Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary
By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489646 (stock #MC705)
Caribbean-Blue glass fills this crusty earthen bowl by Ogawa Machiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Saiyu Bachi. It is roughly 27cm (11 inches) diameter, 10 cm (4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ogawa Machiko was born in Sapporo on the Northern Island of Hokkaido in 1946. She studied under future Living National Treasures Fujimoto Yoshimichi, Tamura Koichi and Kato Hajime at the Tokyo University of Arts, graduating in 1969, then went on to further studies in France and Africa, returning to Japan in 1975. She began garnering attention in the mid eighties, and has since become one of the leading female figures in Japanese pottery. She was awarded the JCS prize in 2001, one of Japans most prestigious awards. Work by her is held in the Brooklyn Art Museum, LACMA, New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, Smith College, MIA, MOMAT and a host of others. For more see “Touch Fire, Contemporary Ceramics by Women Artists” (2009) or Toh, volume 67 (1993). For more information see the current exhibition Radical Clay at the Chicago Art Institute.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1489645 (stock #MC219)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A very unusual form of overlapping bubbles in snow white porcelain by Yatsugi Miho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakuji Chawan Hitoawa (A Bubble). It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, directly from the artist.
Yatsugi Miho was born in Tokyo in 1973, and initially graduated advanced studies at the Tokyo National University of Agriculture and Technology in 1998. In 2018 she completed training at the Ibaraki Prefectural Kasama Togeidai Facility in the traditional Kasama region, then went on to the Tajimi Ceramics Research Facility. Her work has been featured at any number of private venues as well as the Joryu Togeiten Ceramics Exhibition.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1489428
A gossamer work by the demanding young female artist Lu Xueyun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Breeze 2019-I. The vessel is made up of married sheets of thin porcelain, so thin in fact that light passes easily through it. Her works are truly exquisite, captivating in their frailty. I have been following the diaphanous works of this artist (known in Japan by the Japanese reading of her name, Ro-san) for nearly 5 years and waiting for the opportunity to introduce her to the outer world. This is 21.5 x 27.5 x 13.5 cm (8-1/2 x 11 x 5-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist
Lu Xueyun was born in Chongqing, China in 1987 and graduated the SiChuan International Studies University in 2010, before taking a position in a Chinese company overseas division. Unsatisfied with corporate life, she enrolled in the Traditional Arts Super College of Kyoto, Ceramics Course graduating in 2019, then did two years study at the Ishoken Tajimi City Pottery Design and Technical Center. While there she took part in several juried and group exhibitions, but this is the first time her works have been shown to an international audience.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489344 (stock #MC607)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A large Serving dish covered entirely in a volatile landscape of scholars and winding mountain paths populated by towering temples and bridges spanning precipitous gaps by Shigemori Yoko enclosed in a wooden box titled Sansui E-zara. Performed with blue over a cream colored glaze, it is 33 x 35 x 3.5 cm (roughly 13 x 14 x 1-1/4 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist’s family, with a wooden box signed by her brother Naoki.
Shigemori Yoko (1953-2021) was born in Kagoshima. Yoko came to Kyoto where she initially studied painting at the Kyoto Tankidai Art College, then moved to ceramics at the Kyoto Municipal Art University where she studied traditional pottery techniques under Kondo Yutaka before entering advanced courses under avant-garde Yagi Kazuo, graduating in 1979. Her first solo exhibitions were held while still a student at Gallery Iteza in Kyoto. She eschewed the world of competitive exhibitions in favor of the intimacy of private galleries, and her list of solo exhibitions is expansive. She received the Yagi Kazuo prize in 1986 and 1988 at the Nihon Gendai Togeiten National Modern Ceramics Exhibition. She was one of five artists featured in Toh, volume 76, the first issue dedicated to Kyoto potters. Toh was, at the time
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489215 (stock #MC702)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Wet swirls of color, lavender and thin blue fringed with yellow decorated this odd shaped slab-ware vase by Shigemori Yoko enclosed in a signed wooden box titled Murasaki no Hi (Purple Days). This is a work in unusual style by one of our favorite female artists. It is 22x 8.5 x 19.5 cm (9 x 3-1/4 x 8 inches) and is in excellent condition enclosed in a box annotated by her brother Naoki.
