 cm (5 inches) tall, roughly 9 cm (3-3/4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. I think it would also make a nice tokkuri.
Ayukai Kogetsu is a female artist from Miyagi prefecture. During a trip to Nara after graduating university, she was struck by a calligraphy exhibition, and became a student of calligraphy under Onodera Hosen in Kessennuma. From 1969-1979 she exhibited calligraphy in a number of venues including the Shodo Geijutsu Inten, and received a number of awards. In 1979 she became a student and follower of the ceramic artist of Oni Shino fame Tsukigata Nahiko, who was also known for his painting and sculpture, all of which she absorbed over a ten year apprenticeship. She opened her own kiln in Gifu prefecture in 1992. She currently takes part in calligraphy and ceramic exhibitions throughout Japan.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1450251 (stock #1784)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Reminiscent of the Rolling Stones album cover, a wild sculpture by important contemporary sculptor Hayami Shiro. The bean shaped object is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 32 cm (12-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition. It is signed on the base and appears to be dated 1999. Typical of this artist, it comes in a cardboard box
Hayami Shiro (b. 1927) was born in Kagawa Prefecture in 1927, and graduated the Tokushima Industrial University in 1949. His first exhibitions did not materialize until 1964, and from there he flourished. From the late 60s he began exhibiting in National Sculpture exhibitions, and has been often awarded; both domestic and international. He is best known for Tile works and stone sculpture. In 2000 he received the International Artistic Cultural Award (Kokusai Geijutsu Bunka Sho). A prominent work by this artist is on semi-permanent display in front of the Freer Gallery, adjacent to the Smithsonian Museum on loan from the Hirshhorn Collection. Other works are held by the Togei No Mori Museum of Shiga Prefecture, Tokyo City Hall and the Aichi Art Culture Center.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1449912 (stock #1780)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A Beautiful bowl in crackled white set into a lattice like structure of raw porcelain pierced with a plethora of various sized holes by Kato Yoshiyasu enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Haku-yu no wan (White Glazed Bowl). A singular drip of fissured glass forms a bead from the bulging line between the thick glaze and raw clay where the two parts of the bowl have been joined. It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter, 10 cm (4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, from the artist this year.
Kato Yoshiyasu was born in Aichi prefecture in 1985, and graduated the Kurashiki Kogei Crafts School design department in 2008. He then went on to study at the Tajimi Ceramics Research Facility, finishing there in 2014. He moved to Nshio city in 2018, where he set up a studio and works today while raising a cute little baby with his wife.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1449886 (stock #1779)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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The colors of the prism show through the thick crackled glaze blanketing this Guinomi, by Kodai Ujiie enclosed in the original signed wooden box. This is a handful, great tactile qualities and entrancing to look at. It is 9-10 cm diameter, 9 cm tall and in excellent condition, directly from a recent firing.
Kodai Ujiie was born in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture in 1990, and graduated advanced studies at the Tohoku University of Art and Design in 2015. Since 2014, he has been hosted at more than half a dozen solo exhibitions, proving the popularity of his work.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1449846 (stock #1778)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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This young guy’s stuff is very chic; a sake set by Kato Yoshiyasu in purest white and darkest black, everything a dialog between shadow and form. Here the artist has used a combination of his repertoire. The cup is pure white dipped into black, the black then chiseled away in divots creating a beautiful pattern for the eyes and texture for fingers. The Ozabu (Pillow shaped Daiza saucer) is a flattened ball, dimpled to receive the cup, then pierced with various sized holes. Alongside standing sentry the bent silhouette of the Tokkuri, a dark belt between pierced white: an eggshell coming apart. The cup is petite, perfect for a summer sipping reishu cold sake, the rim folded in to trap the delicate aroma. The UFO shaped Daiza (saucer) is 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter and the Tokkuri is 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) tall. All are in excellent condition, enclosed in their respective signed boxes, directly from the artist this summer.
Kato Yoshiyasu was born in Aichi prefecture in 1985, and graduated the Kurashiki Kogei Crafts School design department in 2008. He then went on to study at the Tajimi Ceramics Research Facility, finishing there in 2014. He moved to Nshio city in 2018, where he set up a studio and works today while raising a cute little baby with his wife.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1449766 (stock #1777)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A fabulous stone textured Guinomi by Inayoshi Osamu enclosed in the original signed wooden box featuring dark raw clay alternating with black and white glaze. Osamu is very low production, and very selective of what he allows out into the world, and I am proud to be able to offer this. It is 7.5 cm (3 inches) diameter, 5.5 cm (2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Inayoshi Osamu was born in Aichi prefecture in 1976, the heart of Mino country. He completed his initial training in the plastic arts at the Seto Pottery School in 2002, garnering an award that same year at the 56th Seto City Art Exhibition. In 2007 he established his own kiln in Toyohashi, and was awarded at the 19th Heart of Oribe Pottery exhibition (again the following year). In 2008 he began to focus on the Atsumi pottery of the Heian and Kamakura periods, building up a unique repertoire. After several more domestic shows and prizes, he had his overseas debut in 2010, and has since received a great deal of attention both at home and abroad. He has just moved into a new kiln and workshop this summer, and I am looking forward to what will come out of there this autumn.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1449731 (stock #1774)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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A breathtaking work by Hashimoto Tomonari, deep space covered in random clouds and explosions of color like some precious treasure, the origin of life, from another world. It is roughly 24 cm (9-1/2 inches) diameter, 34 cm (14 inches) tall and weighs 4.2 kilograms and comes enclosed in a signed wooden box from the artist this year.
