Modern Japanese Ceramics Pottery Contemporary

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Kawase Takeshi (Chikushi) Hakuji Sake Cup


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Directory: Artists: Ceramics: Porcelain: Contemporary: Item # 1393630

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Modern Japanese Ceramics
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An exquisite hakuji porcelain bowl by Kawase Chikushi (Takeshi) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Botan Moyo Hai. The imagery of stylized peony are raised from the surface only visible by the shadow of white on white. It is 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. A perfect theme for winter and celebrating the New year.
Kawase Chikushun II (born Junichi, 1923-2007) was a second generation Kyoto born potter, the son of Kawase Chikushun I (Chikuo, 1894-1983) and father of celebrated celadon artist Kawase Shinobu. He studied under his father, but after the hard years of WWII and subsequent defeat, he left the family kiln in Kyoto to establish one in Kanagawa prefecture in 1949. The following year his first son was born. He took the name Chikushun II in 1979.
Kawase Takeshi (Chikushi) was born the second son of Chikushun II, the younger brother of Kawase Shinobu. He studied alongside his brother under his father, and began producing pots in his own name in 1976 (the same year his brother held his first solo exhibition). The following year his works were part of the exhibitions Kawase Chikushun Sandai Yonin Ten (Kawase Chikushun,Three Generations, Four Potters) held at the Ogaki city Culture hall. Overall it is Chikushi (Takeshi) who took the reins of the kiln, concentrating on the day to day operation and exhibiting in private galleries. He opened his own kiln in 1991. Later diagnosed with cancer, even during his Chemotherapy, he continued to pot up to the time he died in 2007, the same year as his father.