Shigemori Yoko (1953-2021) was born in Kagoshima. Yoko came to Kyoto where she initially studied painting at the Kyoto Tankidai Art College, then moved to ceramics at the Kyoto Municipal Art University where she studied traditional pottery techniques under Kondo Yutaka before entering advanced courses under avant-garde Yagi Kazuo, graduating in 1979. Her first solo exhibitions were held while still a student at Gallery Iteza in Kyoto. She eschewed the world of competitive exhibitions in favor of the intimacy of private galleries, and her list of solo exhibitions is expansive. She received the Yagi Kazuo prize in 1986 and 1988 at the Nihon Gendai Togeiten National Modern Ceramics Exhibition. She was one of five artists featured in Toh, volume 76, the first issue dedicated to Kyoto potters. Toh was, at the time
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 2000 item #1489213 (stock #MC703)
A playful troupe of elephants parade around the rim of this early bowl by Shigemori Yoko enclosed in a signed wooden box titled Zobachi. The creatures are in relief, raised from the surface, not engraved into it. This was made by pressing the clay slab onto a surface into which were engraved the family of creatures. It is roughly 13cm 12.7 cm (over 5 inches) diameter, 6 cm (2-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Shigemori Yoko (1953-2021) was born in Kagoshima. Yoko came to Kyoto where she initially studied painting at the Kyoto Tankidai Art College, then moved to ceramics at the Kyoto Municipal Art University where she studied traditional pottery techniques under Kondo Yutaka before entering advanced courses under avant-garde Yagi Kazuo, graduating in 1979. Her first solo exhibitions were held while still a student at Gallery Iteza in Kyoto. She eschewed the world of competitive exhibitions in favor of the intimacy of private galleries, and her list of solo exhibitions is expansive. She received the Yagi Kazuo prize in 1986 and 1988 at the Nihon Gendai Togeiten National Modern Ceramics Exhibition. She was one of five artists featured in Toh, volume 76, the first issue dedicated to Kyoto potters. Toh was, at the time
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1489154 (stock #MC704)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A playful bowl in vivid colors by Tokuda Junko (Tokuda Yasokichi IV) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Kutani Chawan. It is 13cm (just over 5 inches) diameter, 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Tokuda Junko (Yasokichi IV) was born the first child of future Living National Treasure Tokuda Masahiko in 1961. While on a trip to the United States in her mid-20s, the young Tokuda came across a pot from Jingdezhen, China and drew her back to the fold of the family tradition. She graduated from the Institute for Kutani in 1990 and embarked on her path as an artist. Succeeding the family name in 2010 upon the passing of her father, Junko is one of very few female heads of traditional potting family.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489084 (stock #MC139)
A magnificent large spiraling work in dark iron by Takatsu Mio. Perfection of form defines this young female artists work, and this does not disappoint. It begins at a blunt point, tightly spiraling outward as the shape evolves from a thick round to a wide spiraling flange. A very challenging work which seems to defy understanding. It is 66 cm long and in excellent condition, directly from the artist. It is signed beneath.
Takatsu Mio (b. 1976) was raised in Gifu prefecture among the scattered kilns of Mino. She graduated the Osaka University of Arts Sculpture Department in 1999, moving on to advanced studies which she completed in 2001, putting her at the forefront of the current female revolution in Japanese ceramic arts. Her first exhibited works were in 1999, and then again in Tokyo in 2001. The following year she exhibited with the 6th International Ceramics Exhibition in Mino with several private exhibitions over the following years in many top venues. In 2005 she made her overseas debut. In 2009 her work was featured in Women Ceramic Artists in the 21st Century (Paramita Museum/Mie Japan) 2011 saw her work accepted into the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition in Italy, as well as the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition. She had to take a break to concentrate on motherhood and raising a baby, but it back in the saddle again, creating new works and showing what a woman and a mother can do.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1489009 (stock #MC153)
A wild ceramic sculpture in rich dark iron glaze by Takatsu Mio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Soko ni Seisoku Suru (Living There). Mio is an amazing person, very intense when she works, very casual when she is not. She will happily take a hammer to a piece after months of work, if it does not meet her inner criteria, thus her production is quite low, but quality is extremely high. This piece is 37 cm (14-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition, from the artist this summer.