Hashimoto Tomonari was born the son of a sculptor and has felt comfortable with the processes of creation since childhood. He graduated with a masters from the Kanazawa University of Art in March 2017, then relocated to Shigaraki. A visit to his humble home studio is eye opening. Although he comes across as shy in conversation, when you move on to the subject of art, he is all confidence. He was named a finalist for the Loewe Craft Prize in 2019 and is already making international waves around Asia. He is held in the collection of the V&A London, Los Angeles County Museum and Kalamazoo Institute of Arts among others.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1449598 (stock #1772)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An Amazing Shigaraki flattened form with offset neck covered in pools of liquid green crystal and dark encrustations of ash by Furutani Hirofumi, head of the Churoku-en. This piece truly shows the best of what Shigaraki has to offer, in the exposed raw terracotta clay, the molten ash glaze, the Hi-iro color of flame, and the build up of dark ash deposits. Every viewing angle is unique. This flattened form has been made by separating two slabs with a band of clay which has had feet and a wheel thrown neck added. Unlike others who have made similar shapes, Hirofumi offsets the neck in a refreshing way. The vessel is quite large at 36 x 13 x 41 cm tall (14 x 5 x 16 inches tall) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist. It comes with a wooden placard signed by the artist and titled Shigaraki Shizen Yu Henko.
If you have never visited Shigaraki put it on the list. Downtown is pretty much Showa-Retro (a leftover from the Showa era) with rusting buildings stacked up with giant Tanuki sculptures and stacks of industrial grade ceramics. However, tucked in the middle is a small wood framed gallery, a real gem called the Churoku-en. The Churoku-en pottery was established by Furutani Churoku, and is now run by the second and third generation potters Furutani Hirofumi and his son Taketoshi. But they are rarely there, more often than not working at the family kiln which is out of the main business district. You will meet Hirofumis wife, a cherubic woman who will seem perhaps startled to see you but more than happy to show you around. The first time we met she seemed shocked to see visitors and I asked about that. She said: Most people do not come into our gallery.
I asked: Why is that?
She replied: There are no Tanukis out front, so it looks expensive!
We laughed about that and I remember it every time we meet. Her husband Hirofumi is the real deal, a Shigaraki potter trained under his father, recipient of generations of tradition and knowledge, who does not say much. Everyday you will find him in search of the natural phenomena which are born from his wood fired Anagama and Climbing kilns in the dialog between soil and flame and the elements. He does not compete or seek fame, just quietly makes pots in that very Japanese way, the path of the Unknown Craftsman.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Vases : Contemporary item #1449540 (stock #1771)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Wow I need that! is all I could say the first time I saw this piece by Furutani Taketoshi while visiting the Churokuen Kiln early this year. The tendrils of natural ash glaze wrap around the simplified form like the roots of some ancient Shinboku (God Tree). It is unpretentious, but stands out clearly as a masterpiece by this very talented young potter. It comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Shizen Yu Yohen Hanaire (Shigaraki Natural Ash Glazed Kiln Altered Vase). The vessel is 16 cm (6-1/4 inches) diameter, 25.5 cm (10 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Furutani Taketoshi was born the son of master craftsman Furutani Hirofumi in 1974, graduating the Shigaraki Industrial High School Ceramics department in 1992 before entering the Shiga prefectural Ceramics Research Facility studying wheel technique, graduating the following year. He then did a year apprenticeship at a pottery before re-entering for a second course at the Research Facility, graduating in 1995. From that year he returned to the family kiln, receiving the family tradition from both his grandfather Furutani Churoku and father Furutani Hirofumi. Subverting the self, he makes simple, organic pots which have a timeless quality, very much rooted in the now, but paying homage to the traditions past down through the ages. He was named a Designated Traditional Craftsman (Dento Kogeishi) in 2013. He has exhibited with the Nihon Dento Kogeiten among others, and still works closely with his father at the family kiln.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1449432 (stock #1769)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
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Large Leafed Vines are silhouetted against age darkened silver on this striking covered basin by Banura Shiro enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A segment of vine serves as a handle on the lid and it appears to float above the table on three ribbon feet. It is 25 cm (10 inches) diameter, 15 cm (6 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Banura Shiro (1941-2001) was born the fourth son of influential Lacquer Artist Banura Shogo. His sensitivity to textures may stem from that exacting influence. Although his older brother succeeded the family tradition (another branching into paper arts), Shiro, after graduating the Kyoto University of Fine Art, apprenticed in the plastic arts under Kawamura Kitaro (1899-1966) who was a student of Kitaoji Rosanjin. Rosanjin, a restaurateur, artist, and overall renaissance man believed the dish was there to support and bring out the beauty of food served. Shiro took this as his raison d’etre; his lifetime pursuit to create dishes which complimented the seasonality, texture, color and flavor. He had an impressive list of exhibitions, including a private exhibition at the Umeda Kindai Bijutsu-Ten as well as the Niponbashi Mitsukoshi, Takashimaya, and Ikebukuro Tobu, the equivalent of being displayed on New Yorks Fifth Avenue or other cities most Trendy streets, as well as many international exhibitions. Like most Iga-area artists, his output was low, but quality and originality high, making his work very much in demand.