Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary

By Appointment is best. You might get lucky just popping by, but a great deal of the month I am out visiting artists or scouring up new items, so days in the gallery are limited.

Post-war Giant Fujihira Shin Ceramic Suiteki Water Dropper


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Directory: Artists: Ceramics: Pre 2000: Item # 1399874

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An unusual Suiteki Water Dropper by Avant-garde artist Fujihira Shin enclosed in a cloth bound box typical of Department Store Exhibition sales signed by the artist dating circa 1987 titled Suiteki, Fukuju Muryo (Waterdropper, Unbounded Fortune). The same four characters guard the four corners of the work itself. Is it a square Enso Zen image? Or perhaps a traditional wooden sake cup overflowing with joy? Whatever it is, it is up to you to decide. The piece measures 11.5cm (4-1/2 inches) square and in excellent condition.
Fujihira Shin (1922-2012) was born into the family of a ceramics dealer in Kyoto, raised among the pots, and attended the Art University, however, in his second year would lose four years of his life to battling illness. This life and death struggle would make him a strong character, coming forth from then on in his works. He would come to the National Scene first upon receiving the Hokutosho prize at the Nitten National Exhibition in 1958. This brought him to the forefront of the ceramics scene. He was awarded the JCS (Japan Ceramic Society) award in 1973. During his career works by him were often selected to represent Japan and it’s arts overseas, in Europe, and the Americas. He was awarded the order of cultural merit in 1991 by Kyoto prefecture. In 1993 the Mainichi Ceramics Prize. In 1996 Kyoto prefectural order of cultural merit and in 1998 received the Japan Ceramic Society Gold Prize, one of the highest honors for a Japanese potter. Held in the collections of the V&A, National Museum in Warsaw, The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo has more than a dozen pieces, only to be outdone by Kyoto which has more than 20 pieces.