Takatsu Mio (b. 1976) was raised in Gifu prefecture among the scattered kilns of Mino. She graduated the Osaka University of Arts Sculpture Department in 1999, moving on to advanced studies which she completed in 2001. Her first exhibited works were in 1999, and then again in Tokyo in 2001. The following year she exhibited with the 6th International Ceramics Exhibition in Mino with several private exhibitions over the following years in some of Japans top venues. In 2005 she made her overseas debut. In 2009 her work was featured in Women Ceramic Artists in the 21st Century (Paramita Museum/Mie Japan) 2011 saw her work accepted into the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition in Italy, as well as the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488989 (stock #MC071)
A ribbon of iron glaze rises up like a swirling flame, a quintessential work by female artist Takatsu Mio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Work 1602. This is 43 cm (17 inches) tall and in excellent condition, directly from the artist.
Takatsu Mio (b. 1976) was raised in Gifu prefecture among the scattered kilns of Mino. She graduated the Osaka University of Arts Sculpture Department in 1999, moving on to advanced studies which she completed in 2001. Her first exhibited works were in 1999, and then again in Tokyo in 2001. The following year she exhibited with the 6th International Ceramics Exhibition in Mino with several private exhibitions over the following years in some of Japans top venues. In 2005 she made her overseas debut. In 2009 her work was featured in Women Ceramic Artists in the 21st Century (Paramita Museum/Mie Japan) 2011 saw her work accepted into the Faenza International Ceramics Exhibition in Italy, as well as the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramics Exhibition. She spends many days refining the shape of each piece she makes. If there is something she does not like, no matter how much time has gone into a piece, she will simply shatter it and start again. She is now a mother, and her time is split between running her home, child care and sculpting. Thus her output is very low but quality high.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488988 (stock #MC677)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A masterpiece by Shigaraki Icon Koyama Kiyoko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shigaraki Shizen-yu Mentori Hanaire. She was well known for both her Mentori works, and the exuberant amount of ash accumulated from the 10 plus day firings of her kiln. This is a prime example of both those features. It is 24.5 cm (just udner 10 inches) diameter, roughly the same height, and in excellent condition.
Koyama Kiyoko was born in Sasebo, Nagasaki in 1936. Following the second world war the family moved to Shiga prefecture, eventually settling in the pottery village of Shigaraki. She took a job as a ceramic painter's assistant at a young age. In 1954 she began to work as a pottery decorator in Shigaraki under Nakashima Takamitsu. Later she moved to Kyoto to study Kenzan ware and Sometsuke under Yoshitake Eijiro. Aged 27 she began working in earnest in clay and studying clay technique under Misawa Kenzo. Enthralled by an ancient pot shard with natural blue ash glaze, she sought to recreate this effect in modern times, building her own kiln and repeatedly firing, searching for that magic point, but slowly pushing the family toward insolvency. Not only was she attempting to break barriers with the pots she created, but she was forced to break barriers in a male dominated world where women were prohibited from the wood fired kiln as unworthy. She did have her supporters of course, and with their help and persistence and ever longer firings she eventually succeeded in finding that blue. Kiyoko has a list of shows and prizes which would fill pages, including the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten Traditional Crafts Exhibition, Nihon Togei Ten Ceramic Exhibition, the Asahi Togei Ten Ceramics Exhibition as well as many international exhibitions. Her son Koyama Kenichi (1961-1992) worked to take over the family kiln, but succumbed to Leukemia after a long fight. Their story is the subject of the film Hi-Bi (2005) and the recent NHK television drama Scarlet. She is the preeminent pioneering female wood firing artist in Japan, and bore the brunt of centuries of discrimination against women. Through it all she persevered to become one of the most highly sought of Shigaraki potters. For more on her works see Modern Japanese Ceramics in American Collections, Japan Society New York, 1993
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488955 (stock #MC276)
An organic sake cup on stand in pastel yellow by Yamaguchi Michi enclosed in the orignalsl signed wooden box titled Shuhai. It is roughly 6 cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist.
Yamaguchi Michie was born in Aichi prefecture in 1964, and came to pottery at the age of 35, opening her studio in Nagoya in 2003. She first exhibited with the Nitten National Art Exhibition in 2008. In 2009 she was accepted into the Nihon Togeiten National Ceramic exhibition, where she has been subsequently awarded. That same year she was recipient of the Shorei-sho prize at the Kobe Biennale, and she entered for the first time the Womans Association of Ceramic Artists (WACA) Exhibition, receiving the T-shi prize. In 2011 she would be awarded at the Kikuchi Biennale, the 45th Female Artist Exhibition, as well as the Nihon Shin Kogeiten National New Crafts Exhibition. She would also first enter the International Ceramics Festival in Mino. 2012 saw her work awarded at the Mino Togei Shorokusho Chawan Ten Tea Bowl exhibition as well as the Mino Togei Ceramic Exhibition. In 2014 she was prized at the Hagi Taisho-ten show. She was awarded again in 2017 at the 43rd Mino Togeiten, and Governors prize at the 54th WACA Exhibition in 2020. In 2021 she was awarded the 43rd Nihon Shin Kogeiten New Crafts Exhibition, as well as the Kasama Togei Taishou Ten and in 2022 at the Tobi Ceramic Art Society of Japan Exhibition. She has taken part in ceramic events in Europe and Korea, and her work is held in the Toshin Ceramic Museum.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488889 (stock #MC668)
This large blossom by Nakazato Hiroko is covered in earthy pastel colors, rising to a voluptuous crescendo of petals. She says:
I am strongly attracted to the objects created by nature.
A lush plant that grows day by day, especially from early spring to early summer.
The expansion of form from bud to flower and the beautiful colors that spread inside...
In recent years, I have felt a strong vitality in these things,
Through the medium of ceramics, I strive to express this feeling the possibility.
It is 25 x 32.5 x 36 cm (10 x 13 x 14 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist and comes with a signed wooden placard.
Hiroko Nakazato was born in Yokohama in 1966. She graduated the Kyoto City University of Arts with an MA in 1992. She has held over 20 solo exhibitions since. She has been featured in the Nihon Kogeiten Japanese Crafts Exhibition, International Ceramics Festival Mino and the Asahi Contemporary Crafts Exhibition among many others. Her work was awarded at the 5th Mashiko Ceramics Competition in 2004. She also garnered acclaim at the 58th Japan Craft Exhibition as well as the 8th Kikuchi Biennale in 2019. In 2021 she was awarded again at the 9th Kikuchi Biennale. Her work is held in the Kyoto City KYOCERA Museum of Art (Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art) .
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488856 (stock #MC667)
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
Pastels color the voluptuous curving petals form this blossom by contemporary female ceramic artist Nakazato Hiroko. According to her: I am strongly attracted to the objects created by nature.
A lush plant that grows day by day, especially from early spring to early summer.
The expansion of form from bud to flower and the beautiful colors that spread inside...
In recent years, I have felt a strong vitality in these things,
Through the medium of ceramics, I strive to express this feeling the possibility.
It is sculpted from a heavy block of clay, the weight surprising given the light, delicate imagery created by her fingers. It is 22 x 25.5 x 23.5 cm (9 x 10 x 9-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist and comes with a signed wooden placard.
Hiroko Nakazato was born in Yokohama in 1966. She graduated the Kyoto City University of Arts with an MA in 1992. She has held over 20 solo exhibitions since. She has been featured in the Nihon Kogeiten Japanese Crafts Exhibition, International Ceramics Festival Mino and the Asahi Contemporary Crafts Exhibition among many others. Her work was awarded at the 5th Mashiko Ceramics Competition in 2004. She also garnered acclaim at the 58th Japan Craft Exhibition as well as the 8th Kikuchi Biennale in 2019. In 2021 she was awarded again at the 9th Kikuchi Biennale. Her work is held in the Kyoto City KYOCERA Museum of Art (Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art) .
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1488835
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A long low basin by Lu Xueyen in translucent white porcelain enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Enfolding II. It is 21.5 x 38 x 15 cm (8-1/2 x 15 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist.
I have been following the diaphanous works of Lu Xueyun (known in Japan by the Japanese reading of her name, Ro-san) for nearly 5 years and waiting for the opportunity to introduce her to the outer world.
Lu Xueyun was born in Chongqing, China in 1987 and graduated the SiChuan International Studies University in 2010, before taking a position in a Chinese company overseas division. Unsatisfied with corporate life, she enrolled in the Traditional Arts Super College of Kyoto, Ceramics Course graduating in 2019, then did two years study at the Ishoken Tajimi City Pottery Design and Technical Center. While there she took part in several juried and group exhibitions, but this is the first time her works have been shown to an international audience.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Porcelain : Contemporary item #1488802
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A large work of overlapping strips of sheer porcelain by the demanding young female artist Lu Xueyun enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vessel is made up of overlapping strips of thin porcelain, so thin in fact that light passes easily through it. Her works are truly exquisite, captivating in their frailty. I have been following the artist (known in Japan by the Japanese reading of her name, Ro-san) for nearly 5 years and waiting for the opportunity to introduce her to the outer world. This is 29.5 x 31.5 x 19 cm (roughly 1 foot diameter x 7-3/4 inches tall) and is in excellent condition, directly from the artist
Lu Xueyun was born in Chongqing, China in 1987 and graduated the SiChuan International Studies University in 2010, before taking a position in a Chinese company overseas division. Unsatisfied with corporate life, she enrolled in the Traditional Arts Super College of Kyoto, Ceramics Course graduating in 2019, then did two years study at the Ishoken Tajimi City Pottery Design and Technical Center. While there she took part in several juried and group exhibitions, but this is the first time her works have been shown to an international audience.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488730
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A spectacular large vase by Kashima Aya featured at the “Ceramic Synergy Exhibition” held at the Kyoto Kyocera Museum of Art in late 2023. In fact, the initial form is created, then a thin layer of ceramic is made separately, dried, then cracked, and the individual pieces are applied like mosaic to the prepared form. The space in between the tiles is then abraded, the tiles glazed with color and the space n between glazed with iron. Each piece requires a great amount of painstaking dedication to complete. It is 26 cm (10 inches) diameter, 52.5 cm (20-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, directly from the artist. It comes in a signed wooden box with a copy of the Museum exhibition pamphlet upon which it is visible.
Kashima Aya was born in Kanagawa prefecture in 1987. She graduated the Tokyo Kasei Gakuin University, Department of Arts and Culture in 2010. She graduated the Tajimi City Ceramic Design Institute Design Course in 2020, with an additional two years in their advanced Ceramic Lab, graduating in 2022. During this time, she took part in many group exhibitions. She received Nyusen status at the 55th Women's Association of Ceramic Artists (WACA) Exhibition in 2021.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1488699
Modern Japanese Ceramics
sold, thank you
A large white Tea Bowl by Kashima Aya enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The technique is deceptively complex. In fact, the initial form is created, then a thin layer of ceramic is made separately, dried, then cracked, and the individual pieces are applied like mosaic to the prepared form. The space in between the tiles is then abraded, the tiles glazed with color and the space n between glazed with iron. Each piece requires a great amount of painstaking dedication to complete. It is 13.5 cm (5-1/4 inches) diameter, 9.5 cm (just under 4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, directly from the artist. Kashima Aya was born in Kanagawa prefecture in 1987. She graduated the Tokyo Kasei Gakuin University, Department of Arts and Culture in 2010. She graduated the Tajimi City Ceramic Design Institute Design Course in 2020, with an additional two years in their advanced Ceramic Lab, graduating in 2022. During this time, she took part in many group exhibitions. She received Nyusen status at the 55th Women's Association of Ceramic Artists (WACA) Exhibition in 2021. In 2023 her work was selected for presentation at the “Ceramic Synergy Exhibition” held at the Kyoto Kyocera Museum of Art.